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Fruit of the Month

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I am sure that many of you know about the "5 a Day" plan where you are supposed to eat at least 5 fruits and veggies a day and they say up to 9 is even better. Well, this plan has many good ideas and well thought out information and the "5 a Day" idea works well within the parameters of WW so I thought I would post the 'fruit of the month' as well as the 'vegetable of the month. I will find this thread and add to it each month. Since I am two and almost three months behind, I will go ahead and post January, February, and March, and if I have time, I will post April as well.

 

This could take a few days because I plan to add recipes to try in each month's segment.

 

JANUARY: DRIED FRUIT:

 

Drying is the oldest method of preserving food. The first European settlers in America often ate dried corn, apple, currants, grapes and meat. Sun drying of food was an easy way to prolong the life of food, but this form of dried food was different from what is available today. In different climates, the food dried differently because complete sun drying is dependent on very particular weather conditions. Drying eliminates moisture from the food resulting in a longer food life. Organisms that make food spoil require moisture to survive, so foods that have been completely dried have the longest life.

 

The methods of drying food, particularly fruits and vegetables, have become more sophisticated over time. The three most common methods used today are briefly described below:

  • Solar: Solar dehydration of food requires 3 to 5 consecutive days of 95 degrees or above and low humidity. This climate is found only in limited areas in the United States.
  • Oven: Foods are dried using a household kitchen oven. This method can be expensive as many hours are normally required to dry food. Oven dried foods are often times darker and more brittle than foods dried by other methods. This method is often suggested for first time dryers, as very little new equipment is required for this method.
  • Dehydrator: This type of drying produces the highest quality product. An electric dehydrator may be purchased and various sizes and levels of quality are generally available.

Dried fruits and vegetables are high in fiber and carbohydrates and low in fat. However, dried foods are more calorically dense than their fresh counterparts. The recommended serving size for dried fruits and vegetables is half that of fresh.

 

Vitamin C is one nutrient that is destroyed by heat. Pretreating food with citrus juice can help increase the vitamin C content of the dried food.

 

 

dryfruit_pineapple.jpg Selection

 

For drying at home, select ripe fruits and vegetables for drying. Bruised fruit may be used if those areas are removed before drying. Do not use any food with mold on it for drying. Peel and slice food into 1/8 to 1/2 inch slices. The higher the water content, the larger the slice should be because the more it will shrink in drying.

 

Pretreating food before drying is a common practice, but not required. Dipping fruits into citrus juices (orange, lemon, or pineapple) helps avoid color changes. Vegetables are best dipped in diluted lemon juice before drying (1/4 cup lemon juice to 2 cups water).

 

Blanching is also recommended for certain vegetables (asparagus, green beans, broccoli, brussles sprouts, cauliflower, and peas). Blanch vegetables in boiling water for 1 to 3 minutes, or until the skin cracks.

 

If you choose to purchase dried fruit at the supermarket, you will generally find a good selection of the most popular fruits. A larger selection of items, especially dried vegetables, are often found at natural food stores. Most dried fruit is sold pre-packaged and may be found in either the fresh produce or canned food departments.

 

Dried fruits and vegetables are also sometimes available in the bulk foods section. Do not purchase any dried food with mold or an abnormal smell.

 

 

Storage

 

Whether dried at home or purchased, dried fruits and vegetables should be kept in an airtight container. Refrigeration is not necessary, but some people prefer the taste of cold dried food. Dried fruit may be frozen, but this sometimes affects the texture and taste of the food.

 

Shelf life varies from product to product, but most items will keep, if stored properly, for a minimum of one month. Some items, such as raisins, have a significantly longer shelf life of approximately a year or more.

 

 

Preparation

 

Generally, once a fruit or vegetable is dried, there is no additional preparation before using. Many recipes require the fruit or vegetable be sliced or diced, which is often easier when the item has been refrigerated overnight. Dried fruit and vegetables are commonly used in bread, desserts, granola, or as a topping.

 

 

Favorites

 

These are the most practical and common items to dry:

  • Fruit: Ripe apples, berries, cherries, peaches, apricots and pears
  • Vegetables: Peas, corn, peppers, tomatoes, onions, potatoes and green beans

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Dried Fruit Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Add dried cranberries to a rice dish to add flavor and color.
  • Sprinkle raisins and dried berries into your morning cereal.
  • Sun dried tomatoes add texture and flavor to pasta and rice dishes.
  • Dried apricots work great in muffins and breads.
  • Dried cherries add color and nutrients to granola or trail mix.

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Apricot Pumpkin Muffins

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 12 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 cups reduced fat Bisquick®

1/2 cup dried apricots -- chopped

1/4 cup sugar

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ginger

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1/2 cup milk, skim

1/2 cup canned pumpkin

2 egg whites, whole

 

In a medium bowl, combine baking mix, apricots, sugar, cinnamon, ginger

and nutmeg. Mix together milk, pumpkin and egg until well blended. Combine

2 mixtures; beat vigorously 1/2 minute. Fill 12 greased medium muffin cups

2/3 full. Bake in 400f F oven 15 to 20 minutes or until lightly browned on

top. Remove from cups and serve warm.

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 116 Calories; 1g Fat (10.7%

calories from fat); 3g Protein; 23g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; trace

Cholesterol; 268mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 0

Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1/2 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 2 points per muffin.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Couscous with Dried Cranberries, Hazelnuts and Fresh Mint

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

12 ounces couscous

14 1/2 ounces vegetable broth

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 teaspoon lemon juice -- fresh

1/2 cup craisins

2 tablespoons hazelnuts

1/3 cup mint leaves -- fresh

 

Cook the couscous according to the package directions, using broth instead

of water. Add a pinch of salt to the broth.

 

While it is cooking, roast the hazelnuts in a very low (250 degrees) oven

for 10 minutes or until lightly brown. Wash and finely chop the mint

leaves. When the couscous has finished cooking, drain any excess liquid.

If more liquid is needed to cook the couscous, add water, a little at a

time. Pour the couscous into a serving bowl. Add the oil and the lemon

juice. Stir well to coat all the grains. Add the cranberries, hazelnuts

and mint leaves. Stir to combine all the ingredients. Serve immediately.

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 332 Calories; 6g Fat (15.0%

calories from fat); 9g Protein; 60g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 1mg

Cholesterol; 549mg Sodium. Exchanges: 3 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 0

Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 1 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 6 points per serving.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Fresh and Dried Apple Dressing

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 1/2 cups yellow onion -- finely chopped

2 cloves garlic -- minced

1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

3/4 cup apples -- peeled, cored and chopped

1 cup dried apples -- chopped

3 Tablespoons raisins -- or dried currants

1 Tablespoon fresh sage -- finely chopped

1 cup apple cider

salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

 

Warm olive oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add onion and garlic and

saute for about 5 minutes. Add ginger and fresh apples and saute for 3-5

minutes. Add dried apples, currants and sage and stir well. Pour in cider

and raise heat to medium high. Cook, stirring occasionally until cider is

absorbed, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Serve with roasted

pork tenderloin medallions.

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 133 Calories; 5g Fat (30.1%

calories from fat); 1g Protein; 24g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 16mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 1

1/2 Fruit; 1 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is between 2 and 3 points so I count it as 3.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Wild Rice with Sun Dried Tomatoes

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

4 oz wild rice

2 Tbsp pine nuts

1 cup tomatoes, dried -- NOT oil packed

2 tablespoons black olives -- sliced

1/3 cup parsley -- minced

 

Cook the rice in an abundant amount of boiling salted water in a large pot

for 35 to 45 minutes or until the grains have almost doubled in size and

are tender, but still chewy. Toast the pine nuts lightly (dry skillet)

until tan and add to rice. Toss gently to mix.

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 167 Calories; 3g Fat (16.9%

calories from fat); 7g Protein; 30g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 325mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 0

Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 3 points per serving.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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FEBRUARY: STAR FRUIT

 

The star fruit or carambola is a tropical fruit that is gaining popularity in the United States. This fruit acquired its name from the five pointed star shape when cut across the middle of the fruit. It has a waxy, golden yellow to green color skin with a complicated flavor combination that includes plums, pineapples, and lemons.

 

Star FruitServing size 125g

Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 40 Calories from Fat 5Total Fat 0g0%Saturated Fat 0g0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Sodium 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 10g3% Dietary Fiber 3g12% Sugars 7gProtein 1gVitamin A15%Vitamin C45%Calcium0%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

Originally from Sri Lanka and the Moluccas, and cultivated in Southeast Asia and Malaysia for several hundred years, this fruit also goes by many other names including: bilimbi, belimbing, Chinese star fruit, five-angled fruit and the star apple. Today, star fruit flourishes in south Florida and Hawaii because the fruit thrives on growing in a warm environment. Two types of star fruit are grown, tart and sweet. Tart varieties typically have narrowly spaced ribs, while sweet varieties tend to have thick, fleshy ribs. The tastes between the two are hardly distinguishable, as the tart variety still has some sweetness. This tropical fruit is readily available July through February.

 

Star fruits are an excellent source of vitamin C, is low fat, and naturally sodium and cholesterol free. A small whole star fruit will provide approximately 2/3 cup sliced.

 

 

Selection

 

Select firm, shiny skinned, even colored fruit. Star fruits will ripen at room temperature and have lightly brown edges on the ribs when it’s ripe. Avoid purchasing star fruit with brown, shriveled ribs. This delicious fruit is also available dried.

 

 

Storage

 

Non-ripe star fruit should be turned often, until they are yellow in color and ripe with light brown ribs. Store ripe star fruits at room temperature for two to three days or unwashed, and refrigerated, in a plastic bag for up to one week.

 

 

Preparation

 

Star fruits are great to eat out of hand as these tropical delights do not need to be peeled or seeded before eating. Simply wash the fruit, remove any blemished areas, cut crosswise to get the star shape, and eat!

 

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Star Fruit Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Add to fruit salads.
  • Use for tarts, preserves, chutney and stewed fruits.
  • Garnish chicken, pork or fish dishes.
  • Garnish beverages.
  • Add to your fruit smoothies.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Broiled Star Fruit with Vanilla Frozen Yogurt

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

500 grams starfruit -- (4 fruits)trimmed and each sliced into 8 stars

2 Tbsp lemon juice -- fresh

2 Tbsp light brown sugar

2 cups frozen yogurt sf, ff -- vanilla

 

Place a broiler rack 6 inches from source of heat. Preheat broiler.

Arrange star fruit slices on a baking sheet and brush with lemon juice.

Sprinkle with brown sugar. Broil until sugar bubbles and begins to darken,

about 2 to 3 minutes. Meanwhile, scoop frozen yogurt into 4 dessert

dishes. Top each serving with 4 star fruit slices. Serve immediately.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 73 Calories; trace Fat (4.6%

calories from fat); 2g Protein; 17g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 1mg

Cholesterol; 19mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Fruit; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 1 point per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Star Fruit Avocado Salad

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 cups lettuce leaves -- Romaine,torn

1 1/2 cups tomatoes -- about 2, sliced

1/2 cup onion -- red, sliced

1/2 cup avocado -- sliced

500 grams starfruit -- sliced

1 cup cucumber -- sliced

1 cup jicama slices

1/2 cup mushrooms -- sliced

 

On each of four salad plates, arrange a bed of lettuce. Layer the

remaining ingredients in the order listed. Drizzle with lemon vinaigrette

or your favorite dressing.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 120 Calories; 4g Fat (24.5%

calories from fat); 3g Protein; 22g Carbohydrate; 8g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 16mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 Vegetable; 1/2

Fruit; 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving. NOTE THE USE OF JICAMA IN THIS RECIPE, JANUARY'S FRUIT!

 

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Star Fruit Salad

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 starfruit

2 kiwi fruits

2 bananas

1 cup mango juice

1 cup vanilla yogurt, lowfat

 

Peel kiwi and banana, cut into medium size pieces. Slice star fruit into

¼-inch thickness. Combine all fruits in bowl. Add nectar over mixture.

Refrigerate for 3 hours. Top with vanilla yogurt.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 165 Calories; 1g Fat (7.3% calories

from fat); 4g Protein; 37g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 3mg

Cholesterol; 46mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Fruit; 0 Fat; 1/2 Other

Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 3 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

Share this post


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MARCH: EXOTIC WINTER FRUIT

 

 

EXOTIC WINTER FRUIT!

 

winter_exotic_h.jpg

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print-friendly Adobe Acrobat document* (PDF - 226K)

Exotic fruits are becoming more available throughout the year in the United States. Many of the fruits described below are grown in the Southern Hemisphere, where our winter is their summer. Importing fruits from countries such as New Zealand allows Americans the opportunity to try new fruits all year round.

 

Tamarillo

 

winter_exotic_03.jpgThe tamarillo is egg-shaped and is pointed at both ends with a green stem. The skin is tough and bitter and may be red, purple, amber, or golden yellow in color. The outer layer of apricot-colored flesh is slightly firm and the inside is filled with dark edible seeds that are slightly harder than those of a tomato. The flesh is tangy and tart, but flavorful. Tamarillos are native to South America, but most tamarillos sold in the United States are imported from New Zealand. This fruit is popular in South and Central America, the Caribbean, parts of Asia, and Australia. It is also commonly called a tree tomato.

 

Selection

Select fruit that is firm, unblemished and is heavy for its size. When ripe, tamarillos should be fragrant and should yield slightly to gentle pressure. Tamarillos are available from May to October in specialty stores and some supermarkets. They can occasionally be found out of season.

 

Storage

Tamarillos may be ripened at room temperature, then stored in the refrigerator or eaten once they are ripe. They last up to ten days in the refrigerator if wrapped in a plastic. Tamarillos may also be frozen if they are peeled and wrapped individually.

 

Preparation

Tamarillos should be peeled before eating or cooking. Blanching in boiling water for 2 to 3 minutes is often the easiest way to remove the skin if the fruit is not ripe. They are often eaten raw, when ripe. Dip in frozen orange juice concentrate to sweeten the fruit and add to fruit or vegetable salads. Tamarilos are also often made into jams, chutneys and relishes.

 

Feijoa

 

winter_exotic_02.jpgThe feijoa is also an egg-shaped fruit with a thin lime-green skin. The flesh inside is cream-colored and encases a jelly-like center. The texture is gritty, close to that of a pear. The flesh tastes like a combination of several other fruits, usually described as pineapple, guava, and strawberry. Some people report a taste similar to that of a quince or lemon. Feijoa is native to South America, but is now commercially grown in New Zealand and California. It is also commonly called a pineapple guava.

 

Selection

Select fruit that is fragrant and gives slightly to gentle pressure. Ripe feijoas are delicate, so take caution not to bruise the fruit. Imported feijoas are available from late March to June; while domestic ones reach the market in the fall. Feijoas are gaining in popularity and are becoming easier to find in supermarkets. They are already easy to find in specialty markets and can often be ordered out-of-season through several online merchants.

 

Storage

Ripe feijoas may be refrigerated, but they don’t have to be. Ripen feijoas in a paper bag at room temperature; to ripen quicker add an apple to the bag. Ripe feijoas normally last about 3 to 5 days. Feijoas may be frozen, but only if peeled and cooked into a puree.

 

Preparation

Feijoas are most often eaten raw. The fruit is ripe when it is slightly soft and the jellied inner section is clear. The fruit is unripe when the jelly is white and is spoiled when the jelly is brown. Unfortunately, this test of ripeness may only be determined once the fruit is opened. Peel the fruit before preparing, as the skin is bitter.

 

Red Banana

 

winter_exotic_01.jpgRed bananas are smaller in size than a common banana and the peel is a deep red or purple. It has a creamy white to pink flesh, with a slight raspberry-banana flavor. The overall taste is similar to a common yellow banana. They are imported from Costa Rica and are a favorite in Central America.

 

Selection

Select firm bananas free from bruises or cracks in the peel and look for a deep purple color. This indicates the banana is ripe. If the color of the peel is lighter, the banana is not ripe. As with common yellow bananas, red bananas will ripen in a couple of days at room temperature. Red bananas are available year round at specialty markets and larger supermarkets.

 

Storage

Store bananas at room temperature, do not refrigerate. Turn bananas occasionally and store them in an uncovered location.

 

Preparation

Peel fruit prior to eating. Red bananas are used in similar ways as common yellow bananas. They are most frequently eaten whole raw or chopped and added to desserts or fruit salads. Red bananas are one of varieties commonly used for store bought dried bananas.

 

Kiwano Melon

 

winter_exotic_06.jpgKiwano melon is an oval shaped fruit with horns on its peel. It has a bright orange and yellow skin with a pale yellow-green pulp inside. The flavor of the pulp is sweet and a bit tart with a flavor mix of bananas, lime and cucumber. Kiwano melon is native to southern and central Africa and is commonly known as an African horned melon. Most imported melons are now from New Zealand. California has began growing this melon, so a domestic product is available part of the year.

 

Selection

Select melons without any bruises or spots with a bright orange color. It is best to purchase a melon that has the horns intact, as damaged horns may be a sign of rough handling. Kiwano melons are available year round in specialty markets and supermarkets.

 

Storage

Unripe melons may be stored at room temperature for up to two weeks. Ripe melons will last about 3 to 4 days at room temperature. There is no need to refrigerate kiwano melon.

 

Preparation

winter_exotic_05.jpg There is no way to peel the skin off of the melon, so the fruit needs to be scooped out of the melon before using. The melon may be cut in half or into wedges to help extract the fruit pulp. The pulp may be eaten by itself, used as a topping for a sweet dessert or added to a fruit or green salad. The shell may be used as a serving dish once the pulp is removed, but the skin should not be eaten.

 

Guava

 

winter_exotic_04.jpgGuava is an oval shaped fruit that varies in size from a small egg to a medium apple. The thin skin may be yellow, red, purple or nearly black and the flesh ranges from a pale yellow to a bright red. Guava is sweet with a slight tart aftertaste. Its texture is firm; similar to an apple. Guava is native to South America, but is now commonly grown in California, Florida and Hawaii. It is also known as a Bangkok Apple or Guayaba.

 

Selection

Select fruit that gives to gentle pressure and is unblemished. Fresh guavas are often only available in the region near where they are grown, but may be ordered by mail. Canned guava products are available nationwide throughout the year in larger supermarkets.

 

Storage

Store ripe guavas in the refrigerator for up to a week. Green, unripe guavas should be stored at room temperature until ripe. Ripe guavas stored at room temperature will spoil quickly; normally within a couple of a days.

 

Preparation

The entire guava is edible. The rind and small seeds inside, along with the creamy flesh are often used in making jellies, preserves, and sauce. To be eaten raw, guava needs to be very ripe. Guava is typically sliced lengthwise into 5 or 6 slices and seeds discarded.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Exotic Winter Fruit Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

 

  • Add slices of tamarillo to your favorite sandwich for a tart twist.
  • Add feijoa to your favorite lowfat smoothie for a taste of the tropics.
  • Top your cereal with a red banana for a colorful change.
  • Top your nonfat yogurt with kiwano melon for a tangy treat.
  • Add guava to fruit salad for an added taste of sweetness.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Feijoa-Chicken Curry

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 Tablespoon olive oil

12 ounces chicken breasts -- skinned, boned, and cut into bite-sized chunks

5 1/2 cups carrots -- thinly sliced

1 cup bell pepper -- cubed

1 cup onion -- thinly sliced

1 clove garlic -- minced

4 feijoas -- peeled, halved lengthwise, and cut into slices (4 to 5)

1 Tbsp curry powder

1/4 tsp allspice

1/8 tsp pepper

1 Tbsp cornstarch

14 1/2 ounces chicken broth

 

In a skillet, heat 2 tablespoons oil. Sauté chicken 3 minutes or until

nearly done; remove from pan. Heat remaining oil in skillet; sauté

carrots, bell pepper, onion, and garlic for 5 minutes or till carrots are

nearly tender. Add chicken back to skillet with feijoas, curry powder,

salt, allspice, and pepper. Stir cornstarch into chicken broth; pour into

skillet with chicken mixture. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer,

covered, 20 minutes. Serve with rice (optional, not included in the

analysis).

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 303 Calories; 11g Fat (32.7%

calories from fat); 20g Protein; 33g Carbohydrate; 7g Dietary Fiber; 44mg

Cholesterol; 436mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 2 Lean Meat; 4 1/2

Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 1 Fat.

 

NOTES : 6 points per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Melon With Kiwano Melon Sauce

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 cup honeydew melon -- cut into chunks

1 cup watermelon -- cut into chunks

2 Kiwano melon

Sauce:

Pulp from 1 Kiwano Melon above

1/2 cup cantaloupe -- cut into chunks

2 tsp fresh mint -- chopped

1 tsp grated orange peel

1 tsp sugar

Fresh mint sprigs (optional garnish)

 

In a bowl, toss together honeydew and watermelon chunks. Halve both kiwano

melons lengthwise. Scoop out interior of first kiwano melon and add to

melon mixture. Scoop out interior of second horned melon and reserve for

making sauce. Divide melon mixture evenly among the kiwano melon shells.

 

For Sauce, Place reserved kiwano melon pulp in food processor or blender

with ½ cup cantaloupe chunks, mint, orange peel, and sugar. Cover and

process until smooth.

 

Pour sauce over fruit in shells; garnish with mint sprigs.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 39 Calories; trace Fat (5.6%

calories from fat); 1g Protein; 10g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 7mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 0 Other

Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : Kiwano has only 25 calories per melon.

 

The recipe is only one point per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Red Bananas with Fruit Salsa

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

6 medium banana, red

3 Tbsp brown sugar -- packed

1 Tbsp lemon juice

1/4 tsp vanilla extract

1 Tbsp mint leaves -- crushed

Fruit salsa:

3 large tangerines

1 large grapefruit

1 cup mango -- peeled and diced

2 Tbsp honey

3 Tbsp brewed orange tea

2 Tbsp walnuts -- chopped

 

Peel the red bananas and split in half. Place in a flat glass dish cut

side up. Combine the lime juice and vanilla, brushing the bananas with the

mixture. Generously spoon the brown sugar on the bananas.

 

Preheat broiler to high and place the sugar topped bananas under the

broiler for 2-3 minutes until they are well caramelized. Remove from the

broiler and cool for 1 minute before removing from the pan.

 

For the fruit salsa, peel the clementines and grapefruit and cut between

the membranes to separate the segments and remove the seeds. Place in a

bowl and add the mango. Add the honey, tea and nuts, mix well and chill.

 

To serve, divide the fruit salsa into small bowls. Place 2 halves of

banana brulee in each bowl, and garnish with fresh mint.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 159 Calories; 2g Fat (13.0%

calories from fat); 2g Protein; 36g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 5mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 0

Vegetable; 1 Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 1 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 3 points per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Tamarillo Pear Chutney

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 cup apple juice

1/4 cup vinegar -- white wine

1/3 cup brown sugar -- packed

5 tamarillo -- peeled and chopped

2 pears -- firm, ripe, peeled and chopped

1 cup onion -- peeled and chopped

1/3 cup raisins

1 Tbsp ginger -- chopped

1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

 

In a large saucepan, stir together juice, vinegar and brown sugar. Add

remaining ingredients; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer, cook,

stirring occasionally, about 20 minutes, or until fruit is very soft.

Drain off most of the juice. Cool; store in covered container in

refrigerator.

 

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 122 Calories; trace Fat (2.7%

calories from fat); 1g Protein; 31g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 7mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 1 1/2

Fruit; 0 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Tropical Fruit Salad with Guava Sauce

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 bananas -- sliced

1 pears -- ripe, sliced

4 kiwi fruit -- peeled and sliced

2 cups strawberries -- sliced

2 feijoa

2 Tbsp orange juice, frozen concentrate

1 guava -- ripe

 

Combine all of the ingredients, except for the juice and guava, in a large

serving bowl. Peel and slice the guava into quarters and place in a

blender with the orange juice concentrate. Puree until smooth. Pour the

mixture through a sieve to remove the seeds and pour over the fruit salad.

 

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 123 Calories; 1g Fat (6.0% calories

from fat); 2g Protein; 30g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 5mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Fruit; 0 Fat.

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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APRIL: ASIAN PEAR

 

 

ASIAN PEAR!

 

asianpear_h.jpg

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print-friendly Adobe Acrobat document* (PDF - 181K)

Asian pears are cousins to the pears that are typically seen in grocery stores, but this fruit is similar to an apple and its many names reflect that characteristic. Other names that this fruit goes by are: Chinese pear, Japanese pear, Sand, Nashi, and apple pear.

 

Asian PearServing size 122g

Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 50 Calories from Fat 5 Total Fat 0g0%Saturated Fat 0g0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Sodium 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 13g4% Dietary Fiber 4g16% Sugars 9gProtein 1gVitamin A0%Vitamin C8%Calcium0%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

Asian pears differ from the traditional European ones. These pears are usually round, firm to touch when ripe, and are ready to eat after harvest. Asian pears reach prime quality when they ripen on the tree, like an apple and peach. These pears will be crisp, juicy, and slightly sweet with some tartness, especially near the core.

 

While European pears have the bulbous bottoms and tapering tops, they are not ready to eat until they are slightly soft and must be picked during the green stage and ripen at room temperature. European pears will be soft and juicy, with a sweeter, mellower taste. European pears will be brown at the core and an unpleasant taste if they are tree-ripened.

 

There are several Asian pear varieties available. Japanese pears are more round in shape, while the Chinese pears are more oval or pyriform (pear-shaped).

 

In the United States, the Japanese type of Asian pear called 20th Century or Nijisseki is the most popular. It is easily identified with its round shape and smooth yellow skin. Other common varieties include the Japanese bronze-toned Hosui pear and the pear-shaped Ya Li, a pale-green Chinese variety.

 

Selection

 

Select the most fragrant and unbruised fruit with little to no brown spots. Ripe Asian pears are hard and do not soften. They are ready to eat when purchased.

 

Storage

 

Asian pears are known for keeping well. Store pears a week at room temperature or up to three months in the refrigerator.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Asian Pears Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

 

  • Enjoy eating fresh out of hand.
  • Use in salads, slaws, soups, and sandwiches.
  • Use Asian pears as you would with other pears and apples in cobblers and fruit crisps.
  • To prevent discoloration when cut, dip in a mixture of water and lemon juice.

 

 

Yay! Finally we have just ONE fruit, not many!

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Asian Pear Slaw with Chilies

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 cups celery -- sliced diagonally, 1/4" thick

4 Tbsp lime juice

4 Tbsp rice vinegar

1 tsp ginger root

6 Asian pears -- sliced 1/4-inch thick

1/2 cup scallions -- thinly sliced on diagonal

1/4 cup cilantro leaves, whole -- finely chopped

1 teaspoon jalapeno chile peppers -- finely chopped

 

Whisk together juice, vinegar, and ginger and stir in celery and remaining

ingredients with salt and pepper to taste. Let stand at room temperature

15 minutes before serving.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 65 Calories; trace Fat (4.3%

calories from fat); 1g Protein; 17g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 37mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Vegetable; 1 Fruit; 0 Fat; 0

Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 1 point per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Asian Salad with Sweet and Sour Vinaigrette

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

Salad:

1 papaya

1 guava

1 Asian pear

1 pound lettuce -- mixed and chopped

2 ounces Goat Cheese

Vinaigrette:

1 tsp mustard

2 tsp Balsamic vinegar

1 tsp soy sauce, low sodium

1 tsp honey

1/8 tsp black pepper -- ground

2 tablespoons olive oil

 

Combine mustard, balsamic vinegar, soy sauce, honey, salt and pepper in a

mixing bowl. Drizzle in olive oil, whisking to an emulsion. Set aside. Cut

papaya and guava into thin slices. Julienne the Asian pear. Put the spring

mix salad in a large bowl. Toss with dressing. Mound on a platter. Place

fruit slices on top. Sprinkle with chunks of goat cheese and serve.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 206 Calories; 12g Fat (51.7%

calories from fat); 7g Protein; 20g Carbohydrate; 6g Dietary Fiber; 15mg

Cholesterol; 128mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Lean Meat; 1

Vegetable; 1 Fruit; 2 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 4 points per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Fall Asian Pear Soup

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 Tbsp olive oil

2 cups Asian pears -- peeled and cubed

1/2 cup onion -- diced

1 can chicken broth -- (15 oz)

1 cup cottage cheese, lowfat

2 cups butternut squash -- peeled and cubed, cooked

1/2 cup mustard

1 tsp tarragon -- chopped

 

In a large sauce pan, place apple pear and onion with the oil. Cook until

tender. Set aside. In a food processor, blend the cottage cheese until

smooth, adding the apple pear mixture and ½ the chicken broth. Blend

together until smooth. Add remaining ingredients and blend until smooth,

but do not over blend. Pour into large saucepan to heat soup. Serve

immediately.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 119 Calories; 4g Fat (28.4%

calories from fat); 7g Protein; 15g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 2mg

Cholesterol; 533mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean Meat; 0

Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Jicama and Asian Pear Salad

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 cups romaine lettuce leaves -- shredded

2 cups Jicama -- julienne-sliced

2 Asian pears -- cored and chopped

1/2 cup Golden raisins

1/4 cup vinaigrette -- your choice

1/4 cup Apple juice

1/4 tsp five-spice powder

 

In a bowl, toss the shredded lettuce, jicama, Asian pears and golden

raisins until combined. For dressing, whisk together the salad dressing,

apple cider or juice, and five-spice powder or allspice until well mixed.

Drizzle over salad and toss well. Serve immediately.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 136 Calories; 6g Fat (34.1%

calories from fat); 2g Protein; 22g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 10mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 1

Fruit; 1 Fat.

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Poached Asian Pears in Raspberry Sauce

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

4 Asian pears

1 cup apple juice

1 cup white wine -- dry

1/2 cup water

Few strips of lemon or orange peel

Raspberry Sauce:

1 cup raspberries -- fresh or frozen, if frozen, thaw them

2 tbsp sugar

 

Core Asian pears if desired, or leave stem and core intact. In a saucepan,

combine the apple juice, wine, water, and lemon or orange peel. Place

pears in liquid. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, partially covered,

20 minutes, spooning liquid over pears frequently during cooking. (Pears

will still be firm after cooking.) Chill pears in liquid.

 

Meanwhile, prepare Raspberry Sauce: In a blender or food processor bowl,

place berries. Cover and process till smooth. Add sugar; process again. If

desired, strain sauce to remove seeds. Cover and chill sauce till needed.

 

To serve, spoon some of the Raspberry Sauce onto 4 dessert plates; place a

pear in center of sauce in each plate. Pass any remaining sauce to spoon

over pears.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 160 Calories; 1g Fat (3.5% calories

from fat); 1g Protein; 31g Carbohydrate; 7g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 6mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 1/2 Fruit; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 3 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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MAY: LIMES

 

 

 

 

 

LIMES!

 

lime_h.jpg

 

This is also available as a

print-friendly Adobe Acrobat document* (PDF - 222k)

Limes may be most famous for their historical benefits to sailors. Limes are packed with Vitamin C and were eaten on ships to prevent scurvy, a disease caused by that vitamin deficiency. In the eighteenth century, all British naval ships assigned to long journeys were required to carry limes. The nickname “limeys” for British sailors has continued to this day.

 

Limes were originally grown on the Indian subcontinent and were popularized in Europe about the time of the Crusades. In the United States, limes were established in what is now named Florida by the sixteenth century. Today limes are grown in Florida, the Southwest, and California.

 

LimesServing size 1 med. raw (67g)

 

 

Amounts Per Serving

% Daily Value

 

 

Calories 20 Total Fat 0g0%Sodium 0.75mg0%Potassium 75mg2%Total Carbohydrate 7g2% Dietary Fiber 2g8% Sugars less than 1 gram Protein less than 1 gram Vitamin A**Vitamin C35%Calcium**Iron***Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

**Contains less than 2 percent of the Daily Value of these nutrients.

 

 

 

 

 

Selection

 

Select limes that are glossy and light to deep green in color. Limes should have a thin, smooth skin and be heavy for their size. Small brown areas on the skin should not affect flavor, but large blemishes or soft spots indicate a damaged lime. Ripe limes are firm, but not hard. Avoid limes that have a yellowish skin or are too small. A hard shriveled skin is a sign of dryness, as is a coarse thick skin. Limes are available year round in most supermarkets.

 

 

Storage

 

Limes may be stored at room temperature or in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks. Limes store better in a plastic bag if placed in the refrigerator and those stored at room temperature will yield more juice. Take care to keep limes out of direct sunlight as they will shrivel and become discolored.

 

 

Varieties

 

lime_01.jpgThe majority of limes are part of the Tahitian strain, believed to have originated in Tahiti. There are two common varieties of that strain: Persian and Bearss. The Persion is egg-shaped and contains seeds. The Bearss is smaller and seedless. Key limes are smaller and rounder than the Tahitian strain and have a higher acid content. These limes are mostly used in baking.

 

 

Preparation

 

Wash well before using, even if you are only using the juice. Limes are usually eaten raw, but may be included in baked or grilled dishes. Many recipes call for fresh lime juice. To juice by hand, roll the lime on a firm surface before squeezing out the juice.

 

Limes are also often used as garnish. Simply slice the lime in half and slice into several sections. Limes or lime juice are a great salt substitute and add a tangy flavor.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Limes Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Marinate fish in lime juice for a great flavor and serve topped with lime slices.
  • Make limeade instead of the usual lemonade for a fruity summery treat.
  • Include lime in your citrus sorbet for a change.
  • Add thick slices of lime to make tangy summer kebabs on the grill.
  • Garnish a fruit plate or salad with limes to add color.
  • Use in tea as you would a lemon.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Black Bean Soup with Lime and Cumin

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

4 cups black beans, cooked

1 Tbsp olive oil

1 Tbsp cumin

1 cup onions -- chopped

1 cup carrots -- sliced

2 cloves garlic

1/2 cup red bell pepper -- chopped

4 cups vegetable broth

1/4 cup chipotle peppers -- or canned green chilies

1/4 cup lime juice

2 tablespoons lime juice

 

Heat olive oil in a nonstick or heavy-bottomed frying pan over medium

heat. When hot, add whole cumin and brown it. Take caution not to burn it.

Add chopped onions, carrots, garlic and bell pepper and cook slowly until

browned. Puree the beans with 4 cups stock in a blender or food processor.

Add the vegetable mixture, ½ canned chipotle chiles, ¼ cup plus 2 Tbs lime

juice, and salt to taste. Process until velvety smooth. If the soup is too

thick, thin it with more stock. Garnish each serving with a slice of lime

floating in the middle and a sprinkling of finely chopped cilantro.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 314 Calories; 6g Fat (16.0%

calories from fat); 15g Protein; 53g Carbohydrate; 14g Dietary Fiber; 2mg

Cholesterol; 1096mg Sodium. Exchanges: 3 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Lean Meat; 1

Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 1 Fat.

 

NOTES : 6 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Lime and Honeydew Punch

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 small honeydew melon

1/2 cup red grapes -- seedless

1/2 cup lime juice -- freshly squeezed

3 Tbsp splenda

2 cups sparkling water

 

Cut melon in half, scoop out seeds, peel, and cut into 1-inch cubes. Wash

grapes well and remove stems. Freeze melon and grapes for one hour.

Combine frozen melon and grapes with lime juice and sugar in a blender.

Puree until smooth, adding water as needed. Serve immediately.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 133 Calories; trace Fat (2.3%

calories from fat); 2g Protein; 36g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 33mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 1/2 Fruit.

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Lime Shrimp Kebabs

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 2 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

16 large shrimp -- uncooked, deveined,

3 large limes

2 cloves garlic -- crushed and peeled

1/4 tsp black pepper

2 tsp olive oil

2 Tbsp cilantro -- cleaned and chopped

10 medium cherry tomatoes -- rinsed and dried

10 small mushrooms -- wiped clean and stems removed

 

In a glass measuring cup, squeeze limes, yielding 1/4 cup of juice. Add

the garlic, pepper, olive oil, and cilantro and stir. Place the shrimp in

a medium bowl and pour the cilantro lime marinade over the shrimp. Let the

shrimp marinate for 10 to 15 minutes in the refrigerator (do not let them

marinate for more than 30 minutes as the acid of the juice will alter the

texture of the shrimp). While waiting, alternate cherry tomatoes,

mushrooms, and shrimp on four skewers.

 

Grill the skewers over a medium heat for 3 to 4 minutes on each side until

the shrimp are just cooked through.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 171 Calories; 6g Fat (28.7%

calories from fat); 14g Protein; 21g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 73mg

Cholesterol; 89mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1 1/2 Lean Meat; 2

Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 1 Fat.

 

NOTES : 3 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Pineapple Limeade

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 medium pineapple -- peeled

2 medium limes -- peeled and seeded

2 Tbsp sugar

3 cups sparkling water -- or 0 calorie club soda

 

 

Extract juice from the pineapple and limes, using a juicer or juice

extractor. Mix juices and sugar: refrigerate until chilled. Just before

serving, stir in the club soda or sparkling water and serve over ice.

Garnish with lime slices if desired.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 92 Calories; 1g Fat (4.9% calories

from fat); 1g Protein; 24g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 2mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Fruit; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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JUNE: Pluots and Apriums

 

 

 

 

 

PLUOTS© AND APRIUMS©!

 

pluot_h.jpg

*Pluot® and Aprium® are registered trademarks of Zaiger Genetics, Modesto, California

 

Pluots are complex hybrid fruits that are part plum and part apricot in heritage. These fruits were originally invented in the late 20th century by Floyd Zaiger and are now grown in parts of Washington and California. Pluots have a majority of plum parentage and therefore, have smooth skin like plums. Some varieties of pluots are sometimes called interspecific plums, or dinosaur eggs. The pluot is often confused with the aprium which is another plum and apricot hybrid with mostly apricot heritage. Like apricots, apriums have slightly fuzzy skin. Pluots and apriums are known for their sweetness and flavor; the sugar content of these fruits is much higher than that of a plum or apricot alone.

 

Pluot and Aprium nutritional information is not available at this time.

Plum

Serving Size 1 quince (132g) Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 70 Calories from Fat 5 Total Fat 1g2%Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 5mg0%Total Carbohydrate 17g6% Dietary Fiber 2g8% Sugars 13gProtein 1gVitamin A8%Vitamin C20%Calcium0%Iron0%Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

Apricot

Serving Size (114g) Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 50 Calories from Fat 5 Total Fat 0g0%Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 13g4% Dietary Fiber 3g12% Sugars 10gProtein 2gVitamin A60%Vitamin C20%Calcium2%Iron4%Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

Availability

 

Pluot and aprium season stretches from May to September. Pluots can be found mostly in milder climates.

 

pluot_01.jpgSelection

 

Pluots and apriums should be plump and firm. Avoid pluots that are green, blemished, or have broken skin.

 

Storage

 

Pluots and apriums should be ripened at room temperature and then refrigerated. Pluots can be ripened in a brown paper bag at room temperature.

 

Preparation

 

Fruit should be washed well and dried before consumption. To remove pit, cut the fruit in half. Pluots and apriums can be eaten fresh or cooked.

 

Varieties

 

pluot_03.jpgApproximately 20 varieties of pluots have been developed and bred by Zaiger Genetics. Each variety contains a different percentage of plum and apricot parentage. These varieties vary in size, skin color, and flesh color. The skin can be solid, striped, or speckled and skin colors range from yellow-green to black. Pluot flesh ranges from white to red in color.

 

There is only one variety of aprium currently on the market. The Honey Rich interspecific is bright orange and has bright orange flesh.

 

Pluot varieties include:

 

  • Candy Stripe: medium, pink-yellow striped, with very sweet and juicy flesh.
  • Cherry: small, bright red skin with white flesh.
  • Dapple Dandy: large sweet with pale green to yellow, red-spotted skin, red or pink juicy flesh.
  • Flavorella: round, medium-sized, golden-yellow, with sweet and juicy flesh.
  • Flavor Heart: very large, black with a heart shape, and yellow flesh.
  • Flavor King: very sweet, medium or large, with red-purple skin and red flesh.
  • Flavorosa: very sweet or tart, medium-sized, flat round dark-purple fruit with red flesh.
  • Flavor Prince: large round and purple, with red flesh.
  • Flavor Rich: medium-sweet, large black round fruit with orange flesh.
  • Flavor Supreme: medium or large, greenish purple skin, juicy red flesh.
  • Flavor Queen: large light-green to yellow, very juicy.
  • Red Ray: medium, bright red with dense, sweet orange flesh.

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Pluots and Apriums Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

 

  • Use pluots and apriums in sauces to pour over waffles or pancakes.
  • Substitute pluots for plums in recipes.
  • Use pluots and apriums as a topping for yogurt or as dessert.
  • Add sliced pluots or apriums to your next salad.
  • Add pluots or apriums to your favorite cereal.
  • Make a pluot of aprium crisp for dessert.
  • Serve pluots over low calorie ice cream.

 

 

 

I must insert a note here, these fruits may not be available to everyone. In the recipes to follow, you may use either plums or apricots at your discretion as a subsitution. Also, most areas of the country actually DO carry pluots, they just call them either 'white plums' or 'white meat plums' because they look just like a regular plum but have white flesh.

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Aprium Muffins

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 9 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 box muffin mix -- (14 ounce) preferably oat bran muffins

3/4 cup apple juice

1 1/2 cups apricots -- chopped and pitted **

3/4 cup raisins

 

Preheat oven to 425 ºF. Lightly coat about 9 muffin cups with nonstick

spray. In medium bowl, combine muffin mix and juice until just moistened.

Stir in apriums and raisins. Spoon batter into muffin cups full. Bake 14

minutes or until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Remove

muffins from pan and cool on wire rack.

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 58 Calories; trace Fat (2.4%

calories from fat); 1g Protein; 15g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 2mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Fruit.

 

NOTES : These muffins are one point each!

 

**This is where you subsitute the apriums.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

California Fresh Fruit Kebobs with Lemon and Cayenne

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 12 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

6 plums -- halved and pitted **

6 peaches -- halved and pitted

6 nectarines -- halved and pitted

2 lemons -- juiced

1 tsp cayenne pepper

mint sprigs (optional)

 

Cut each half of fruit into thirds. Place fruit in medium bowl, add lemon

juice and cayenne pepper; mix well. Marinate fruit for 1 hour. On a

skewer, alternate fruit wedges; chill. Garnish with mint sprig, if

desired.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 75 Calories; 1g Fat (6.3% calories

from fat); 1g Protein; 19g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; trace Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1 Fruit; 0 Fat.

 

NOTES : **This is where you subsitute pluots for the plums.

 

1 point per kabob.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Confetti plum (pluot)-pasta salad

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

8 ounces pasta -- corkscrew works best, uncooked

1/2 medium red bell pepper -- cut into strips

3/4 cup jicama -- peeled and sliced

1/2 cup red onion -- chopped

8 plums -- sliced **

2 Tbsp pimiento -- diced

1 tsp ginger root -- finely grated

3 Tbsp white wine vinegar -- or rice vinegar

1 Tbsp vegetable oil

1/8 tsp salt

1/8 tsp freshly ground black pepper

 

Cook the pasta according to the package directions. Drain. Rinse briefly

under cold water and drain. In a large bowl, toss together the pasta, red

and yellow bell peppers, jicama, onion, and pluots.

 

In a small bowl, whisk together all the basil, pimento, ginger, vinegar,

oil, salt, and pepper until blended. Drizzle the dressing over the salad

and toss evenly until coated.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 224 Calories; 3g Fat (13.6%

calories from fat); 6g Protein; 43g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 49mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 1/2

Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : **This is where you subsitute pluots for the plums.

 

4 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Shrimp and Pluot Stir Fry

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 2 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 tsp safflower oil

1 clove garlic -- minced

1/2 tsp ginger -- grated

2 green onions -- chopped

1 tsp cornstarch

1/4 cup chicken broth

2 Tbsp sherry

1 tsp soy sauce

1 tsp brown sugar

1/2 pound shrimp -- shelled, de-veined

4 plums -- sliced**

4 ounces waterchestnuts, canned

1/4 pound broccoli -- diagonally sliced

 

Combine oil, garlic, ginger and onions in a microwave-safe casserole. Cook

on high 30 seconds. Add cornstarch, chicken broth, sherry, soy sauce and

brown sugar. Microwave on high for 1 minute. Stir in remaining

ingredients. Cover, cook on high 2 to 3 minutes, stirring once.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 297 Calories; 5g Fat (16.7%

calories from fat); 27g Protein; 33g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 173mg

Cholesterol; 453mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 3 1/2 Lean Meat; 2

Vegetable; 1 Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : **subsitute pluots here.

 

6 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Summer Fruit Chicken Salad with Mustard Dressing

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 cups romaine lettuce leaves -- torn

12 ounces chicken breasts, no skin, no bone, R-T-C -- cooked, shredded

2 nectarines -- sliced

2 peaches -- sliced

2 plums -- sliced*

2 apricots -- sliced**

2 tsp olive oil

2 Tbsp vinegar -- white

2 Tbsp Dijon-style mustard

2 tsp sugar -- or Splenda

 

Divide lettuce among 4 salad bowls. Divide sliced fruit and shredded

chicken. Place on top of lettuce. To prepare dressing, combine oil,

vinegar, mustard and sugar in a jar. Tighten lid on jar; shake well.

Drizzle dressing over salad.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 232 Calories; 6g Fat (20.9%

calories from fat); 23g Protein; 25g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 52mg

Cholesterol; 149mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 1/2 Lean Meat; 1/2 Vegetable; 1

Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : *subsitute pluots here

**subsitute apriums here

 

5 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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JULY: NECTARINES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

nectarine_h.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commonly showcased side by side with peaches, nectarines are a similar, but yet different fruit. The best way to identify the difference between a nectarine and peach is by the lack of fuzz on the nectarine.

 

Nectarines, like peaches, most likely originated in China more than 2,000 years ago and were cultivated in ancient Persia, Greece and Rome. They were grown in Great Britain in the late 16th or early 17th centuries, and were introduced to America by the Spanish. Today, California grows over 95% of the nectarines produced in the United States.

 

Nectarines are smaller and smooth skinned golden yellow with large blushes of red. Their yellow flesh has a noticeable pink tinge, with a distinct aroma and a more pronounced flavor. There are more than 100 varieties of nectarine, in freestone and clingstone varieties. In freestone types the flesh separates from the 'pit' easily, while clingstone types cling to the 'pit.' Nectarines are more delicate than peaches and bruise very easily.

 

Nectarines are a good source of vitamin C and low in calories with no sodium or cholesterol.

 

 

Selection

 

NectarineServing Size (140g)

Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 70 Calories from Fat 5 Total Fat 1g1% Saturated Fat 0g0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Sodium 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 16g5% Dietary Fiber 2g8% Sugars 12gProtein 1gVitamin A4%Vitamin C15%Calcium0%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

Ripe fruit are fragrant and give, slightly, to the touch. If they are a under-ripe, leave them at room temperature for 2–3 days to ripen. Look for fruit with smooth unblemished skin. Avoid extremely hard or dull colored fruits and soft fruit with soft, wrinkled, punctured skin.

 

 

Storage

 

Nectarines keep for 5 days if stored in a plastic bag in the coldest part of your refrigerator.

 

 

Preparation

 

Nectarines can be used and prepared in the same ways as peaches, with no need to peel because they have no fuzz. Leave the skins on when making pies, cobblers and fresh fruit salads, etc.

 

 

Availability

 

California nectarines are available from late April and to late August. Almost all of the nectarines available are in California. Chiliean Nectarines are available from late December through early March.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Nectarines Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Bake peeled, halved, pitted fruit, cut-side up in a baking pan sprinkled with honey and cinnamon and cooked until tender.
  • Grilled nectarines are a wonderful tasty treat! Be sure to brush the fruit with fruit juices and cook until it is heated through.
  • Poached nectarines in fruit juice or wine and cook until tender…a simple, elegant way to end a meal.
  • Nectarines make a good substitute in any recipe that calls for peaches or apricots.
  • Puree ripe nectarines with skim milk, non-fat yogurt, or orange juice for a tasty breakfast treat.
  • Serve pancakes, waffles, or French toast with sliced or chopped nectarines.
  • Add cut up nectarines to your favorite fruit salad.
  • Serve baked nectarines with baked chicken or ham as delicious side dish.

RECIPES:

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Broiled Pork Chops with Warm Nectarines

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

12 ounces pork loin chops -- trimmed of extra fat

1/4 tsp coriander seeds

1/4 tsp cumin

1/2 tsp black pepper -- freshly ground

1/4 cup cider vinegar

1 tsp rum (optional)

12 ounces nectarines -- pitted, peeled and halved

Put the pork chops, coriander, cumin, and pepper in a sealable plastic bag

and add the vinegar and optional rum. Fasten the bag and place in the

refrigerator for 8 hours or overnight to marinate. When ready to cook,

preheat a broiler. Place the chops on a broiling pan, along with the

nectarines. Place the pan about 6 inches below the heat source. Broil 3 to

4 minutes per side. Remove and serve hot.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 114 Calories; 3g Fat (25.5%

calories from fat); 12g Protein; 10g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 27mg

Cholesterol; 22mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1 1/2 Lean Meat;

1/2 Fruit; 0 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Nectarine & Almond Breakfast Gratin

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 Tbsp butter -- cut into small pieces, plus an additional teaspoon

5 Tbsp sugar

1/4 cup Egg Beaters® 99% egg substitute

1/4 cup milk, skim

1/4 cup flour, all-purpose

1/8 tsp salt

2 cup nectarines -- thinly sliced

2 Tbsp almonds -- coarsely chopped

Preheat an oven to 425 °F.

Using 1 teaspoon of the butter, grease an 8- or 9-inch gratin dish or

other shallow baking dish, then sprinkle it with 1 tablespoon of the

sugar. Arrange the fruit in the dish. In a bowl, combine the egg, milk, 1

tablespoon of the sugar, and the salt and whisk together. When well mixed,

gradually whisk in the flour. Pour this cream-like batter over the fruit.

Sprinkle the remaining 3 tablespoons of sugar, the butter, and the almonds

over the top.

Bake until the batter is set, the butter melted, and the fruit cooked

through, about 12 to 15 minutes.

Let stand about 10 minutes before cutting into wedges to serve.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 186 Calories; 6g Fat (26.2%

calories from fat); 4g Protein; 32g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 8mg

Cholesterol; 126mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Lean Meat;

1/2 Fruit; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1 Fat; 1 Other Carbohydrates.

NOTES : Nectarines and almonds are a classic French combination

and in this simple, but elegant dish they are prepared in

a gratin. Essentially a thin, crepe-like batter is poured

over the nuts and fruits, just enough to make a base that

holds them together so they can be sliced. The fruit is

dotted with butter, sprinkled with sugar and baked until

the batter sets.

 

4 points per serving.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Nectarine and Basil Bagel

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 2 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

3/4 cup nectarines -- thinly sliced

6 ounces bagels -- split (two bagels)

4 Tbsp Neufchatel cheese

1/4 cup basil leaves -- about 12 large leaves

1/4 tsp black pepper -- cracked

Toast bagels and spread with cream cheese (1 tablespoon per bagel half).

Top with basil leaves and nectarine slices. Sprinkle with pepper.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 297 Calories; 5g Fat (14.9%

calories from fat); 11g Protein; 52g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 11mg

Cholesterol; 511mg Sodium. Exchanges: 3 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1/2

Fruit; 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 6 points. If you use a Weight Watcher type

bagel, of one or two points you will reduce the points per

serving to three points.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Nectarine Whirl

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 1 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1/2 cup nectarines -- cut in chunks

1/2 cup milk, skim

1/2 cup orange juice

1 Tbsp honey

1/4 tsp Almond extract

2 ice cubes -- crushed

Place all ingredients in a blender. Blend at high speed for 15 seconds.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 198 Calories; 1g Fat (3.4% calories

from fat); 6g Protein; 44g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 2mg

Cholesterol; 66mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 1/2 Fruit; 1/2 Non-Fat Milk; 1

Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 4 points per serving. This is a large size serving.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Santa Fe Chilled Nectarine Soup

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 5 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 lbs nectarines -- (8 small), cut up

1 cup apple juice

1 cup cranberry juice, low calorie

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp red pepper flakes

1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar

1/4 cup cilantro leaves, whole

Combine nectarines with juices, salt, pepper flakes and vinegar in

electric blender. Whirl until smooth and blended. Add cilantro leaves and

whirl in a stop-and-go fashion a few seconds, just to chop.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 114 Calories; 1g Fat (5.8% calories

from fat); 2g Protein; 28g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 217mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 1/2 Fruit.

Serving Ideas : Makes 5 (1-cup) servings

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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AUGUST: EDIBLE CACTUS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

cactus_h.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edible cactus is also known as nopales (no-PAH-les), nopalitos or cactus pads. This vegetable is popular in Mexico and other Central American countries, parts of Europe, the Middle East, India, North Africa and Australia. Its popularity is increasing in the United States where it can be found at Mexican grocery stores, specialty produce markets and farmer’s markets.

 

Edible cactus is characterized by its fleshy oval leaves (typically called pads or paddles) of the nopal (prickly pear) cactus.

 

With a soft but crunchy texture that also becomes a bit sticky (not unlike okra) when cooked, edible cactus tastes similar to a slightly tart green bean, asparagus, or green pepper.

 

Cactus pads contain beta carotene, iron, some B vitamins, and are good sources of both vitamin C and calcium.

 

What is the difference between cactus leaves (edible cactus or nopales) and the prickly pear? As part of the cactus plant, the prickly pear is a fruit that is 2 to 4 inches long and shaped like an avocado. Its skin is coarse and thick, not unlike an avocados and it ranges in color from yellow or orange to magenta or red. Tubercles with small prickly spines can be found on the prickly pear’s skin. This fruit’s flesh, which ranges in color also from yellow to dark red, is sweet and juicy with crunchy seeds throughout.

 

The prickly pear can be diced like pineapple and used as a topping on yogurt or cereal or blended into a smoothie.

 

 

 

 

Availability, Selection, and Storage

 

CactusServing Size: 86g

 

Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 15 Calories from Fat 0 Total Fat 0g0%Sodium 20mg1%Total Carbohydrate 3g1% Dietary Fiber --g--% Sugars --gProtein 1gVitamin A8%Vitamin C15%Calcium15%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

Edible cactus is available year-round with a peak in the mid-spring and the best season from early spring through late fall. When buying edible cactus, choose small, firm, pale green cacti with no wrinkling. Be sure to pick cacti that are not limp or dry. Very small paddles may require more cleaning because their larger proportion of prickers and eyes.

Edible cactus can be refrigerated for more than a week if wrapped tightly in plastic.

 

Edible cactus is also sold as:

  • Canned — pickled or packed in water
  • Acitrones — candied nopales, packed in sugar syrup and available in cans or jars.

Preparation

 

The edible cactus you buy should be de-spined though you will need to trim the “eyes,” to remove any remaining prickers, and outside edges of the pads with a vegetable peeler. Trim off any dry or fibrous areas and rinse thoroughly to remove any stray prickers and sticky fluid.

 

Edible cactus can be eaten raw or cooked. To cook, steam over boiling water for just a few minutes (if cooked too long they will lose their crunchy texture). Then slice and eat! Cactus can also be cut and sautéed in butter or oil for a few minutes.

 

Steamed cactus can be added to scrambled eggs and omelets, or diced fresh and added to tortillas. They can also be substituted for any cooked green in most dishes.

 

The pads can be served as a side dish or cooled and used in salads. They taste especially good with Mexican recipes that include tomatoes, hot peppers and fresh corn.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Edible Cactus Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Cut up and add to salads.
  • Dice and add to your favorite salsa recipe or any store bought salsa.
  • Cut up and add to any corn side dish.
  • Dice edible cactus and add to couscous along with diced tomatoes.
  • Add to your favorite burrito along with lettuce and tomatoes.

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Nopales and Couscous Salad

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 1/2 cups couscous -- measure 1 1/2 cups and then cook it

3/4 lb prickly pear -- prickers removed (also called nopales)

1/3 cup lemon juice

1 tsp salt

5 tablespoons chicken broth, ff, reduced sodium

1 1/2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 small red onion -- coarsely diced (about 3/4 cup)

1 fresh chili pepper

2 Tbsp cilantro

 

Cook couscous according to package directions. Steam nopales about 4

minutes. Cool and cut into ¼ inch wide strips. Combine lemon juice, salt,

chicken broth and olive oil; blend. Toss with nopales and onion. Remove

stem and seeds from chili, then dice into small pieces. Add to nopales and

toss. Combine with couscous and cilantro and mix well. Cover and chill

until serving time.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 338 Calories; 6g Fat (15.7%

calories from fat); 9g Protein; 62g Carbohydrate; 6g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 547mg Sodium. Exchanges: 3 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat;

1/2 Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 1 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 6 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Sautéed Nopales, Peppers and Corn

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 large red bell pepper

1 large green bell pepper

1 large onion

1 Tbsp butter

2 cups corn -- fresh ears

1/2 lb prickly pear -- deprickered, cut in 1/4- to 1/2-inch dice (also known as Nopales)

finely minced cilantro or parsley

 

Halve peppers, then remove seeds and stems. Cut into ¼-½ inch squares.

Cut onions the same size. Cook both vegetables in butter in a heavy pan

over moderate heat until just softened.

 

Shuck corn, then cut from cob to make 2 cups. Add edible cactus and corn

to peppers and onion; stir over high heat until vegetables are cooked

through, but firm-tender, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle with herbs and serve

hot.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 136 Calories; 4g Fat (24.6%

calories from fat); 4g Protein; 25g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 8mg

Cholesterol; 45mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 1 Vegetable; 1/2

Fruit; 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 2 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Scrambled Eggs with Edible Cactus

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 Tbsp pine nuts

1/4 lb prickly pear -- de-prickered, rinsed, and cut into 1/4 inch squares

2 Tbsp chili pepper -- or jalapeno, or subsitute diced tomato

3 1/4 cups egg beaters® 99% egg substitute

salt and pepper to taste

cooking spray

 

Toast nuts in a skillet over low heat until lightly browned, stirring

often; reserve. Spray nonstick pan with cooking spray. Stir in cactus;

toss gently over moderate heat until crisp-tender (about 4-5 minutes).

Stir in chili-pepper.

 

Blend eggs, adding salt to taste. Add eggs to cactus and chilies. Stir

often until set. Sprinkle with pepper and pine nuts and serve hot.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 116 Calories; 2g Fat (18.3%

calories from fat); 17g Protein; 6g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 278mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 2 Lean Meat; 0

Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 2 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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My goodness~! Please excuse me. I first put the veggies where the fruit should be and then I added a reply that I didn't need! Not one of my better days!


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

Share this post


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SEPTEMBER: FIGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fig_h.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figs, one of mankind’s oldest fruits, is only now receiving its due attention in homes across the United States. Although considered a fruit, the fig is actually a flower inverted into itself. They are the only fruit to ripen on the tree. Originally native from Turkey to northern India, the fig fruit spread to many of the Mediterranean countries. The primary producers of dried figs today are the United States, Turkey, Greece, and Spain. This highly nutritious fruit arrived in the United States by Spanish missionaries settling in Southern California in 1759. Fig trees were soon planted throughout the state.

 

One serving of figs is 40 grams, about ¼ cup, or about 3 Calimyrna figs or about 4 to 5 Mission figs. Figs are high in fiber, providing 20% of the Daily Value — more dietary fiber per serving than any other common dried or fresh fruit.

 

FigsServing Size: 40g

 

Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 30 Calories from Fat 0 Total Fat 0g0% Saturated Fat 0g0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Sodium 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 7g2% Dietary Fiber 1g4% Sugars 3gProtein 0gVitamin A2%Vitamin C2%Calcium2%Iron0%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

Varieties

 

There are hundreds of fig varieties but the following are most commonly found in today’s markets.

 

The Calimyrna Fig: Is known for its nut-like flavor and golden skin. This type is commonly eaten as is.

 

The Mission Fig: Was named for the mission fathers who planted the fruit along the California coast. This fig is a deep purple which darkens to a rich black when dried.

 

The Kadota Fig: Is the American version of the original Italian Dattato fig, that is thick-skinned with a creamy amber color when ripe. Practically seedless, this fig is often canned and dried.

 

The Brown Turkey Fig: has copper-colored skin, often with hints of purple, and white flesh that shades to pink in the center. This variety is used exclusively for the fresh fig market.

 

Fig varieties and photos courtesy of the California Fig Advisory Board

 

 

Availability

 

Fresh figs are available July through September. Dried figs are never out of season, and are available all year. You can find them in your favorite grocery store in the produce or dried fruit section.

 

 

Selection

 

Look for figs that are soft and smell sweet. Handle carefully because their fragile skins bruise easily.

 

 

Storage

 

Store fully ripened figs in the refrigerator up to 2 days; bring to room temperature before serving.

 

 

Using Dried Figs As a Replacement For Fat in Your Recipes

 

Dried figs are excellent replacement for fat in baked goods. Just remember when using dried figs to replace shortening or oil in baking do not overmix or overbake. Use only half of the normal amount of shortening, margarine, butter or oil, in a recipe when using dried puree. For instance, if 1 cup of margarine is called for, use only ½ cup. Then use ½ of the fig puree. Here’s a simple fig puree recipe to include in your baking recipes.

 

Fig Puree

Makes about 1½cups

 

Ingredients

 

 

 

 

2 cups dried figs

 

 

 

¾ cup water

2 tsp vanilla

 

 

 

 

Puree figs, water and vanilla in blender or food processor. Use as directed.

 

 

 

 

Nutritional analysis per serving: Calories 178, Protein 2g, Fat 1g, Calories From Fat 4%, Cholesterol 0mg, Carbohydrates 44g, Fiber 9g, Sodium 9mg.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Figs Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Take some figs in a plastic bag to the office, to school, to the game or park, for a quick snack. They are easy to eat and satisfies a sweet tooth.
  • Keep a container of figs in a desk drawer at work, to get rid of late afternoon munchies, or to include during your coffee break.
  • Slice a few figs and add to your tossed green salads. They add sweetness and texture, as well as fiber.
  • Serve mashed or cubed winter squash or sweet potatoes with some chopped figs. The figs are rich on their own, so skip the butter or margarine.
  • Use fig puree as a fat substitute in recipes.

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Ricotta Figs

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

12 figs -- freshly ground

1/2 cup ricotta cheese, part skim milk

2 Tablespoons honey -- *see Note

4 tablespoons Splenda

1 tsp lemon peel -- grated

1 tsp orange peel -- grated

3/4 tsp vanilla

2 Tbsps pistachio nuts

 

Remove stem ends from figs and cut each in half lengthwise. Combine

ricotta, honey, lemon peel, orange peel, and vanilla in a small bowl until

well blended. Mound mixture on fig halves. Garnish with chopped nuts.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 212 Calories; 5g Fat (19.2%

calories from fat); 5g Protein; 41g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 9mg

Cholesterol; 41mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Lean Meat; 2

Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : The original recipe calls for 6 tablespoons honey. If you

subsitute this for the Splenda, the points will be 5

 

with the Splenda, 4 points per serving.

If you love fresh figs, this is well, well worth the points! Or, just eat one half serving which is three halves for 2 points.

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Rosemary Chicken With Fig-Orange Sauce

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 package dried figs -- (8 oz)

1/2 cup orange juice

12 ounces chicken breast, no skin, no bone, R-T-C

2 Tbsps honey

2 Tbsps Dijon mustard

1 ounce ham -- 4 very thin slices, procuitto is good for this

1 Tbsp butter

1/2 cup chicken broth, ff, reduced sodium

1 tsp cornstarch

1 tsp orange peel -- grated

1 Tbsp rosemary -- chopped fresh or 2 tsp. dried

 

Cut stems from figs and cut into quarters. Place figs and orange juice in

a small microwave-safe bowl. Cover and microwave on high 1 minute. Set

aside. Place each chicken breast between 2 sheets of plastic wrap and

pound until thin. Combine honey and mustard. Spread 2-3 tsps on each

chicken breast; top with one slice of prosciutto. Place about six fig

pieces in center of chicken. Reserve orange juice and remaining figs. Fold

in sides and ends of breast; secure with toothpick. In skillet over medium

high heat, melt butter. Add chicken and cook 4 minutes on each side.

Combine broth, cornstarch, orange peel and rosemary with reserved orange

juice and figs; pour over chicken. Cook covered 2-3 minutes until sauce is

slightly thickened. Remove toothpicks and serve.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 206 Calories; 6g Fat (27.4%

calories from fat); 21g Protein; 16g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 64mg

Cholesterol; 264mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 3 Lean Meat; 1/2

Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 4 points per serving.

 

I can't wait to try this one! It sounds so yummy!


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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OCTOBER: PERSIMMONS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

persimmon_h.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Persimmons origins go back to ancient China. Fate intervened in the 1880’s when a United States Commander brought back a native Japanese persimmon variety to Washington, D.C. Now, persimmons are grown in California where hundreds of different varieties flourish. This brightly colored, glossy orange red skinned fruit is an excellent source of vitamin A, a good source of vitamin C, and rich in fiber.

 

Although there are countless different varieties of persimmons, only two are commercially available. There are distinguishable by their shape.

 

Hachiya: This type of persimmon makes up approximately 90 percent of the available fruit. It is identifiable by its acorn like shape. This persimmon is tart until it becomes soft ripe.

 

Fuyu: This persimmon is gaining popularity here as it is in Japan. Similar in color, but looking like a squashed tomato, this variety is smaller, sweeter, and is edible while still firm.

 

PersimmonsServing Size: 168

 

Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 120 Calories from Fat 5 Total Fat 0g0% Saturated Fat 0g0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Sodium 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 31g10% Dietary Fiber 6g24% Sugars 25gProtein 1gVitamin A70%Vitamin C20%Calcium2%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

Availability, Selection, Storage, Preparation

 

Persimmons are widely available September through December, with a peak during November.

 

Choose persimmons with deep red undertones. Look for persimmons that are round, plump, and have glossy and smooth skin. Avoid fruits with blemishes, bruises or cracked skin and missing the green leaves at the top. Select ripe persimmons only if you plan to eat them immediately. Otherwise, buy firmer fruits and allow them to ripen.

 

Ripen persimmons at room temperature in a paper bag with an apple or banana. Store them in the refrigerator when ripe. Be sure to eat the fruit as soon as possible because overripe persimmons quickly turn to a mushy texture.

 

Ripe Fuyu persimmons, which look kind of like flattened tomatoes, will be crisp, while the acorn-shaped Hachiyas will be very soft and juicy.

 

Unripe Hachiya persimmons taste very bitter and will suck all the moisture from your mouth — not very pleasant. The tartness will go away as the fruit ripens.

 

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Persimmons Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Wash Fuyu persimmons, remove core and leaves, and slice or eat whole.
  • Rinse Hachiya persimmons and slice in half. Remove seeds and spoon fruit out of skin.
  • Add firm Fuyu persimmon slices to salads.
  • Puree Hachiya persimmon flesh and add it to drinks, smoothies, or fresh fruit sauces. You can also use the puree to make cookies.
  • Slice Fuyu and spread with lime juice, salt, and chili powder. Eat with a slice of low fat cheese.
  • Mix cubed Fuyu with grapes, pomegranate seeds, cubed apple, and sliced kiwi for a colorful fall salad.
  • Top hot or cold cereal with cubed pieces of bright orange Fuyu.
  • Make salsa with a twist ― add chopped Fuyu, onion, tomatillo, cilantro, and chili Serrano and mix together.
  • Start your morning off right! Add chopped or blended Fuyu persimmons to your pancakes, waffles, and French toast.
  • Have an instant persimmon sherbet! Simply cut off a piece of the pointed tip of the fruit, tightly wrap the fruit, and freeze for up to three months. Defrost the fruit in the refrigerator for about four hours, scoop the fruit, and enjoy!

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Mixed Persimmon Salad

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories : Salads

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 cups lettuce -- use a packaged salad mix

4 Tbsp vinaigrette -- made with red wine vinegar

1/2 avocado -- peeled and slice

4 persimmons -- peeled asnd chunked

1 cup jicama -- chopped

1 Asian pear -- sliced

Put lettuce in serving bowl. Measure the dressing into a glass measure

large enough to hold the fruit. Put avocado, persimmons, jicama, and Asian

pear pieces in a glass measure as they are cut. Stir to coat. Pour the

fruit and dressing onto the lettuce. Toss to coat. Chill 20 minutes.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 172 Calories; 12g Fat (58.7%

calories from fat); 1g Protein; 17g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 7mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Vegetable; 1

Fruit; 2 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : 4 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Persimmon and Apple Salad

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories : Salads

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 Tbsp walnuts -- toasted, chopped in pieces

2 Tbsp orange juice

1 Tbsp sherry vinegar

1 Tbsp olive oil

3 apples -- rinsed, cored, and thinly sliced lengthwise

3 persimmons -- rinsed, stemmed, and thinly sliced lengthwise

In a bowl, combine orange juice, vinegar, and olive oil. Add apples,

persimmons, and toasted walnuts and mix to coat.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 87 Calories; 3g Fat (31.5% calories

from fat); 1g Protein; 16g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; trace Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1

Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Persimmon Sorbet

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories : Desserts

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

4 cups persimmon -- puree

1/2 cup granulated sugar

1/2 cup water

Separate the persimmon pulp from the fibrous threads by pressing through

a sieve with the back of a spoon. Heat the water and sugar in a medium

sauce pan until the sugar is dissolved. Blend the persimmon puree with the

sugar water mixture. Place the mixture in a freezer safe container and

freeze until firm, stirring once or twice.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 172 Calories; trace Fat (1.9%

calories from fat); 1g Protein; 45g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 2mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Fruit; 1 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 3 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Poached Persimmons

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories : Desserts

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

6 persimmons -- (about 11/2 pounds)

1/2 cup dry white wine

3/4 cup orange juice

1/4 cup sugar

1 tsp ginger root -- peeled and minced

1/4 tsp cinnamon

 

Stem and peel the persimmons, discard any seeds, and cut each persimmon

into 8 wedges. In a saucepan combine the persimmons, wine, orange juice,

sugar, gingerroot, and cinnamon, bring the liquid to a boil, stirring

occasionally, and simmer the mixture, covered, for 15 minutes, or until

the persimmons are tender. Transfer the persimmons with a slotted spoon to

a bowl, boil the syrup until it is reduced to about ½ cup, and pour it

over the persimmons. The persimmons may be served warm or chilled over ice

cream, rice pudding, or bread pudding.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 92 Calories; trace Fat (1.8%

calories from fat); trace Protein; 20g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 2mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Vegetable; 1

Fruit; 0 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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NOVEMBER: PLAINTAINS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

plantains_h.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This popular banana in Latin American, Caribbean, and Asian countries is often referred to as a cooking banana. Plantains resemble bananas but they are longer in length, thicker skinned, and starchier in flavor. In most countries, plantains are used more like a vegetable than a fruit. They are not suitable for eating raw unless very ripe, when they turn completely black. One half of a large plantain is low in sodium, high in potassium and vitamin A, and a good source of fiber. This versatile fruit has three unique stages when they can be eaten.

 

Green plantains taste more like a potato with a starchy texture. At this stage, the interior is yellowish or slightly pink. The fruit is firm and is often used as side dishes.

 

Yellow plantains are the middle stage of the fruit. These plantains can have some brownish-black spots. Their role now is both vegetable and fruit and is used in dishes that request for a slightly sweet taste and firm texture.

 

Black plantains are typically found in sweeter recipes. These plantains are all black or spotty black and are soft. Black plantains can be eaten out of hand.

Plantains

Serving size 148g

Amounts Per Serving% Daily Value

Calories 180 Calories from

Fat 1 Total Fat

0g0%Sodium

0mg0%Total Carbohydrate

47g16% Dietary Fiber

3g12% Sugars

8g Protein

2g Vitamin A

35%Vitamin C

45%Calcium

0%Iron4%*

Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

Availability, Selection, Storage, and Preparation

 

Plantains are available year round. You can buy plantains at any stage (green, yellow, or black) depending on your use and when you want to enjoy them.

 

Plantains need to be stored at room temperature. After desired stage of ripeness is reached its okay to refrigerate 2 to 3 days before cooking to slow down the ripen process. As with other bananas, plantains freeze well.

 

Plantains can be difficult to peel depending on their stage of ripeness. Black plantains are peeled like other bananas. It’s best to use cut the top and bottom of the banana first. Then using the tip of the knife, run the knife along the skin from the top to the bottom of the banana. Repeat this step on all four ridges. Next, carefully peel the skin away from the pulp. The greener the plantain, the thicker the skin; it’s best to peel green plantains under water to minimize bruising.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Plantains Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Plantains make a great addition to soups and stews.
  • Green plantains are best used like potatoes ― baked or boiled then mashed.
  • Also bake ripe plantains to serve with roasted meats.
  • Add ripe black plantains in baked desserts like bread.
  • 0Grill yellow plantains! Peel them first and then place on the grill, basting with your favorite marinade.

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Mexican Vegetable Sauté

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 Tbsp vegetable oil

1/2 cup onions -- chopped

2 cloves garlic -- peeled, halved and thinly sliced

2 jalapeno chile peppers -- seeded and cut into thin strips

5 1/2 cups plantains -- peeled and diced, cooked til tender

5 1/2 cups zucchini -- diced

1/2 cup corn -- whole kernel

1 Tbsp cilantro -- chopped

 

Heat oil in a large skillet; sauté onion, elephant garlic and chilies over

medium-low heat for 3 to 5 minutes, or till garlic is tender (do not allow

vegetables to burn). Add potatoes and squash; sauté 5-10 minutes more or

till squash is tender. Add corn and cilantro; season to taste. Cook until

warmed through.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 241 Calories; 5g Fat (18.2%

calories from fat); 4g Protein; 51g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 12mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1

Vegetable; 3 Fruit; 1 Fat.

NOTES : 4 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Sautéed Plantains & Sweet Potatoes

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 Tbsp butter

2 Tbsp olive oil

2 cups sweet potatoes -- sliced and cooked

2 plantains -- peeled and chopped

1/2 cup green onion -- chopped

1 clove garlic -- minced

1/2 cup chicken broth, ff, reduced sodium

2 Tbsp fresh herbs (thyme -- dill, or chervil), chopped

 

In a large skillet, melt the first 2 Tbsp butter and oil until hot. Add

potatoes, plantains, onions, ham if desired, and garlic. Cook, stirring

frequently, about 5 minutes. Add broth; cover and simmer 10 minutes or

till plantains are tender. Add desired fresh herbs.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 196 Calories; 9g Fat (37.8%

calories from fat); 2g Protein; 31g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 10mg

Cholesterol; 49mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Vegetable; 1

1/2 Fruit; 1 1/2 Fat.

NOTES : 4 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Squash & Plantain Puree

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 plantains -- peeled and chopped

5 1/2 cups chicken broth, ff, reduced sodium

2 cups squash, crookneck -- cooked and mashed

1/4 cup half-and-half, fat free

1/4 cup sour cream, ff

2 Tbsp butter

1/4 tsp salt

1/4 tsp pepper

2 tsp fresh thyme or basil -- chopped, or 1/2 tsp dried herbs, crushed

 

In a 2-quart saucepan, place chopped plantains and chicken broth. Bring to

boiling; reduce heat and simmer 10 to 12 minutes or until plantains are

tender. Drain well. Place cooked plantains in blender container or food

processor bowl with cooked, mashed squash, light cream, sour cream, butter

or margarine, salt, pepper, and thyme or basil. Cover and process until

smooth. Transfer puree back to saucepan; stir in additional broth to make

desired consistency. Cook over medium heat until heated through.

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 128 Calories; 4g Fat (27.7%

calories from fat); 2g Protein; 23g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 10mg

Cholesterol; 150mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 1

1/2 Fruit; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1 Fat.

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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