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Vegetable of the Month

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Same as with the Fruit of the Month, I am going to play catch up here and start with January.

 

JANUARY TUBERS:

 

Root vegetables are a commonly neglected bunch, but have recently taken some spotlight with increased emergence of international cuisine. Each root has its own unique taste and nutritional value, so be daring and expand your taste buds! This month’s feature includes: Cassava (yucca root), Jicama, Sunchoke, Taro root, and Water chestnut.

 

Varieties

 

 

 

Yucca RootServing Size (52g) Amounts Per Serving

% Daily Value

 

 

Calories 80 Calories from Fat 0 Total Fat 0g0%Sodium 5mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 20g7% Dietary Fiber 1g4% Sugars 1gProtein 2gVitamin A0%Vitamin C20%Calcium0%Iron0%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

 

Yucca Root

 

Yucca (also known as manioc or cassava), is a white, starchy tropical vegetable that widely grown and consumed in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. In many countries, yucca is a dietary staple usually eaten boiled, steamed, and in flour form as thickeners or additional ingredients for noodles, cakes, and pastries.

 

tubers_yucca.jpg

 

Yucca root has made a home growing in Florida since the late 1800s. Cassava is a bushy perennial that can grow as tall as 8 feet. The white interior of yucca is firmer than potatoes and has high starch content. Fresh yucca has thick, dark brown skin that resembles a tree's bark. Fresh yucca is available year round. Look for firm blemish free tubers. Store whole yucca as you would potatoes, in a cool, dark, dry place for up to one week. Peeled yucca covered with water and refrigerated or wrapped tightly and frozen for several months.

 

Yucca can easily be substituted for potatoes in soups and stews and it contains a high amount of vitamin C and carbohydrates. It is also a good source of dietary fiber and contains approximately 120 calories per 1 cup serving.

 

JicamaServing Size (60g) Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 25 Calories from Fat 0 Total Fat 0g0%Sodium 0mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 5g2% Dietary Fiber 3g12% Sugars1gProtein 0gVitamin A0%Vitamin C20%Calcium0%Iron2%*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

Jicama

 

Jicama is a relative of the potato family. It is a popular dietary staple in Latin America and widely grown in Mexico and Central America. There are many names for Jicama including: the Mexican potato, Mexican yam bean, ahipa, saa got, Chinese turnip, lo bok, and the Chinese potato.

 

tubers_jicama.jpg

 

Jicama looks similar to a turnip or a large radish, and it can be used as an alternative to the water chestnut. Its skin is thin and can be gray, tan, or brown in color. Additionally, it has a short root and contains white flesh. The skin is typically peeled before eating it raw. Raw jicama tastes similar to a pear or apple. It also does not discolor when exposed to the open air for awhile. Because of this, raw jicama is often used as an accompaniment to raw vegetable platters. When jicama is used in cooking it tends to take on the flavors of the ingredients that it is being combined with. Therefore, jicama is a nice complement to various stir-fry dishes because it blends well with many vegetables and seasonings.

 

Jicama is a very versatile vegetable that contains a high amount of vitamin C, is low in sodium, and has no fat. One adult serving of jicama, which is equal to approximately 1 cup of cubed jicama or 120 grams, also contains only 45 calories.

 

Jicama is available year-round. When purchasing jicama, select tubers that are firm and have dry roots. Make sure that the jicama has an unblemished skin and that is not bruised. Once purchased, store jicama for up to two weeks in a plastic bag in your refrigerator.

 

SunchokeServing Size 1 cup raw slices Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 110 Calories from Fat 0 Total Fat 0g0%Sodium 5mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 26g9% Dietary Fiber 2g10% Sugars 4gProtein 3gVitamin A0%Vitamin C10%Calcium2%Iron25%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

Sunchoke

 

A relative of the sunflower, this vegetable is native to America, not Jerusalem, and has no botanical relation to artichokes. In fact, these tubers are actually a member of the Sunflower family. The white flesh is nutty, sweet and crunchy like chestnuts when raw. Baked in their skins, they become more like potatoes with a mild taste of artichoke hearts.

 

tubers_sunchoke.jpg

 

The Jerusalem artichoke is widely grown in gardens in Texas and is harvested in the fall for highest quality. Widely available in supermarkets, its peak period is September through January, but often continues through the early spring.

 

Select firm sunchokes that are firm and free from mold and wrinkles. Sunchokes vary in color where their shades range from dark brown to light brown in color, similar to ginger.

 

These tubers need be refrigerated, unwashed, in a plastic bag for up to 1 week for successful storage.

 

Taro RootServing Size 1 cup raw slices (104g) Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 110 Calories from Fat 0 Total Fat 0g0%Sodium 10mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 28g9% Dietary Fiber 4g17% Sugars 1gProtein 2gVitamin A0%Vitamin C8%Calcium4%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

Taro Root

 

The taro root, as with other tubers is recognized by other names. This tuber is also known as dasheen, eddo and kalo in many areas of the world including West Africa, Asia, Central America, South America and the Caribbean and Polynesian islands. This root is most well-known as the ingredient of the Hawaiian dish "poi," or mashed taro root.

 

tubers_taro.jpg

 

Taro root is a starchy vegetable that is commonly used in place of a potato. Its hairy outer coating on its surface is similar to a coconut. The hairy outer layer is always removed with caution since skin irritation can arise caused by the juices secreted by the taro root. It is recommended to use protective rubber gloves when handling this tuber. Taro root is toxic in its raw form so always cook it before eating.

 

These tubers take on a nut-like flavor when cooked. Frying, baking, roasting, boiling, or steaming them as an accompaniment to meat dishes are all common uses. Soups and stews are other dishes that taro root suits well. Taro roots provide a good source of fiber and supply approximately 110 calories per adult serving.

 

Select tubers that are firm, hairy, with no wrinkling. Store the roots for up to one week in a cool and dry location, making sure that the roots do not dry out.

 

 

 

Water ChestnutServing Size (62g) Amounts Per Serving

% Daily Value

 

 

Calories 30 Calories from Fat 0 Total Fat 0g0%Sodium 5mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 8g3% Dietary Fiber 3g12% Sugars 1gProtein 1gVitamin A0%Vitamin C0%Calcium0%Iron90%*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

 

Water Chestnut

 

The water chestnut, resembles a chestnut in color and shape, is also known as the Chinese water caltrop. This tuber is commonly associated with Chinese cooking, but is finding its way into other ethnic meals.

 

Hailing from Southeast Asia, water chestnuts are actually roots of an aquatic plant that grows in freshwater ponds, marshes, lakes, and in slow-moving rivers and streams. These roots are commonly grown in Japan, Taiwan, China, Thailand, and sometimes in Australia. Water chestnut harvesting is laborious, making them somewhat expensive to purchase. Processed and canned water chestnuts widely found in most supermarkets. However, fresh water chestnuts, are more difficult to find, but are becoming more available.

 

tubers_ches1.jpg

 

If you find fresh water chestnuts, select those that are firm with no signs of wrinkling. These will need to be peeled prior to eating and cooking. Stored fresh tubers need to be wrapped tightly in a plastic bag for up to one week.

 

Canned, unopened water chestnuts will store indefinitely. Once opened, canned tubers will keep up to one week in a bowl of water. Be sure to change the water daily for the ‘freshest’ product.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Tubers Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Add yucca with potatoes and other vegetables into beef, chicken, or vegetable-based soups and stews.
  • Try eating jicama raw by including it into slaws or salads.
  • Use jicama as a substitute for water chestnuts in all of your favorite recipes.
  • Sunchokes make a delicious substitute in recipes that ask for water chestnuts or jicama.
  • Add sliced sunchokes in marinated vegetable mixtures, or on an appetizer vegetable platter with dips.
  • Add water chestnuts to your stir-fries, salads, or any meals where you need a crunchy consistency.

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Chinese Chicken with Water Chestnuts

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 Tbsp dry sherry -- or chicken stock

3 Tbsp soy sauce, low sodium

1 tsp cornstarch

2 Tablespoons sesame oil

1 clove garlic -- crushed

3 Tbsp chives -- chopped

1 Tbsp ginger root -- slivered

1/2 lb chicken breast -- cut in thin strips

2 cups waterchestnuts -- peeled and sliced (canned is okay)

1 cup bamboo shoots -- sliced

 

Mix sherry, soy sauce and cornstarch; set aside. Heat frying pan; add oil

and heat thoroughly. Add garlic, chives, ginger, and bamboo shoots;

stir-fry 1 minute. Add chicken to stir-fry and cook for 3 to 4 minutes or

until light brown. Add water chestnuts and stir-fry 1 more minute. Add

cornstarch mixture and stir for another minute or so. Serve immediately.

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 232 Calories; 11g Fat (43.4%

calories from fat); 12g Protein; 21g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 29mg

Cholesterol; 490mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 1 1/2 Lean Meat; 1

Vegetable; 1 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 5 points per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Jicama and Carrot Slaw

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 pound jicama -- 1 small (480 g), peeled and julienned

3/4 cup carrots -- cleaned and grated

1/4 cup scallion -- white part only, minced

3 tablespoons sour cream, light -- (45 ml)

3 tablespoons mayonnaise, imitation -- (45 ml) or light

2 tablespoons vinegar -- (30 ml), malt

1 clove garlic -- minced

1 1/2 cups lettuce leaf -- washed and crisped

 

1.Place the jicama, carrot, and scallion in a bowl.

 

2.In a small bowl, whisk together the sour cream, mayonnaise, vinegar, and

garlic. Spoon onto the vegetables and toss.

 

3.To serve, place 2 lettuce pieces on each of 4 plates. Divide the

vegetable mixture between the plates and serve.

 

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 71 Calories; 1g Fat (11.5% calories

from fat); 2g Protein; 15g Carbohydrate; 6g Dietary Fiber; 6mg

Cholesterol; 75mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1/2

Vegetable; 0 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : This recipe is one point per serving.

 

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Jicama, Orange and Onion Salad

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 cups lettuce leaves -- torn

1 cup oranges -- peeled and thinly sliced, about 2 naval variety

2 cups onions -- thinly sliced, red variety

1 cup jicama -- peeled and julienne-sliced

Dressing:

1/3 cup orange juice

1/2 tsp olive oil

1 Tbsp cilantro -- finely chopped, fresh

1/4 tsp chili powder

 

In a large salad bowl, place torn lettuce. Cut orange slices into

quarters; toss into lettuce with onion and jicama. For dressing, shake

together all ingredients in a shaker jar; toss with salad.

 

 

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 82 Calories; 1g Fat (9.1% calories

from fat); 2g Protein; 18g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 9mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1 1/2

Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 0 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is one point per serving.

 

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Stir Fry with Brown Rice and Water Chestnuts

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

16 ounces scallops

1 cup broccoli florets

1 cup oyster mushrooms -- whole

1 cup celery -- chopped

1/2 cup waterchestnuts -- sliced

1 Tbsp sesame oil

1 Tbsp vegetable oil

2 cloves garlic

1/2 cup chicken stock

1/2 tsp light soy sauce

1/2 Tbsp ginger -- fresh chopped

1 tsp cayenne pepper

2 cups cooked brown rice

 

In a large, hot sauté pan add both oils and let heat for ½ minute.

Continue adding: scallops or chicken, garlic, ginger, broccoli and celery.

Sauté until ½ done, about 2-3 minutes. Add mushrooms, water chestnuts, soy

sauce, and hot pepper. Let reduce to about ½ liquid volume. Serve

immediately with rice.

 

 

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 312 Calories; 9g Fat (25.5%

calories from fat); 23g Protein; 34g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 37mg

Cholesterol; 517mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 3 Lean Meat; 1/2

Vegetable; 1 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 6 points per serving.

 

 

 


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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:lol:

 

I was going ask you if it would be okay if I did something like this but biweekly- I was going to start with leeks! :lol:

 

BEAT ME TO IT!!!


Jeannette

 

"I have searched for the phrase "I shall walk the Earth and my hunger will know no bounds", but I keep getting redirected to Weight Watchers." Ianto Jones, Torchwood

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Hey, you figure out another thing to do and get it posted! Sorry that I got in front of you! I have been wanting to do this since the first of the year and am only just now getting to it.

 

Seriously Jeanette, I would love it if you picked a subject and just ran with it!


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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FEBRUARY EXOTIC VEGETABLES:

 

EXOTIC VEGETABLES!

 

exotic_calabaza_h.jpg

These three exotic vegetables: calabaza squash, chayote squash, and bitter melon are all becoming more mainstream. All three are being found more and more in local supermarkets; there may soon be no need to go to a specialty market to try something new.

 

Calabaza Squash

 

Word to the WiseWhole calabaza may be difficult to slice. Slicing through the tough rind often calls for a heavy cleaver or a very sharp knife. If the squash resists slicing, remove the stem and place the knife or cleaver blade along the squash’s length. Gently tap the blade with a hammer until the squash falls open. Scoop out the seeds, peel and prepare!

Calabaza is a type of pumpkin-like squash that is round in shape and varies in size. It can be as large as a watermelon or as small as a cantaloupe. The color of calabaza can also vary and may include greens, tans, reds and oranges. Some squash are all one color while other calabaza are multi-colored and may include all of colors listed above. This squash is popular in the Caribbean as well as Central and South America. It is also commonly called a West Indian Pumpkin.

 

Selection

Calabaza is often sold already chopped into chunks in many Latin markets. This is because of the difficulty many have in chopping the whole squash (see box below). Select pieces with a fresh, moist and unblemished flesh. Soft or wet spots means the squash is beginning to spoil. The color of the flesh should be a bright orange. Whole squash are more difficult to find, but if you find one, select one that still has the stem attached and is heavy for its size. You should avoid purchasing a squash with bruises, cuts, or soft spots. Calabaza is available year round.

 

Storage

Whole calabaza may be stored in a cool, dry space for up to 6 weeks. Cut calabaza should be wrapped tightly or placed in a covered container in the refrigerated for no more than one week.

 

exotic_calabaza_v.jpgPreparation

Calabaza has a sweet flavor and its texture is firm. This is similar to the taste and texture of more familiar varieties of squash, such as butternut or acorn. Calabaza may be substituted in recipes calling for those more common types of squash.

 

Calabaza is most commonly baked, either cut in sections or in cubes. Its seeds may also be roasted in a similar way as pumpkin seeds. Simply place on a baking sheet coated in cooking spray until brown and crisp.

 

Chayote Squash

 

Chayote is a gourd-like squash that is about the size and shape of a very large pear. The skin is pale green and smooth with slight ridges that run lengthwise. Many compare the color to a light green apple. The flesh is white and there is one soft seed in the middle. Chayote is grown in several states including California, Florida, and Louisiana, but it is native to Latin America. Historically, this squash was one of the primary foods of the Aztecs and Mayas. Chayote is also called mirliton and the French call it christophene.

 

exotic_chayote_v.jpgSelection

Select squash that are small, firm and unblemished; just as you would select a pear. Choose squash that is heavy for its size. Tender skin, skin that reacts to pressure, often means poor quality. Chayote is commonly found in supermarkets during peak season (December to March), but may be found in larger supermarkets and specialty markets throughout the year.

 

Storage

Refrigerate whole chayote in a plastic bag for up to one month. Cut chayote may be refrigerated in a covered container or tightly wrapped for 3 to 5 days. It is best to use chopped chayote immediately, as it can gather flavors from other foods stored in the refrigerator.

 

Preparation

Chayote has a bland-tasting flesh that may be used in several ways. It may be prepared in similar ways to other summer squash, such as zucchini, but may require peeling and a bit more seasoning. Chayote is most commonly used in side dishes, stews, and casseroles. It may also be sliced in half and baked. The soft seed is edible, but many choose to remove it.

 

Bitter Melon

 

Bitter melon is actually a member of the squash family and resembles a cucumber with bumpy skin. When first picked, a bitter melon is yellow-green, but as it ripens, it turns to a yellow-orange color. The inside of the melon is filled with fibrous seeds. Bitter melon is used mostly in Asian and Indian cooking. Other names for bitter melon include: foo qua, balsam pear, or bitter gourd.

 

exotic_bitter_v.jpgSelection

Select firm, unblemished melons that are from 5 to 12 inches in length. Choose melons that are still green for a more bitter flavor and a yellow-orange melon for a milder taste. Bitter melons are available fresh from April to September in most Asian markets and can occasionally be found in larger supermarkets. Some markets are beginning to carry bitter melons year round. They may also be purchased canned or dried.

 

Storage

Store melon loose in a paper or plastic bag in the refrigerator for 3 to 5 days. Slice the melon immediately before use.

 

Preparation

Cut in half and discard the seeds and fibrous core. To reduce the bitterness, blanch in boiling water for 2 to 3 minutes. The skin is edible and the melon is not typically peeled. The seeds are also edible, unless very hard, and are included in some recipes. Bitter melon is commonly stuffed, curried or pickled. It can also be used in stir-fry’s and soups and may be steamed. Garlic or chili peppers are often added to recipes with bitter melon to offset the bitter taste.

 

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Exotic Vegetables Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Add cooked chayote to your green salad for a different flavor.
  • Add calabaza to your vegetable soup for color and texture.
  • Add bitter melon to your next stir-fry.
  • Cook chayote with carrots for a blend of flavors.
  • Calabaza makes a great addition to winter stew.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Caribbean Calabaza and Chayote Ratatouille

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 cup squash -- calabaza ,cubed

2 chayote squash -- diced

2 peppers -- Anaheim, diced

1/2 cup red bell pepper -- diced

2 cloves garlic -- diced

1 medium plantain -- green, sliced

1 cup onion -- chopped

2 Tbsp olive oil

1 tsp salt

1 cup orange juice

1 tsp cumin seed

1 tsp oregano -- ground

1 tsp black pepper

 

Warm the olive oil in a large dutch oven. Add the onion and cook until

translucent. Then add each of the vegetables at 2 minute intervals

starting with the green plantains, calabaza, chayote, Anaheim chile and

red pepper. Stir well without crushing any of the vegetables. Season with

garlic, oregano, cumin, black pepper and salt. Moisten the mixture with

the orange juice. Simmer for 5 minutes or until tender.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 140 Calories; 6g Fat (32.5%

calories from fat); 2g Protein; 24g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 360mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1 1/2

Vegetable; 1 Fruit; 1 Fat.

 

NOTES : 2 points per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Chayote and Poblano Slaw

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1/2 cup pineapple juice

1 large cucumber -- halved lengthwise

1 large chayote squash -- peel, pitted and halved lengthwise

2 cups pineapple -- diced

4 peppers -- Poblano, roasted and peeled

1 Tbsp Dijon mustard

1 Tbsp olive oil

 

In a small saucepan, simmer pineapple juice over low heat, until reduced

to 2 tablespoons. Let cool to room temperature. Sauté chayote just until

crisp, about 1 to 2 minutes. Thinly slice cucumber and the chile. Toss

with pineapple. Whisk the remaining ingredients with the pineapple juice,

and pour over vegetables, mix well. Serve immediately or refrigerate,

covered up to 4 hours.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 70 Calories; 2g Fat (27.0% calories

from fat); 1g Protein; 13g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 26mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Lean Meat; 1 Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit;

1/2 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 1 point per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Chayote Salad

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 1/2 cups chayote squash

3 cups spinach leaves

16 oz garbanzo beans -- cooked

1/2 cup red onion -- chopped

1/2 cup carrot -- chopped

2 Tbsp vinaigrette

2 ounces mozzarella cheese, part skim milk -- shredded

 

Cook chayote in a small amount of boiling water for about l5 minutes, or

till tender. Rinse pieces in cold water; peel, and remove seed. Cut into

½-inch chunks. In a large salad bowl, toss together spinach, chayote,

garbanzo beans, and cheese. Top with nonfat vinaigrette

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 259 Calories; 7g Fat (23.2%

calories from fat); 14g Protein; 38g Carbohydrate; 11g Dietary Fiber; 4mg

Cholesterol; 63mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean Meat;

1/2 Vegetable; 1 Fat.

 

NOTES : 5 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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Hey, you figure out another thing to do and get it posted! Sorry that I got in front of you! I have been wanting to do this since the first of the year and am only just now getting to it.

 

Seriously Jeanette, I would love it if you picked a subject and just ran with it!

 

:lol: Oh sure, take all the *good* topics! :D

 

I didn't mention it to you in time 'cause I got sidetracked with that twin sale stuff and William's taking up more of my time than the other two did (weaning's not going smoothly).

 

You're doing a *much* better job than I could, and your posts look *fabulous*!!!

 

When my situtation settles down a bit more, I'll find some outlet for my creative juices. :)


Jeannette

 

"I have searched for the phrase "I shall walk the Earth and my hunger will know no bounds", but I keep getting redirected to Weight Watchers." Ianto Jones, Torchwood

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Barbara,

This looks wonderful with the pictures. I love it.

Jean


Jean - 330/215/150

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MARCH LEEKS AND GREEN ONIONS

 

 

 

 

 

LEEKS & GREEN ONIONS!

 

leeks_h.jpg

 

This is also available as a

print-friendly Adobe Acrobat document* (PDF - 285K)

This month’s vegetable of the month highlights two often forgotten members of the onion family ― Leeks and Green onions (scallions). Leeks and green onions look similar they both have bulbous-like ends, fringed roots, and long leaves. These vegetables have an established food history, with usage from European to Asian cuisines, thus illustrating their versatile nature.

 

 

Leeks

 

LeeksServing Size 67g

Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 25 Total Fat 0g0%Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 10mg0%Total Carbohydrate 6g2% Dietary Fiber 1g4% Sugars 2gProtein 1gVitamin A0%Vitamin C8%Calcium2%Iron4%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

Leeks look like a giant scallion and are related to both garlic and the onion. Native to the Mediterranean region, this vegetable dates back to around 4000 BC. Although its flavor and fragrance are similar to its relatives, they are slightly sweet tasting and often served as a side dish.

 

Selection

Leeks are found in markets year round with a peak during fall to early spring.

Select leeks with clean white bottoms making sure that the ends are straight and not larger than 1 ½ inches in diameter, otherwise they will have a tough texture. The tops should be green, crisp and fresh-looking. Small to medium leeks (less than 1½ inches in diameter) are the tenderest.

 

Storage

Refrigerate leeks, unwashed, in a loosely fitting plastic bag for up to one week. Storing leeks in plastic helps them hold onto moisture and keep the odor from spreading to other foods.

 

Preparation

Leeks carry some dirt especially in between the layer of overlapping leaves. Begin cleaning by removing discolored leaves and trimming off green tops and root tips. Cut the leek lengthwise by inserting a knife from the base. Spread the leaves and rinse thoroughly. Placing the fanned out leaves in a bowl of water and gently moving the leaves will loosen any remaining dirt.

 

Leeks make excellent side dishes and appetizers but can also be added to many entrees including soups, stews, quiches, and salads.

 

This delicate vegetable cooks quickly and overcooking them will result in a slimy and soft product. In addition, they store heat well and will continue to cook even after the heat source is removed.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Leeks Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Bake, broil, braise, sauté or microwave.
  • Serve cooked leeks alone, seasoned with lemon juice, and herbs.
  • Boil, drain and place in a casserole; season with grated cheese and bread crumbs, then bake until bubbly.
  • Add to egg dishes, like quiches and frittatas.
  • Include sliced or pureed leeks to soups, stews, and stocks.
  • Add thin sliced leeks to salads.
  • Combine leeks with other vegetables like carrots, squash, and beets for a colorful side dish.

 

Green Onions/Scallions

 

Green OnionsServing Size 25g

Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 10 Total Fat 0g0%Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 2g1% Dietary Fiber 1g4% Sugars 1gProtein 0gVitamin A2%Vitamin C8%Calcium2%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

Green onions or scallions are really immature onions. Scallions are harvested while their tops are still green and before the bulb takes its full shape.

Green onions can be eaten raw or cooked and have a milder flavor than their onion relative.

 

Selection

Purchase only green crisp tops and white bottoms. In general, the more slender bottoms will have a sweeter taste.

 

Storage

Scallions wilt within a couple days, so it’s best to use them immediately. However, if you must store them, refrigerate them in a tightly closed plastic bag up to one week.

 

Preparation

Rinse the scallions thoroughly as dirt may be lodged between the leaves. Trim any wilted parts and the tip of the white root. The entire scallion can be chopped or sliced and added to any of your recipes for added flavor.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Leeks Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Trim off roots and 2 inches off tops, grill until tender and streaked with brown marks.
  • Add chopped green onions to cooked rice or other favorite grains.
  • Add sliced green onions to stir-fry dishes, salads, and dips.
  • Slice green onions into a potato or baby greens salad.

 

 

I love both leeks and green onions! They are so versatile!

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Avocado Green Onion Party Dip

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 7 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1/2 medium avocado -- seeded and peeled

1 cup cottage cheese, lowfat

3/4 cup yogurt, skim milk

1/2 cup green onions -- sliced

1/4 cup carrots -- shredded

1 Tbsp lemon juice

1/4 cup mayonnaise, imitation, no cholesterol

2 cups broccoli florets

1 cup cucumber slices

3 ounces melba toast -- rounds, 28

 

Dice avocado into small pieces, toss with lemon juice and set aside. In

food processor or blender, blend cottage cheese, yogurt and mayonnaise

until smooth. Add cottage cheese mixture to avocado, gently stirring in

onions and carrots. Cover and chill. Serve with vegetable crudités and

melba toast rounds, allowing ½ cup vegetables, 4 melba toast rounds and 8

Tbsp dip per serving.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 162 Calories; 7g Fat (37.4%

calories from fat); 8g Protein; 18g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 2mg

Cholesterol; 291mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Lean Meat;

1/2 Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 3 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Bacon, Ham and Leek Quiche

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

6 strips turkey bacon

1/2 cup ham slice, extra lean -- diced

12 leeks -- thinly sliced

3 1/2 cups Swiss cheese, lowfat

1 Tbsp flour

1 cup egg beaters® 99% egg substitute

1 cup half-and-half, fat free

1 cup milk, skim

1 pie shell -- 9 "

 

Fry bacon until crisp. Drain. Reserve 1 Tbsp of drippings. Fry leeks and

ham in bacon drippings until leeks are tender (5-10 minutes). Drain.

 

Mix Swiss cheese with flour. Set aside.

 

Beat egg substitute add cream, and milk. Add cheese and flour mixture. Mix

well. Stir in crumbled bacon, ham and leeks. Mix well. Pour mixture into a

9-inch pie shell. Bake at 375 degrees for about 45 minutes or until knife

inserted in center comes out clean.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 362 Calories; 12g Fat (30.0%

calories from fat); 25g Protein; 37g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 34mg

Cholesterol; 739mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 3 Lean Meat; 3

1/2 Vegetable; 1/2 Non-Fat Milk; 1 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : 8 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Green Onions and Lemongrass Rice

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 Tbsps Vegetable Oil

2/3 cups onion -- finely chopped

1/4 tsp Turmeric

1 cup rice -- long grain

3 1/4 cups water

2 stalks lemon grass -- 12" ea, cut in 2" pieces

1/2 tsp salt

1 cup green onions -- chopped

 

Heat 1½ Tbsps oil in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat. Add 2/3 cup

onion and turmeric and sauté 5 minutes. Mix in rice. Add water, lemongrass

and ½ tsp salt and bring to simmer. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low and

simmer until rice is tender and liquid is absorbed, about 18 minutes.

Remove from heat; let stand covered 10 minutes. Discard lemongrass.

 

Heat remaining ½ Tbsp oil in heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add

green onion and sauté 1 minute. Add rice and stir until heated through.

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 280 Calories; 7g Fat (23.4%

calories from fat); 5g Protein; 50g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 281mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable;

1 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : 6 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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:lol: LEEKS!!! I'm currently on a leek craze! I have a tip for rinsing the leeks:

when I slice them, I immediatly put them into a big strainer. When I'm done slicing them I run the strainer with the leeks under running water while swirling them around and around. The come out nice and clean *and* the cold water makes them "perk up" a bit.

 

MORE LEEKS! :D


Jeannette

 

"I have searched for the phrase "I shall walk the Earth and my hunger will know no bounds", but I keep getting redirected to Weight Watchers." Ianto Jones, Torchwood

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Guest sodacracker

So that's what some of those vegetables look like! Thank you!

 

Leeks - my new favourite soup is 1 litre of chicken broth with 2 cups of chopped leeks and 1/2 cup diced carrot. Add a dash of olive oil and simmer until soft. Delicious and 0 points.

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yum! That really sounds good! I love leeks. My fave is 'green chili'. Everything that goes into it is green except for the chicken. It is mostly leeks!


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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APRIL TOMATILLO

 

 

 

TOMATILLO!

 

tomatillo_h.jpg

 

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print-friendly Adobe Acrobat document* (PDF - 190K)

Tomatillos are small fruits (used as a vegetable) enclosed in a husk. The fruit resembles a small unripe tomato and is usually green or yellow. The yellow color indicates ripeness, but tomatillos are most often used when they are still green. Green tomatillos are firmer and easier to slice. The husk that holds the fruit is paper-like and is light brown. The flesh is slightly acidic with a hint of lemon. Tomatillos belong to the same family as tomatoes.

 

The Aztecs first grew tomatillos as far back as 800 B.C. and they have been popular in Mexico and other Latin American countries for many years. In the US, they are mainly grown in Texas.

 

TomatillosServing size 1 medium (34g)

Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 10 Calories from Fat 5 Total Fat 0g0%Saturated Fat 0g0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Sodium 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 2g1% Dietary Fiber 1g4% Sugars 0gProtein 0gVitamin A0%Vitamin C6%Calcium0%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

Selection

 

The condition of the husk is often a good indicator when selecting tomatillos. If the husk is dry or shriveled then the fruit is probably not in good condition. Select tomatillos that have an intact, tight-fitting, light brown husk. If you peel back a small part of the husk, the fruit should be firm and free of blemishes.

 

Canned tomatillos are available at specialty markets and are often used when making sauces. Tomatillos are available year round in supermarkets and specialty markets. Domestically grown tomatillos are available from May through November.

 

 

Storage

 

Fresh tomatillos with the husk still intact may be stored in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. They are best stored in a paper bag. Tomatillos last a week longer in the refrigerator if the husks are removed and the fruit is placed in sealed plastic bags. Tomatillos may also be frozen after removing the husks.

 

 

Preparation

 

tomatillo_01.jpgThe husks must be removed before preparing, but tomatillos in the husk are often used as decoration. Wash the fruit with soap and water to remove the film left by the husk. Tomatillos may be used raw in salsas or salads or cooked for sauces. Cooking enhances the flavor and softens its skin, but the result is a soupy consistency since the fruit collapses after a few minutes.

 

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Tomatillos Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Slice tomatillos into salsa to add color and flavor.
  • Add diced tomatillo to guacamole for an extra crunch.
  • Top tacos with sliced tomatillos for a change.
  • Liven up your soup with some chopped tomatillos.

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Corn & Tomatillo Soup

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

5 1/2 cup tomatillos

5 1/2 cup onion -- chopped

2 cloves garlic -- diced

1 tsp margarine

8 1/4 cup corn -- whole kernel

1 cup frozen peas

4 cups chicken broth

1 Tbsp cilantro -- chopped

4 oz green chili peppers -- diced

1/4 cup spinach -- chopped

1 tsp sugar

 

Sauté tomatillos, onion and garlic in with margarine for five minutes.

Remove to food processor and add peas and cilantro. Puree to chunky. Pour

in pan and add chicken stock, diced green chilies, chopped spinach, corn,

and sugar. Heat and serve.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 254 Calories; 4g Fat (13.5%

calories from fat); 11g Protein; 50g Carbohydrate; 9g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 438mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 3

Vegetable; 1/2 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 5 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Mahi-Mahi With Corn & Tomatillo Salsa

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

6 fish fillets -- 3 oz. each, mahi-mahi

1/3 cup pistachio nuts -- ground

Salsa:

5 ears fresh corn

24 tomatillos

1 red pepper

1 tomato

1/2 jalapeño -- seeded

2 Tbsp cilantro

Sauce:

1 cup orange juice -- fresh squeezed

1 tsp lemon juice

2 Tbsp oil -- pistachio nut

 

Salsa, Prepare a hot grill. Remove silks from ears of corn and pull husks

back to cover. Place on grill and char on all sides until corn is cooked,

about 5 minutes. At the same time, remove the husks from tomatillos and

place on grill with red pepper and char on all sides. When vegetables are

cool enough to handle remove the husks from the corn and cut off the cob.

Finely dice the tomatillos and tomato. Peel, seed and dice the red pepper.

Place them all in a stainless steel bowl and mix with the jalapeño and

cilantro and season with salt and pepper. Reserve.

 

Sauce, Place orange juice in a stainless steel saucepan and reduce by half

over high heat until lightly thickened. Add the lemon juice and pistachio

nut oil and reserve.

 

To serve, Heat a non-stick skillet over high heat. Roll fish filets in

ground pistachios. Spray oil on skillet and cook filets on both sides to

lightly brown and cook through. Divide salsa between six plates, place

fish on top and drizzle sauce around the fish.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 410 Calories; 12g Fat (25.8%

calories from fat); 47g Protein; 31g Carbohydrate; 6g Dietary Fiber; 99mg

Cholesterol; 142mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 5 1/2 Lean Meat; 2

Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 1 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : 8 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Mango and Tomatillo Salsa

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 mangos -- peeled and diced

10 tomatillos -- husked and sliced

1 jalapeno pepper -- seeded and sliced

1/4 cup lime juice

1/4 cup onion -- diced

1/4 cup cilantro -- chopped

1/2 cup tomatoes -- diced

 

Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl. Cover and let sit for at

least 2 hours before serving.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 57 Calories; 1g Fat (9.3% calories

from fat); 1g Protein; 13g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 5mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1/2

Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 0 Fat.

 

NOTES : 1 point per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Roast Chicken With Tomatillo Sauce

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1/2 pound tomatillos -- husks removed and quartered

4 cloves garlic -- minced

2 ounces green chili peppers

1/2 bunch fresh cilantro -- chopped

1 small onion -- chopped

1/2 tsp black pepper

12 ounces chicken breast, no skin, no bone, R-T-C -- halved, skin and fat removed

1 red bell pepper -- sliced into rings

 

Puree the first six ingredients. Place in a 9 inch quiche pan or pie

plate, cover with microwave plastic wrap, and microwave on high for 5

minutes. To cook on top of stove, place pureed ingredients in a saucepan

and simmer 20 minutes.

 

Spoon the sauce over the chicken, cover, and bake in a preheated 350

degree oven for 35 to 40 minutes.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 146 Calories; 3g Fat (17.8%

calories from fat); 20g Protein; 10g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 52mg

Cholesterol; 48mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 2 1/2 Lean Meat; 1

1/2 Vegetable; 0 Fat.

 

NOTES : 3 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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MAY: SPROUTS

 

 

 

SPROUTS!

 

sprouts_h.jpg

 

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print-friendly Adobe Acrobat document* (PDF - 207k)

Sprouts are commonly seen at salad bars and supermarkets and each kind has its own unique flavor. Sprouts have a long history and were used for medicinal purposes in ancient China.

 

So what exactly classifies as a sprout? By definition it is a vegetable seed that just begins growing. Sprouts grow from the seeds of vegetables, grains, and various beans. They are the first edible shoots.

 

Sprouts (Alfalfa Sprouts)Serving Size (50g) Amount Per Serving Calories 15

Calories from Fat 0

 

 

% Daily Value*Total Fat 0g0%Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 0mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 2g1%

Dietary Fiber 1g

 

 

 

 

 

 

4%

Sugars 0g

 

 

 

 

Protein 2gVitamin A2%Calcium2%Vitamin C8%Iron30%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

 

Varieties

 

Sprouts like other vegetables can vary in texture and taste. There are some that can add some spice to your meals like radish and onion sprouts. Hardy sprouts, like Mung bean sprouts, can withstand cooking. More delicate ones, like alfalfa sprouts, can be used in salads and sandwiches.

 

While not varieties of sprouts are available at your local supermarket, try going to a farmer’s market to find other varieties.

 

sprouts_03.jpg

 

Bean Sprouts

Commonly associated with the Mung beans, these sprouts have small light yellow leaves and a silvery white shoot. These sprouts produce a subtle nutty flavor and lots of crunch when added to stir-fries, soups, and salads.

 

sprouts_01.jpg

 

Green-Leaf Sprouts

Typically germinated vegetable and grain seeds, these sprouts and are recognized by two tiny green leaves at the tip of a slender 1/2-inch to 3-inch shoot. These sprouts are often used in salads and sandwiches.

 

sprouts_02.jpg

 

Alfalfa Sprouts

One of the most common sprouts on the market, these sprouts have threadlike shoots with green tops. They provide a subtle nutty flavor. A great addition to salads and sandwiches.

 

Radish Sprouts

Known as the "hot," these sprouts that evokes the zippy taste of radishes.

 

Sunflower Sprouts

Similar to alfalfa sprouts, sunflower sprouts have a mild, sweet flavor, adding crunch to any dish.

 

Pumpkin Sprouts

Grown from hulled seeds, these sprouts can be eaten raw or lightly toasted. Excellent when added to salads, soups and bread.

 

Wheat Sprouts

These sprouts cook quickly and are often used in recipes in place of whole grains.

 

Lentil Sprouts

Although not as ‘spicy’ as the Radish sprout, lentil sprouts have a peppery flavor. They are often used in soups, stews and casseroles.

 

Selection

 

Sprouts are fresh when they are crisp and their roots are moist and white. Avoid musty-smelling, dark, or slimy-looking sprouts.

 

Storage

 

Sprouts are highly perishable and should be eaten as soon as possible, but there are some ways to extend their shelf life. Most sprouts can be kept in a plastic bag in the crisper of the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Delicate sprouts like alfalfa should be refrigerated in the original ventilated plastic container. Rinsing daily under cold water may extend their life. Lastly, Mung bean sprouts can then be frozen if they are to be used for future cooking.

 

 

Sprouts and Food Safety

 

sprouts_04.jpgBecause sprouts have associated with outbreaks of Salmonella and E.coli O157:H7 infection, people at high risk from exposure to these bacteria, such as children, the elderly, and people with weak immune systems, should avoid eating sprouts.

 

Sprouts are still an excellent way to increase your vegetable intake. Just take some precautions when choosing, storing, and preparing your sprouts:

  • Buy only fresh looking sprouts from a reputable store.
  • Keep sprouts refrigerated and use them promptly.
  • Wash the sprouts thoroughly with water to remove any dirt.

For more information on sprouts and food safety please visit:

*Links to non-Federal organizations are provided solely as a service to our users. Links do not constitute an endorsement of any organization by CDC or the Federal Government, and none should be inferred. The CDC is not responsible for the content of the individual organization Web pages found at this link.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Sprouts Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Hardier sprouts like Mung bean and lentil sprouts tolerate heat and are often used in stir-fry dishes, soups, and stews.
  • Fresh sprouts make a great addition to salads, sandwiches, and wraps, and can also be used as a garnish.
  • Add a variety of different sprouts to your favorite coleslaw.
  • Try Mung bean or lentil sprouts in your potato salad for a different texture.
  • Include cabbage, Mung bean, or lentil sprouts in all your vegetable and fruit smoothies or blended juices for a tasty treat.
  • Sprouts like Mung bean and radish can be mixed with soft cheeses for a delicious dip.
  • Looking for a new sandwich spreads? Try pureeing lentil or radish sprouts with a teaspoon of fat free cream cheese.
  • Liven up your omelet or scrambled eggs with alfalfa, clover, or radish sprouts.
  • Many rice dishes taste great with a combination of fenugreek, lentil, or Mung bean sprouts.
  • Serve sprouts as side dishes! Try sautéing your favorite sprouts with onions, adding sprouts to baked beans, or pureeing sprouts with your favorite peas or beans.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Eat-it-all Beach Salad

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 1 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 green pepper

1/4 cup sprouts

1 small tomato

2 Tbsp yogurt, skim milk -- lemon flavored

1 tsp wheat germ

1/4 cup cucumber -- diced

1/4 cup yellow squash -- diced

 

Slice top off pepper and save top. Clean out membrane and seeds from

inside. Combine sprouts, tomato, cucumber and summer squash. Mix wheat

germ with yogurt and toss with salad mixture. Pack into green pepper.

Replace top and chill.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 96 Calories; 1g Fat (9.0% calories

from fat); 5g Protein; 19g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 1mg

Cholesterol; 39mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 3 Vegetable; 0

Non-Fat Milk.

 

NOTES : 1 point per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Sprout Curry

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 tsp olive oil

1 large onion -- finely chopped

1 Tbsp thyme -- fresh

1 Tbsp basil -- fresh

1 Tbsp curry powder

2 Tbsp water

4 cups sprouts -- Adzuki,Mung bean, lentil, pea, lima bean, gand arbanzo bean, plus a tiny bit of radish sprouts for zip (assorted kinds)

 

Heat oil in a deep pot and sauté onion with seasonings. Add 2 Tbsp of

water and stir in sprouts. Turn heat up to high and cook for 5 minutes.

Serve alongside grilled chicken and rice or add to your favorite sandwich.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 27 Calories; 1g Fat (32.7% calories

from fat); 1g Protein; 4g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol;

3mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 0 Fat.

 

NOTES : 0 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Sprout Omelet

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 2 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 cup sprouts -- mung bean

1/2 cup bell pepper -- diced

1/4 cup green onion -- diced

2/3 cup mushrooms -- sliced

1/4 cup waterchestnuts -- diced

1 cup egg beaters® 99% egg substitute

1/4 cup milk, skim

2 tsp oil -- vegetable

 

In an omelet pan, sauté vegetables and bean sprouts in oil for 3-5

minutes. Remove vegetables and place on a warm plate. Whip together the

egg substitute milk Pour egg mixture into the omelet pan and cook on both

sides. Place vegetables in center and fold omelet over.

 

If using alfalfa sprouts, sauté the vegetable 1 to 3 minutes before adding

the alfalfa sprouts so that they cook for only 2 minutes. Cooking alfalfa

sprouts changes their taste in an interesting way.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 142 Calories; 5g Fat (30.6%

calories from fat); 12g Protein; 12g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 1mg

Cholesterol; 193mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 1/2 Lean Meat;

1 Vegetable; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1 Fat.

 

NOTES : 3 points per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Sprout Salad Pocket

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

4 medium pita bread rounds

8 tsp mayonnaise, imitation

1 cucumber -- thinly sliced

1 medium tomato -- sliced

2 cups sprouts -- assorted kinds

 

Spread both insides of halved pocket bread with mayonnaise. Arrange layers

of vegetables on both sides and stuff the middle with mixed sprouts.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 196 Calories; 2g Fat (7.0% calories

from fat); 7g Protein; 39g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 4mg

Cholesterol; 377mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 1 Vegetable; 0

Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 4 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Sprouts and Spinach Salad

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 cups sprouts -- any kind you like, use at least two varities

2 cups spinach -- washed and torn in bite size pieces

1/2 small onion -- thinly sliced, red onion

1 cup mushrooms -- sliced, fresh

1/2 cup croutons

4 Tbsp lemon juice -- fresh

 

Toss together and serve with lemon juice.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 37 Calories; trace Fat (10.7%

calories from fat); 2g Protein; 7g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 40mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 0

Fruit; 0 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe falls between 0 and 1 point so I count it as 1

point per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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JUNE: OKRA

 

 

 

Vegetable of the Month

 

OKRA!

 

okra_h.jpg

Okra grows in an elongated, lantern shape vegetable. It is a fuzzy, green colored, and ribbed pod that is approximately 2-7 inches in length. This vegetable is more famously known by its rows of tiny seeds and slimy or sticky texture when cut open. Okra is also known as bamia, bindi, bhindi, lady's finger, and gumbo, is a member of the cotton (Mallow) family.

 

Okra was discovered around Ethiopia during the 12th century B.C. and was cultivated by the ancient Egyptians. This vegetable soon flourished throughout North Africa and the Middle East where the seed pods were consumed cooked and the seeds toasted, ground, and served as a coffee substitute. With the advent of the slave trade, it eventually came to North America and is now commonly grown in the southern United States. You’ll now see okra in African, Middle Eastern, Greek, Turkish, Indian, Caribbean, and South American cuisines.

 

Okra is commonly associated in Southern, Creole, and Cajun cooking since it was initially introduced into the United States in its southern region. It grows well in the southern United States where there is little frost.

 

Okra is a powerhouse of valuable nutrients. It is a good source of vitamin C. It is low in calories and is fat-free.

 

Okra

Serving Size 99g or 1/3 medium cucumber Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 15 Calories from Fat 00Total Fat 0g0%Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 0mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 4g1% Dietary Fiber 2g8% Sugars 1gProtein 1gVitamin A6%Vitamin C20%Calcium4%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

Varieties

 

Clemson variety is dark green with angular pods. This okra takes less than two months to mature.

 

Emerald type is dark green, with smooth round pods.

 

Lee is a spineless type known by its deep bright green, very straight angular pods.

 

Annie Oakley is a hybrid, spineless kind of okra with bright green, angular pods. It takes less than two months from seeding to maturity.

 

Chinese okra is a dark green type grown in California and reaches 10 to 13 inches in length. These extra-long okra pods are sometimes called "ladyfingers."

 

Purple Okra a rare variety you may see at peak times. There is a version grown for its leaves that resemble sorrel in New Guinea.

 

Availability, Selection, and Storage

 

Okra is available year-round, with a peak season during the summer months. It is available either frozen or fresh. When buying fresh okra, make sure that you select dry, firm, okra. They should be medium to dark green in color and blemish-free. Fresh okra should be used the same day that it was purchased or stored paper bag in the warmest part of the refrigerator for 2-3 days. Severe cold temperatures will speed up okra decay. Do not wash the okra pods until ready to use, or it will become slimy.

 

Preparation

 

When preparing, remember that the more it is cut, the slimier it will become. Its various uses allow for okra to be added to many different recipes. Okra is commonly used as a thicken agent in soups and stews because of its sticky core. However, okra may also be steamed, boiled, pickled, sautéed, or stir-fried whole. Okra is a sensitive vegetable and should not be cooked in pans made of iron, copper or brass since the chemical properties turns okra black.

 

Young Versus Mature Okra - What is the difference?

 

okra_01.jpgMost okra pods are ready to be harvested in less than two months of planting. If the okra is going be consumed, then these pods must be harvested when they are very young. They are usually picked when they are two to three inches long, or tender stage.

 

Okra pods grow quickly from the tender to tough stage. Pods are considered mature when they exceed three inches in length. Mature okra is tough and is not recommended for use in certain recipes.

 

How do I reduce okra slime?

 

Most people who have eaten or have cooked okra, know about the okra slime. Some recipes call for the whole okra, but how do you deal with the okra slime?

 

There are few ways to minimize the slime:

 

  • Simply trim the off the ends and avoid puncturing the okra capsule.
  • You can also minimize the slime factor by avoiding the tendency to overcook okra.

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Okra Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

 

  • Boil or microwave whole until just tender. Dress with lemon juice and ground pepper.
  • Stew with tomatoes. Serve over rice.
  • Add okra to curries or sauté with spices like cumin, coriander, turmeric, or curry powder.
  • If okra is used in a soup, stew or casserole that requires longer cooking, it should be cut up, to exude its juices, and thicken.
  • Okra pods can be sliced, dipped in egg, breaded with corn meal and baked.
  • Sauté okra with corn kernels, onion and sweet peppers for a tasty side dish.
  • Okra has a similar flavor to eggplant and can be used as a substitute in your favorite recipes.
  • Use raw okra in your tossed salads.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Okra and Cornmeal (soft polenta)

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 cups water

2 cups okra

1 cup white cornmeal

1/2 tsp salt

1/4 cup Butter Buds®

1 tablespoon butter

 

In a large saucepan, bring water to a boil, add okra and cook for about 10

minutes. Remove the okra with a slotted spoon and set aside.

 

Using the same saucepan, increase heat until the water boils briskly.

Slowly add the cornmeal, stirring continuously to prevent lumping. Add the

salt and okra. Cook and continue stirring for 10 to 12 minutes.

 

Remove from heat and add the butter buds, stir to incorporate and then add

the butter and stir again until all the butter is incorporated. Serve hot.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 195 Calories; 3g Fat (16.2%

calories from fat); 4g Protein; 37g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 8mg

Cholesterol; 514mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 1 Vegetable; 1/2

Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 3 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Okra and Green Beans

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 lb okra -- uncut

1 Tbsp olive oil

1 medium onion -- diced

1 lb green beans -- fresh

2 large garlic cloves -- crushed then chopped

1 cup water

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp ground pepper

1 can tomato paste -- (6 ounce)

 

Wash okra pods, trim stems, do not remove caps. Rinse well and drain. Wash

beans and cut into 3 inch lengths. Combine water, tomato paste, olive oil,

onion, garlic, salt and pepper in a sauce pan and mix well. Heat, stirring

frequently, until mixture comes to boil. Add okra and beans and additional

water if necessary to almost cover vegetables.

 

Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer gently until vegetables are

crisp-tender, 20 to 30 minutes. Serve it warm or cold.

 

*This dish can also be oven-baked. Instead of simmering, lightly cover

with aluminum foil and bake for 30 minutes at 350°F.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 96 Calories; 3g Fat (21.8% calories

from fat); 4g Protein; 17g Carbohydrate; 6g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 362mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 3 Vegetable; 1/2

Fat.

 

NOTES : 1 point per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Okra with Rice and Beans

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1/2 cups onions -- chopped

2 cups tomatoes -- chopped

1 tsp sesame oil

1 cup okra -- sliced

2 cloves garlic -- chopped

1/2 cup vegetable broth

2 cups brown rice -- cooked

1 cup black beans -- canned

 

In a medium size saucepan, sauté the onions and tomatoes in the oil for 5

minutes. Add the okra, garlic, salt, pepper and bouillon cube. Cook for 15

to 20 minutes. Serve hot over the rice and beans.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 385 Calories; 3g Fat (8.0% calories

from fat); 13g Protein; 76g Carbohydrate; 8g Dietary Fiber; trace

Cholesterol; 147mg Sodium. Exchanges: 4 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Lean Meat;

1 Vegetable; 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : 7 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Spicy Stir-Fried Okra

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 lb okra pods -- trimmed and slicked into 1/2" thick rounds

1 cup onion -- thinly sliced

1 Tbsp olive oil

5 1/2 tsp lemon juice

1/2 tsp ground cumin

1/4 tsp fennel seed -- ground

1/8 tsp cayenne pepper

1/2 tsp salt

 

In non-stick frying pan, sauté okra and onion in oil, stirring

occasionally, for 15 minutes. If okra looks dry, add 3 tablespoons water

and/or cover the pan during cooking.

 

When vegetables are soft, add in lemon juice. Reduce heat and add cumin,

fennel, cayenne and salt. Stir for 2 minutes, or until flavors are

blended. Serve warm.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 85 Calories; 4g Fat (36.5% calories

from fat); 2g Protein; 12g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 276mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 2

Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : 1 point per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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JULY: GARLIC (Oh yummy! I couldn't wait for this one!)

 

 

 

 

garlic_h.jpg

 

 

 

For years garlic has been the topic of much folklore. In ancient times, its pungent odor was believed to supply strength and courage to those who ate it. Garlic has been used for numerous things including embalming, warding off evil spirits, and curing everything from the common cold to tuberculosis and broken bones.

 

Even in modern times, garlic is still being promoted as a health food with medicinal properties. Though garlic is a nutritious food, many of the claims surrounding it are not backed up by research.

 

Garlic is a member of the Allium genus and classified as Allium sativa. The garlic bulb is covered with a loose, white, crackly outer skin and comprised of individual sections called cloves. Each clove is covered in a white sheath.

 

Garlic is very popular in the Middle East and Mediterranean countries, India and China. In America, 250 million pounds of garlic are consumed per year and its use is growing.

 

Garlic is characterized by it’s strong flavor and smell, stemming from its sulfur compounds. It makes a great flavoring agent for a variety of dishes.

 

 

 

Garlic

 

 

Serving Size (3.0g) Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 5 Calories from Fat 00Total Fat 0g0%Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 0mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 1g0% Dietary Fiber0g0% Sugars 0gProtein 0gVitamin A0%Vitamin C2%Calcium0%Iron0%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

 

Varieties

 

There are approximately 300 varieties of garlic grown throughout the world. In the United States about 90% of the garlic is grown in California and most comes in two types, early and late.

 

Early garlic is white or off-white in color and harvested in mid-summer. Late garlic is off-white on the outside

 

American: white-skinned with a strong flavor.

 

Chileno: a reddish-colored, sharp tasting garlic grown in Mexico

 

Elephant: Not a true garlic, but a relative of the leek; its flavor is very mild and it is characterized by larger heads.

 

Green Garlic: Young garlic before it starts forming cloves. Green garlic looks like a baby leek with a long green top and small white bulb. Its flavor is much more mild than that of mature garlic.

 

Italian: Mauve in color with a somewhat milder flavor.

 

 

Availability, Selection, and Storage

 

Garlic is available year-round frozen or fresh. When buying fresh garlic, choose from plump, dry heads that feel firm. Avoid soft, mushy or shriveled cloves. American garlic should be white to off-white. Garlic should be stored in a cool, dark place (though not a refrigerator) and can be kept for several weeks. Many people use small clay garlic holders to keep their garlic as fresh as possible. Cloves that have sprouted can still be used but they will not be as strong in flavor as fresher cloves. The sprouts themselves can be cut up like scallions and chives and used in dishes.

 

 

Preparation

 

garlic_01.jpgTo remove individual garlic cloves, peel outer layers from the bulb and snap out each clove from the base. Cloves can than be peeled very easily. For a more mild flavor, whole cloves can be added (unpeeled for an even more subtle taste) to food while it cooks or marinates and than discarded before serving the meal. Another trick for imparting a mild garlic flavor in your dish is to spear a garlic clove with a fork and stir your dish with it — discarding the garlic when stirring is complete.

 

For a stronger flavor, used chopped, crushed, pressed or pureed garlic in dishes. The more finely garlic is chopped, the stronger its flavor will be. To chop garlic, cut in half lengthwise (remove the green core if there is one — it is bitter). Make several lengthwise cuts and than cut crosswise. A garlic press can be used also though these can be a bit tricky to clean.

 

To remove garlic odor from hands, use salt or lemon juice and than wash your hands with soap.

 

 

Cooking Garlic

 

Cooking garlic decreases the strength of its flavor making it much milder. The longer it is cooked, the more mild it tastes. Be careful not to sauté garlic too long at too high a temperature, it will brown very quickly and can become bitter.

To bake garlic, place whole, unpeeled bulbs rounded side down in a shallow baking dish, drizzle with oil, cover with foil and bake for 1 1/2 hours at 325ºF.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifAdd garlic to spice up your 5 to 9 A Day Plan!

  • Flavor soups and stews.
  • Roast with meats or poultry.
  • Chop finely for salad dressings.
  • Bake whole heads until softened; pop out soft flesh from cloves and spread on bread.
  • Put minced garlic on a loaf of bread to make an authentic tasting garlic bread!

RECIPES:

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Roasted Squash with Potatoes & Garlic

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 1/2 pounds acorn squash -- washed, halved, seeded and cut into 12 equal pieces

2 pounds potatoes -- unpeeled, washed and quartered, try to use Yukon gold or red potatoes

4 cloves garlic -- peeled and crushed

2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 large sprig rosemary

Preheat oven to 425ºF. Combine squash, potatoes and garlic in 9 x 13-inch

shallow baking pan. Drizzle with oil. Salt and pepper to taste. Top with

rosemary sprig. Bake 45-50 minutes, turning once after vegetables are

browned on one side.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 149 Calories; 4g Fat (20.9%

calories from fat); 3g Protein; 28g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 9mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 0 Vegetable; 1/2

Fat.

NOTES : I peel this squash before baking. You don't have to but

none of my family likes the peel.

 

3 points per serving.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Sesame Garlic Chicken Stir Fry

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

12 ounces chicken breast, no skin, no bone, R-T-C -- sliced across the grain in 1/4-inch strips

3 Tbsp water

5 1/2 Tbsp cornstarch

16 ounces stir fry vegetables -- frozen

1 1/2 Tablespoons vegetable oil

1 medium garlic clove -- peeled and minced

1/2 Tbsp fresh ginger -- peeled and minced

8 Tbsp sesame garlic sauce

1/2 tsp ground white pepper

2 Tbsp sesame seeds -- toasted

Place chicken in small bowl. Add water 1 Tbsp at a time, working in with

hands until water is absorbed into chicken. Sprinkle cornstarch over

chicken and work in with hands to coat all pieces.

Blanch vegetables in boiling water until crisp-tender, 2-3 min; drain and

set aside. Heat nonstick wok or large nonstick skillet on high 2 minutes.

Add vegetable oil; swirl to coat pan (oil should smoke slightly).

Add chicken, garlic, and ginger, stir fry 3 min. Add sesame garlic sauce;

stir fry 2 minutes. Add pepper and vegetables; stir fry to heat through,

30 seconds.

Remove from pan, garnish with sesame seeds.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 228 Calories; 10g Fat (39.2%

calories from fat); 20g Protein; 14g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 52mg

Cholesterol; 57mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 2 1/2 Lean Meat;

0 Vegetable; 1 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : 5 points per serving.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Rustic Roasted Peppers & Garlic

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 16 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

3 whole bell peppers

3 whole yellow peppers

3 whole red bell peppers

4 medium onions -- unpeeled

6 large bulbs garlic

olive oil spray

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon pepper -- freshly ground

2 teaspoons fresh thyme -- chopped

 

Heat oven to 375°. Cut onions in half lengthwise and the garlic in half

across cloves, removing excess skin but not all of it. Pierce the peppers

once or twice to allow steam to escape. Brush the vegetables generously

with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper and thyme. Roast on a rack in a

shallow pan for approximately 45 minutes. Arrange on an attractive platter

with some fresh herbs for garnish.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 30 Calories; trace Fat (4.7%

calories from fat); 1g Protein; 7g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 69mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1 Vegetable; 0 Fat.

 

NOTES : This falls in the catagory of zero points as long as you

only have one serving. Of course, it is soooooo good that

you will have more than that and will have to add a point

as required depending on just how much you eat.

 

This is a family favorite served on toasted thin slices of

Italian bread or any crusty bread(all you do is crush the veggies with a fork and spoon it on the bread). Wonderful with

minestrone! You just spoon a serving on top of the soup and serve!


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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AUGUST: CELERY AND FENNEL

 

 

 

celery_h.jpg

 

 

 

Celery, a household staple to some, an appetizer or snack to others, either way, this beloved vegetable has made its way into millions of households over the years. Celery has its roots in sixteenth century northern European history. Celery is related to anise, carrots, parsley and parsnips.

 

 

 

CeleryServing Size: 60g Amount Per Serving

% Daily Value

 

 

 

 

Calories 10 Calories from Fat 0g Total Fat 0g0% Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 50mg2%Total Carbohydrate 2g1% Dietary Fiber 1g4% Sugars 1gProtein 1gVitamin A 2%Vitamin C6%Calcium2%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

Celery is often sold in loose stalks and also pre-packaged celery hearts. Celery hearts are the inner ribs of the celery. Today celery is predominately grown domestically in California and Florida with many different varieties on the market, the most common being Pascal. A member of the carrot family, celery was first recorded as a plant in France in 1623 and was probably developed either there or in Italy.

 

Its seed was brought to Kalamazoo, Michigan, in the 1850s from Scotland, and it became a commercial crop there.

 

 

Availability and Selection

 

Celery is available year round. Select celery that is compact in shape where the ribs feel firm and crisp and the leaves are green. Avoid celery that is bruised or discolored.

 

 

Storage and Preparation

 

Celery should be refrigerated in a plastic bag and placed in the crisper for up to two weeks. If the ribs are wilted, separate the ribs and place them in a bowl of ice water for several minutes before use.

 

Separate celery ribs and rinse thoroughly as dirt is often lodged between the ribs. To serve raw or in cooked dishes, simply cut to desire length.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Celery Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Eat celery raw or fill with some natural peanut butter for a crunchy snack.
  • Add sliced celery to your favorite green salads for an added crunch.
  • Celery makes a great addition to any vegetable platter.
  • Serve celery alone with a squeeze of lemon juice or vinaigrette dressing.
  • Cooked celery is excellent as a vegetable side dish or in stuffing.
  • Add celery ribs to all your soups and stews for a different texture.
  • Sauté celery in your stir-fry dishes.

Fennelcelery_01.jpg

 

Often mistaken for celery, this vegetable has a different taste that is quite similar to anise or licorice. Fennel is often grown for its seeds and oil from the leaves and used for various food flavorings.

 

FennelServing Size: 44g Amount Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 15 Calories from Fat 0g Total Fat 0g0% Saturated Fat --g--%Sodium 25mg1%Total Carbohydrate 3g1% Dietary Fiber 1g4% Sugars 0gProtein 1gVitamin A 2%Vitamin C8%Calcium2%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

Fennel is native to southern Europe and the Mediterranean area. The name fennel originates from the Greek word for "marathon” which is the famous battle at Marathon in 490 B.C. where the Greeks fought against the Persians who fought on a field of Fennel.

 

 

Availability and Selection

 

Fennel is available year round, with a peak season in fall and winter. Select fennel that are firm, have straight stalks, and green leaves. The bulbs should be compact in shape with the stalks fairly close and not too spread out. Avoid fennel that is discolored or show signs of splitting.

 

 

Storage and Preparation

 

Fennel is more delicate than celery and will dry out quickly. Before storing, cut the stalks off, wrap the stalks separately from the bulb in plastic bags, and store in the crisper section of the refrigerator. Fennel should keep for three to four days, but it is best to use it as soon as possible.

 

Wash fennel stalks thoroughly and use in soups and stews. The feathery leaves can be used as an herb or garnish. The fennel bulb must be washed, trimmed at the base, and then can be sliced as called for in the recipes.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Fennel Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Slice or dice for stews, soups, and stuffing.
  • Add to salads. A traditional salad combines sliced fennel with peeled, sliced oranges; drizzle with olive oil and salt and pepper to taste.
  • Quarter bulbs, then boil or steam until tender. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and breadcrumbs and bake. Or top with light cream sauce and low-fat cheese, and then bake casserole-style.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Apple Fennel Soup

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 cup chicken broth, ff, reduced sodium

2 cup water

1/2 cup white wine

2 apples -- peeled, cored and chopped, use Granny Smith

1 cup carrots -- thinly sliced

1 small onion -- thinly sliced

1 cup fennel -- chopped

1 Bay leaf

1/4 tsp dried thyme leaves

6 Peppercorns

4 tsp yogurt, skim milk

 

In large pot, combine broth, water, wine, apples, carrots, onion, fennel,

bay leaf, thyme and peppercorns; bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer,

covered, 20 minutes. Strain soup, reserving liquid. Remove bay leaf from

apple-vegetable mixture in strainer. In blender or food processor, puree

mixture; add reserved liquid and blend well. Reheat soup, if necessary,

ladle into soup bowls and serve with a dollop of yogurt if desired.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 95 Calories; trace Fat (4.3%

calories from fat); 1g Protein; 18g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; trace

Cholesterol; 33mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1 Vegetable; 1/2

Fruit; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 0 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 1 point per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Braised Fennel with Shallots & Mushrooms

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 bulb fennel -- scrubbed

2 cups chicken broth, ff, reduced sodium

2 Tbsp olive oil

4 oz mushrooms -- sliced, portabella

1/2 cup mushrooms -- sliced, baby portabella or button

2 shallots -- peeled and sliced

1 clove garlic -- minced

 

Trim stems of fennel bulb to within 1/4-inch of bulb. Reserve some leaves

for garnish. Cut fennel into quarters; slice crosswise. Place in saucepan

with broth or water to cover. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer,

partially covered, for 15 minutes, or till tender. Drain; remove. In same

pan, heat oil; sauté portabella and brown mushrooms with shallots and

garlic until tender. Toss with fennel. Garnish with some of the reserved

fennel leaves.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 80 Calories; 7g Fat (73.8% calories

from fat); 1g Protein; 4g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol;

14mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 1 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 2 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Celery Mashed Potatoes

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 lbs potatoes -- cut in 11/2 inch chunks (about 4 cups),unpeeled,use red potatoes

2 cups celery -- diced

1/2 cup milk, skim

1 Tablespoon butter

1/2 tsp celery seeds

1/2 tsp salt

1/8 tsp ground black pepper

 

In a medium saucepan place potatoes, celery, and enough water to cover;

bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer covered, until potatoes are

tender, about 15 minutes. Drain; place vegetables in a large bowl; using a

potato masher or electric mixer, mash until potatoes are nearly smooth. In

a saucepan heat milk and butter until butter is melted; add to vegetables

with celery seeds, salt, if desired, and black pepper; mix until combined.

Serve immediately.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 226 Calories; 3g Fat (12.7%

calories from fat); 6g Protein; 45g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 8mg

Cholesterol; 378mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat;

1/2 Vegetable; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 4 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Fennel & Mushroom Stuffing

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 Tbsp vegetable oil

1 large clove garlic -- finely chopped

4 oz mushrooms -- sliced, portabella

4 oz mushrooms -- sliced, shitake

1 large fennel bulb -- (1 lb) washed, trimmed and thinly sliced

1/3 cup fennel leaves -- chopped

2 cups bread cubes -- dry

1/2 cup chicken broth, ff, reduced sodium

 

Heat oil in skillet. Add garlic and mushrooms and cook on MEDIUM heat

until mushrooms are browned. Add fennel and sauté until tender, but

slightly crunchy. Stir in fennel leaves and bread cubes. Add chicken broth

to moisten stuffing.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 102 Calories; 5g Fat (45.2%

calories from fat); 3g Protein; 12g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 108mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 1

Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 2 points per serving.

 

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Fennel Citrus Salad

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 medium fennel bulb -- thinly sliced

4 medium oranges -- peeled and sliced, navel

1/4 cup red onion -- thinly sliced

1/4 cup Kalamata olives -- pitted

2 tsp olive oil

2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice

 

Combine fennel, oranges, red onion and olives. Drizzle with olive oil and

lemon juice. Toss gently and serve.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 145 Calories; 6g Fat (37.4%

calories from fat); 2g Protein; 22g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 266mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Vegetable; 1

Fruit; 1 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipe is 3 points per serving.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Roast Celery with Apples

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 clove garlic -- crushed

2 Tbsp olive oil

1 1/2 pounds celery -- 1 stalk

2 medium apples -- peeled, cored, and quartered, Golden Delicious

1 cup apple juice

1/4 tsp ground cinnamon

1/4 tsp salt

1/8 tsp ground black pepper

4 slices Italian bread -- toasted

 

Preheat oven to 375°F. Place garlic and oil in a 13 x 9 x 2-inch baking

pan; bake until oil is hot, about 5 minutes. Meanwhile trim base of

celery; cut celery stalk crosswise, about 7 inches from base (save top for

soups, stews, etc); cut stalk lengthwise into 4 wedges. Place celery,

apples, apple juice, cinnamon, salt and pepper in baking pan; bake,

uncovered, until celery is crisp-tender, about 40 minutes, basting with

pan juices every 10 to 15 minutes; discard garlic. Serve immediately over

Italian bread.

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 210 Calories; 8g Fat (32.7%

calories from fat); 3g Protein; 34g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 384mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 Vegetable; 1

Fruit; 1 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : This recipes is 4 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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SEPTEMBER: CHILI PEPPERS

 

 

 

 

 

 

chili_h.jpg

 

Hot peppers (chilies) are often used to spice up dishes, and they are especially popular in ethnic cuisine including Mexican, Indian, Thai, Vietnamese, Arab and Spanish cooking. Chilies are an excellent source of vitamin C if you can withstand their powerful bite.

 

Chili PeppersServing Size: 46g Amount Per Serving

 

% Daily Value

 

Calories 10 Calories from Fat 0g Total Fat 0g0% Saturated Fat 0g0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Sodium 50mg2%Total Carbohydrate 2g1% Dietary Fiber 2g8% Sugars 1gProtein 1gVitamin A 4%Vitamin C60%Calcium2%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

Contrary to popular belief, the hottest part of the chili pepper is not the seeds but where the seed attaches to the white membrane inside the pepper. This area has the highest concentration of capsaicinoids. Capsaicinoids are flavorless, odorless substances that act on pain receptors in the mouth and throat. Capsaicin is the primary capsaicinoid. Capsaicinoids can be found throughout the flesh of chili peppers though their concentration varies in different areas so that one part of a pepper may be hot and another part of the same pepper quite mild.

 

The seeds are often hot because they are in such close contact with the white membrane.

 

There are several varieties of chili peppers (see box below) and each differs in flavor and heat intensity. Even within each variety, there may differences in how “hot” each particular chili is. Typically, larger chilies are more mild because they contain less seeds and white membrane in proportion to their size. Most varieties can be found dried, canned, or fresh.

 

 

Varieties

 

chili_anaheim.jpgAnaheim (California Green Chile or Long Green Chile): One of the most commonly used varieties in the United States, especially in stuffed chiles. This chili is long, slender and lobed, green or red in color and mildly hot. They can be eaten when green or when they are their mature red color. chili_ancho.jpgAncho: Dried or fresh poblano pepper. Dried anchos are flat, wrinkled, and heart shaped. They range in color from very dark red to almost black. Anchos are mild to moderately hot and often soaked and ground for use in sauces.chili_cascabel.jpgCascabel: Green or red, small and round, moderately hot and typically available dried. When dried, their skin turns a translucent red-brown color and their seeds rattle inside.chili_cayenne.jpgCayenne (Long Hots): Red when fully mature, long (6 to 10 inches), thin and straight or curled at the tips. Very hot. Cayenne can be found dried and ground into a powder that is seen as generic "red pepper" in the spice aisle. chili_cherry.jpgCherry: Round and red like a cherry. Sold fresh or pickled in jars, these peppers range from mild to moderately hot.chili_habanero.jpgHabanero (Scotch Bonnet): Typically yellow-orange but they can be green, red, or orange. These peppers are lantern shaped and typically about 2 inches long. The hottest pepper grown commercially; intense fiery flavor; a unique floral flavor and an extremely intense heat that affects the nasal passages.chili_hungarian.jpgHungarian: These peppers start out yellow and ripen to orange or red; they are moderately hot. chili_jalapeno.jpgJalapeńo: Most often green when mature but sometimes red, these peppers are about 2 inches in length with cracks around their stems. They are very hot, with an immediate bite. Jalapeńos are sold canned, sliced, and pickled and are added to many products during processing including sausage, cheese, and jelly.chili_poblano.jpgPoblano: Ancho peppers that are green. Poblano peppers look like small bell peppers and are mild to hot in taste. They are often roasted and peeled prior to being used in soups, sauces, casseroles or even stuffed with meat and cheese for a dish called chilies rellenos.chili_serrano.jpgSerrano: Sold red or mature green and about 1 to 4 inches in length. Moderate to very hot with an intense bite. Serrano chilis are often used in Thai cooking and they are also quite popular in Mexico and the southwestern United States.

 

 

Availability, Selection, and Storage

 

Chili peppers are available year round and in the United States they are grown in California, New Mexico and Texas. When selecting chilies, look for firm, glossy chilies with taut, unwrinkled skin and fresh green stems. Dried hot peppers should be glossy yet unbroken.

 

Chilies should be stored unwashed and wrapped in paper towels in the refrigerator for up to three weeks. Dried chilies should be stored in airtight containers at room temperature for a maximum of four months. To keep dried chilies for more than four months, store them in the refrigerator.

 

 

Preparation

 

It is very important not to touch your nose, eyes or mouth after handling or eating hot peppers. If you do, flush with water immediately. The capsaicin in the peppers can be extremely painful to your eyes and can even burn or irritate your skin (especially if you have cuts on your hands).

 

If possible, wear thin rubber gloves while preparing chili peppers. Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water when done working with chilies. If the bite is too strong when you eat a chili, chew on bread or another starchy food; water only makes the bite worse as it spreads it.

 

To decrease the heat intensity of chilies, wash them, cut them open and remove the seeds and veins. Also, soaking cut up chilies in salt water for at least an hour will help cool them off.

 

To add a mild pepper flavor to your dish, poke holes in the chili of your choice with a toothpick (or cut slits in it) and add it to a food that is already cooking. When cooking is complete, remove the chili from the dish.

 

Chilies can also be roasted whole over a gas stove, broiler, or on a grill. Use a cooking fork to hold each pepper over flame. Turn frequently until the chili’s skin is blackened. After cooking is complete, place chilies in a paper or plastic bag for 15 minutes. Scrape off skin, cut off stem and pull out core. Scrape any remaining seeds.

 

 

Preparing Dried Hot Peppers

 

Use a damp cloth to wipe peppers. Grind chilies in a food processor for use as chili powder. To soften their texture and make their flavor more mild, soak chili peppers in water prior to using.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifMake Chili Peppers Part of Your 5 A Day Plan

  • Cut up and add to pizza as a topping!
  • Dice and add to your favorite salsa recipe or any
    store bought salsa.
  • Chop finely and add to salads.
  • Serve as a garnish next to a meal and eat the garnish!
  • Add to stews and soups for a stronger flavor.
  • Sprinkle chopped hot peppers into meat loaf, tomato sauce or macaroni and cheese.
  • Cook in corn bread for a zesty jalapeńo corn bread.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Matbucha (Cooked Red Pepper and Tomato Salad)

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 whole red peppers

2 whole tomatoes, red ripe

2 Tbsp oil

1 Tbsp paprika

3 tsp garlic -- crushed

1/4 tsp salt

3 small chili peppers -- dried

1 cup cooked rice

 

Place peppers on an open flame. Turn the peppers until they become

blackened and are burned on all sides. Place peppers in a plastic bag and

let cool.

Place tomatoes in a deep bowl and pour boiling water over them. After a

few minutes remove tomatoes from water and peel them. Cut tomatoes in half

and squeeze out the juice (which you can save for pasta sauce or discard).

Chop the tomatoes into large pieces. Place oil and chopped tomatoes in a

large pot.

Place blackened peppers under running water and peel them. Cut the peppers

into thin strips. Add peppers to the pot with the tomatoes. Add the spices

and chopped garlic. Cook on high heat until the mixture begins to stick to

the pot. Reduce the heat and cook for about half an hour until hardly any

liquid is left in the pot. Serve over rice.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 171 Calories; 8g Fat (37.9%

calories from fat); 3g Protein; 24g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 144mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 2

Vegetable; 1 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : 3 points per serving.

 

This is served as a main dish salad. If you prefer it as

a side, it will serve 8 and be 1 point per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Roasted Pepper & Banana Relish

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 cup green pepper -- (one large)

2 cups bananas -- diced fine (about 4)

1/2 Tbsp mint leaves -- chopped fine

3 Tbsp lime juice

2 Tbsp brown sugar

1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

2 jalapeno pepper, whole -- seeded, diced fine (wear gloves)

1 medium red pepper -- (about 1/2 lb) cored, seeded, diced fine

 

 

Preheat grill on HIGH 10 for minutes.

Clean grill with wire brush; using soft cloth, coat grill lightly with

vegetable oil.

Grill whole green pepper to char all sides, about 15 minutes. Remove from

grill; place in bowl. Cover with plastic wrap; let rest 5 minutes. Remove

from bowl; peel, core, seed, and dice.

Combine all ingredients in medium bowl. Relish can be served with hot

dogs, grilled fish and meats and many other dishes!

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 177 Calories; 4g Fat (19.0%

calories from fat); 2g Protein; 37g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 5mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Vegetable; 2 Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 1/2

Other Carbohydrates.

 

NOTES : 3 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Salsa Fresca

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 20 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 lbs ground beef, 95% lean

1 lb sausage -- hot Italian variety

5 1/2 cups onions -- large dice

5 1/2 cups green pepper -- large dice

1 cup celery -- large dice

1 Tbsp jalapeno chile pepper -- minced

4 cloves garlic cloves -- minced

3 Tbsp chili powder

1 Tbsp cumin

1 Tbsp oregano -- dried

1 tsp cayenne pepper

6 ozs tomato paste

4 cups beef stock

3 cups tomatoes, red ripe -- large dice

15 ozs tomato sauce

2 cups zucchini -- large dice

2 cups squash, crookneck -- large dice

5 1/2 cups red kidney beans, canned

5 1/2 cups black beans, canned

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

 

This meal can be cooked in a crock pot (add all ingredients and cook for

on low for 1 hour or longer).

Brown ground beef and sausage in a large pot, remove grease and add

onions, peppers, celery, jalapeno, and garlic. Saute over a medium heat

for about 5 minutes. Add dry spices and continue to cook for 2-3 more

minutes.

Add tomato paste, beef stock, tomato sauce, and fresh tomatoes and simmer

on low heat for 1 hour, stirring frequently.

Add beans, zucchini and squash and cook for 20 more minutes. Season with

salt and pepper and serve.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 392 Calories; 12g Fat (34.0%

calories from fat); 17g Protein; 34g Carbohydrate; 12g Dietary Fiber; 28mg

Cholesterol; 1321mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean Meat;

2 Vegetable; 1 1/2 Fat.

 

 

NOTES : 8 points per serving.

 

Portions are large, this recipe can be cut in fourths or

halves.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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OCTOBER: RHIZOMES

 

I think that for our purposed here, we will devote the recipes to ginger and turmeric powder exclusively as most of us can't find the other rhizome in the article.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rhizome_h.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spice up your Food!

 

Rhizomes are knobby underground stems that are known for their pungent and flavorful flesh. The rhizome family includes ginger, turmeric and galangal among a few other, lesser known rhizomes. Rhizomes are not a significant source of any nutrients – most especially because they are rarely eaten in great enough quantities to constitute a serving. Ginger is a tropical Asian herb that is known for its spicy aromatic roots. In ancient India, ginger was believed to spiritually cleanse the body.

 

GingerServing Size: 48g Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 40 Calories from Fat 0g Total Fat 0g0% Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 5mg0%Total Carbohydrate 9g3% Dietary Fiber 1g4% Sugars 1gProtein 1gVitamin A 0%Vitamin C4%Calcium0%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

 

Gingerroot

 

It was also used in ancient times as a food preservative and to help treat digestive problems. To treat digestive problems, Greeks would eat ginger wrapped in bread. Eventually ginger was added to the bread dough creating that wonderful treat many around the globe love today: gingerbread!

 

Ginger ale eventually stemmed from a ginger beer made by the English and Colonial America as a remedy for diarrhea, nausea and vomiting.

 

Ginger thrives in the tropics and warmer regions and is therefore currently grown in parts of West Africa, the West Indies, India and China with the best quality ginger coming from Jamaica where it is most abundant. In the United States, ginger is grown in Florida, Hawaii, and along the eastern coast of Texas.

 

Gingerroot is characterized by it’s strong sweet, yet woodsy smell. It is tan in color with white to creamy-yellow flesh that can be coarse yet stringy.

 

 

Galangal

 

GalangalServing Size: 64g Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 45 Calories from Fat 5g Total Fat 0g0% Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 10mg2%Total Carbohydrate10g3% Dietary Fiber 2g8% Sugars 0gProtein 1gVitamin A 2%Vitamin C6%Calcium0%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

Galangal (guh-LANG-gul) comes from the plant Alpinia galanga (or Languas galangal) and has many common names including greater galangal, galangale, and galang.

 

The rhizome (root) of galangal resembles ginger in taste and appearance. It is predominantly found in Asian markets and sold fresh, frozen, dried, or powdered. Galangal is also well known in European medieval cooking. Only a pinch of dried and powdered versions are typically needed.

 

Galangal is frequently used in fish and shellfish recipes in combination with garlic, ginger, chilli, and lemon.

 

 

Galangal Varieties

 

Greater Galangal: Orange-brown skin with pale yellow or white interior. Greater galangal can be found in sliced form or powder. Used as a flavoring throughout Indonesia, Malaysia, and parts of India.

Flavor: Not as pungent as lesser galangal.

 

Lesser Galangal: This rhizome has a red-brown interior and fibrous texture. It can be founded as slices or powder. Lesser galangal comes from China where it is used as a medicinal herb, but it is now grown in Indonesia and regarded as a spice.

Flavor: Aromatic and pungent, peppery and ginger-like. Stronger, more medicinal taste than greater galangal.

 

Kaempferia Galangal: Often identified as greater galangal. Red skin and white interior. Used as a flavoring in South East Asia.

Flavor: Medium in strength.

 

Different galangal varieties vary in their hotness and flavor. Flavor ranges from flowery to ginger-like to peppery cinnamon (see box below).

 

In addition to being used as a spice in cooking, galangal has been used in Asia and the Middle East in perfumes, snuffs, aphrodisiacs, and as flavors for condiments (including vinegar and beer), in teas in Germany and wines in Russia. Like ginger, galangal has been used for medicinal purposes to treat nausea, flatulence, and dyspepsia.

 

 

Tumeric

 

Tumeric is the root of a tropical plant that has been used in cooking since 600 B.C. It is native to the Orient and now can be found in India and the Caribbean. It has a bitter, pungent almost woodsy flavor, is yellowish-orange in color.

 

The tumeric root has light brown skin and bright reddish-orange flesh. Turmeric was used in biblical times as a perfume but now it is most commonly used to flavor and color food. Ground turmeric is widely used in East Indian cooking particularly in curries as well as other soups and stews.

 

 

Rhizomes: Availability, Selection, and Storage

 

Rhizomes can be found as roots in some Asian grocery stores, farmers markets and natural food stores (gingerroot can even be found in many chain grocery stores). In spice form, ginger and tumeric can be found in almost any food store.

 

Galangal

When ripe, galangal should be ivory white and firm with very little separation between skin and flesh. Never buy galangal that is wrinkled or shriveled. Store refrigerated uncut and unwrapped for up to 3 weeks or, peel the root and place it in a jar of sherry and store it refrigerated for several months. Galangal can be frozen if tightly wrapped in foil.

 

Ginger

Ginger is available year-round. When selecting gingerroot, choose robust firm roots with a spicy fragrance and smooth skin. Gingerroot should not be cracked or withered. It can be stored tightly wrapped in a paper towel or plastic wrap (or put into a plastic bag) in the refrigerator for 2–3 weeks and like galangal, gingerroot can also be placed in a jar of sherry and refrigerated for 3–6 months.

 

Tumeric

Fresh tumeric roots should have a spicy fragrance and stubby fingers protruding from the sides of the root. Refrigerate unpeeled tumeric, tightly wrapped, for 3 weeks.

 

 

Preparation

 

Galangal

Galangal can be sliced and used to flavor soups and stews (remove before serving). It can also be mixed with lemon grass, chilies, shallots and garlic into a paste that can be used to flavor rice dishes. Galangal can also be mixed into a curry paste for similar purposes.

 

Ginger

Peel skin from the root and gently peel the skin beneath (that closest to the root is the most flavorful). Gingerroot can be sliced or minced (minced gingerroot gives the most pungent flavor). Ginger is popular in Asian cuisine where it is used both fresh and dried. Ginger can also be found crystallized, candied, preserved and pickled.

 

The powdered, dried form of ginger has a more spicy, intense flavor and is often used in baking (gingerbread, gingersnaps, ginger cookies).

 

Tumeric

Tumeric is typically boiled or steamed and then dried and ground into powder. Use ground tumeric in fish or rice dishes. Be careful with fresh turmeric, it will stain your hands and clothing.

 

Saffron (very expensive) is sometimes substituted for tumeric.

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gifInclude Rhizomes to spice your 5 to 9 A Day Plan!

  • Ginger can be used raw or cooked; use sparingly
    at first to become acquainted with the pungent taste.
  • Chop ginger finely and sauté with garlic as a flavor base for oriental stir-fries.
  • Add powdered tumeric to rice dishes for coloring and flavor.
  • Soups and stews can be flavored with tumeric.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Ginger Smashed Potatoes with Dill

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

8 red potatoes, whole -- washed and quartered (small, unpeeled)

16 ounces vegetables -- frozen, bag

1 teaspoon salt

1 tsp ginger root -- grated

3/4 cup milk, skim

1 Tablespoon butter

1 Tbsp dill -- fresh, chopped

Place potatoes and vegetables in soup pot, cover with cold water; add

salt. Bring to boil, covered, on HIGH heat; reduce to simmer.

Simmer until potatoes are tender, 25-30 min. Drain; return potato mixture

to pot. Add ginger, cream and butter.

Smash potato mixture with potato masher or beat with handheld mixer to

desired consistency. Add dill; season with salt and pepper to taste.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 162 Calories; 3g Fat (16.9%

calories from fat); 5g Protein; 30g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 9mg

Cholesterol; 597mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 0 Vegetable; 0

Non-Fat Milk; 1/2 Fat.

 

NOTES : Assume a serving to be 3/4 cup or two potatoes each which

is a generous portion.

 

3 points per serving.

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Gingered Beef with Broccoli

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

2 cups broccoli -- crowns only

3/4 lb beef loin -- sliced for stir fry

3 Tbsp water

5 1/2 Tbsp cornstarch

2 Tbsp vegetable oil

1 Tbsp ginger root -- unpeeled, minced

3/4 cup chicken broth, ff, reduced sodium

1 cup red pepper -- cut in 1-inch pieces

1/2 cup mushrooms, whole -- shitakes are preferred, stemmed

1/2 cup snow peas -- trimmed

Rinse broccoli. Microwave, covered on HIGH for 3 minutes; drain. Place

beef in a small bowl. Pour in water, 1 Tbsp at a time, working in with

hands until water is absorbed into beef. Sprinkle cornstarch over beef and

work in with hands to coat all pieces.

Heat nonstick wok or skillet on HIGH. When hot, pour 1 Tbsp oil down sides

of pan. Add ginger and beef; stir-fry just until beef browns.

Add broth and toss to coat; remove beef from pan. Add remaining oil. Add

broccoli to pan along with peppers, mushrooms and snow peas. Stir-fry 2

min. Return beef with sauce to pan; toss to heat through, about 30

seconds.

Serve with steamed rice.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 227 Calories; 15g Fat (59.1%

calories from fat); 12g Protein; 11g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 38mg

Cholesterol; 39mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 1/2 Lean Meat;

2 Vegetable; 2 Fat.

 

NOTES : 5 points per serving, be sure to add the points for the

rice.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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Share on other sites

NOVEMBER: GREENS

 

 

 

5 A Day: Vegetable of the Month: Cooking Greens

 

 

 

 

 

greens_h.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cooking greens are a Southern tradition – and superstitiously thought to bring good luck for the upcoming year when eaten on New Year’s Day. They include any type of cabbage where the green leaves do not form a compact head. Collard, mustard, kale, swiss chard, and broccoli rabe are all varieties of cooking greens.

 

Collard Greens

 

Collards are the oldest known greens in the cabbage family dating back to ancient times because of their similarity to cabbage eaten by prehistoric people. In addition, ancient Greeks and Romans cultivated collard greens.

 

Collards are native to the eastern Mediterranean region and Asia Minor. In approximately 400 B.C. they were brought to Britain and France by either the Romans or Celts. The first documentation of collard greens in America was in 1669 though it is possible they were present in the colonies at an even earlier date.

 

Collard greens grow best in warm weather though they can withstand the cold temperatures of late autumn. Interestingly enough, the flavor of collard greens is enhanced by a light frost.

 

Collard GreensServing Size: 1 cup Amount Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 10 Calories from Fat 0g Total Fat 0g0% Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 5mg0%Total Carbohydrate 2g1% Dietary Fiber 1g4% Sugars 0gProtein 1gVitamin A 50%Vitamin C20%Calcium6%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

Mustard Greens

 

Mustard greens are the most pungent of the cooking greens and lend a peppery flavor to food. They originated in the Himalayan region of India more than 5,000 years ago. Like many other cooking greens, mustard can be found in many Chinese, African-American, and southern dishes. Brassica juncea, the mustard plant, is characterized by it’s crumpled or flat leaves that may have scalloped, frilled or lacey edges. In addition, this plant produces the brown seeds that are used to make Dijon mustard.

 

Mustard greens are an excellent source of both vitamins A and C and contain several other vitamins and minerals as well as fiber and protein.

 

 

 

Mustard GreensServing Size: 1 cup Amount Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 15 Calories from Fat 0g Total Fat 0g0% Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 15mg1%Total Carbohydrate 3g1% Dietary Fiber 2g8% Sugars 1gProtein 1gVitamin A 120%Vitamin C70%Calcium6%Iron4%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

Kale

 

Like other greens, kale descends from wild cabbage that originated in Asia Minor though it is known for it’s popularity in Scandinavia, Germany, Holland and Scotland. Kale was brought to the United States in the 17th century by English settlers. It is now a favorite in the southern United States where, like many cooking greens, it has been considered a poor man’s food.

 

With long ruffled leaves that resemble large parsley sprigs and hues that vary from lavender to chartreuse, kale has a mild cabbage-like taste and delicate texture.

 

Like most cooking greens, kale can grow in colder temperatures and withstand frost — which actually helps produce even sweeter leaves. Kale can also grow well in the hot weather in the southern United States and in poor soil. Kale is an excellent source of vitamin A, folic acid, and vitamin C and contains both protein and fiber.

 

KaleServing Size: 1 cup Amount Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 35 Calories from Fat 0g Total Fat 0g0% Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 30mg1%Total Carbohydrate 7g2% Dietary Fiber 1g4% Sugars 0gProtein 1gVitamin A 210%Vitamin C130%Calcium10%Iron6%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

Swiss Chard

 

The vegetable’s scientific name is beta vulgaris subspecies cicla with the word cicla referring to Sicily where swiss chard first grew. Its popular name stems from the fact that a Swiss botanist determined the plant’s scientific name. Today, swiss chard is most popular in the Mediterranean. Swiss chard can also be found in northern Europe and South America.

 

Swiss chard is extremely versatile, has a mild sweet yet slightly bitter flavor (similar to beets), and has large green leaves with ribs running throughout. The leaves can be smooth or curly and are attached to fleshy, crunchy white, red or yellow celery-like stalks.

 

Swiss chard is an excellent source of vitamins A and C, and also contains potassium and fiber.

 

 

 

Swiss ChardServing Size: 1 cup Amount Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 5 Calories from Fat 0g Total Fat 0g0% Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 75mg2%Total Carbohydrate 1g0% Dietary Fiber 1g4% Sugars 0gProtein 1gVitamin A 45%Vitamin C20%Calcium2%Iron4%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

Broccoli Rabe

 

Broccoli rabe was originally cultivated in the southern Mediterranean. It was brought to the United States in the 1920’s by Italian farmers. Broccoli rabe has been most popular in the Italian and Asian communities for the past several years.

 

Broccoli rabe looks similar to thin broccoli stalks with small clusters of buds and smooth leaves with sawtooth edges. Broccoli rabe has a somewhat bitter taste and should be cooked to help mellow that taste. It is an excellant source of vitamin C and also contains beta-carotene, fiber, and phytochemicals.

 

Broccoli RabeServing Size: 1 cup Amount Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 15 Calories from Fat 0g Total Fat 0g0% Saturated Fat 0g0%Sodium 15mg1%Total Carbohydrate 3g1% Dietary Fiber 0g0% Sugars 1gProtein 2gVitamin A 70%Vitamin C90%Calcium2%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

 

 

Availability, Selection, and Storage

 

greens_collard.jpgCollard Greens

Though available year-round, collard greens are at their peak from January through April. The best collards are found in crisp bunches with leaves still intact. Collards can also be found canned. Fresh collards should be stored in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator or in a plastic bag with holes in it.

 

greens_mustard.jpgMustard Greens

Mustard greens can be found year-round though they are at their peak from December through April. Mustard greens come in many different varieties and can be found dark, light, short, fat, smooth, curly etc. In the United States, the leaves on mustard greens are typically soft, green and oval-shaped, frilled at the edges (similar to romaine lettuce) and attached to long stems. When selecting these greens, be sure to avoid those that have yellow or brown leaves, dry leaves, or coarse, fibrous stems. If you plan to use the mustard greens for salad it is wise to pick very small leaves whereas any size leaves will do if you are cooking them.

 

Mustard greens should be wrapped tightly in plastic and kept in the refrigerator. However, they only last a few days quickly becoming faded, dry and yellow.

 

greens_kale.jpgKale

Kale is available year-round though it is most flavorful and abundant during the winter months. It is best to select small, deep-colored kale bunches with clean leaves. Avoid kale with dry leaves as well as that with dry, browned, yellowed or coarse stems. In the marketplace kale should be kept refrigerated or on ice (or in an outdoor market in the winter).

 

Best when kept at 32°, kale should be stored wrapped in plastic in the refrigerator crisper. Kale can only be kept for a few days.

 

greens_chard.jpgSwiss Chard

Swiss chard is available from spring through the fall with a peak from June through October. Choose swiss chard that has crisp stalks and firm, bright leaves. Like other greens, chard should be wrapped in plastic and can be kept in the refrigerator for approximately 2 days. If blanched, swiss chard greens can be frozen. Boil greens for 2 minutes, drain, chill in ice water and drain again and pack in an airtight container.

 

greens_broccoli.jpgBroccoli Rabe

Broccoli rabe is available year-round (with the exception possibly being June and July) though its peek season is between late fall and early spring. It is grown in Quebec, California, Arizona, and other states.

 

Broccoli rabe can be found in a refrigerator case sprinkled with ice because it wilts very easily. When selecting this vegetable, choose firm, green, small stems with compact heads and flower buds that are tightly closed and dark green, not open or yellow.

 

Broccoli rabe should be stored in a refrigerator crisper unwashed, either wrapped in a wet towel or in a plastic bag for a maximum of three days. To keep it longer, blanch and freeze it.

 

 

Preparation

 

Prior to cleaning greens, any wilted or yellow leaves should be removed. Next, dunk greens into a bowl of tepid water a few times to clean. Drain and use a salad spinner to dry greens for use in salads. For use in cooking, it is not necessary to completely dry leaves.

 

Traditionally, greens are boiled or simmered very slowly with a piece of ham hock for an extended period of time until they are quite soft. This softens the texture and decreases some of their bitter flavor. Greens can also be steamed, microwaved, added to soups, salads, stews, and other dishes.

 

To decrease the bitterness of greens, blanch them in boiling water for approximately one minute prior to cooking (though this does diminish some if their nutritional value), the color, flavor and texture will be preserved. Greens can than be sautéed (do not use aluminum or iron pans), or added to various dishes during cooking.

 

Broccoli rabe is very bitter when raw so it is recommended to cook this vegetable.

 

5_to_9_small_trans_peach.gif Include Cooking Greens in your 5 to 9 A Day Plan!

  • Chop cooking greens and add to salads.
  • Stir-fry greens and add your favorite meat and
    Seasonings.
  • Sliver greens and add them to broths, stews and soups — they are great for livening up the flavor of more mild vegetables.
  • Chop cooked greens for use in stuffing, custards, and eye dishes.
  • Combine chopped greens, pine nuts, and feta cheese with whole grain pasta drizzled with olive oil.
  • Serve greens as a side dish. They can be served chilled with olive oil and lemon juice or sautéed with onions and garlic or other seasonings.
  • Don’t forget to include greens with your New Year’s meal for good luck!

* Exported from MasterCook *

 

Lentil and Swiss Chard Soup

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 cup lentils

1 lb swiss chard -- washed, trimmed and chopped into 1/2 inch strips

6 3/4 cups water

10 cloves garlic -- peeled

1/4 tsp salt

1/2 cup lemon juice -- fresh squeezed

2 Tbsp olive oil

 

Put the lentils and water in a large saucepan and place over high heat.

Bring to a boil, add the chopped chard, and reduce the heat to medium.

Cover the pan and boil gently for 15 minutes. Mix the softened chard and

the lentils well and cook uncovered for another 45 minutes.

 

In the meantime, place the garlic cloves in a mortar, add a generous pinch

of salt, and pound with a pestle until you have a smooth paste. Slowly

incorporate the lemon juice into the garlic paste, then do the same with

the olive oil. Add the garlic mixture to the soup. Season with salt and

simmer uncovered for 5 minutes. Serve at room temperature.

 

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 262 Calories; 7g Fat (24.0%

calories from fat); 16g Protein; 37g Carbohydrate; 17g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 393mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean Meat; 1

Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 1 1/2 Fat.

NOTES : 5 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Poached Eggs with Collard Greens

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

5 cups collard greens -- stems removed, chopped

1 medium onion -- cut in half and thinly sliced

1/2 cup shiitake mushrooms -- sliced medium thick with stems removed, about 5 mushrooms

4 large eggs

about 4 cups water

1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar -- or any white wine vinegar

Dressing

1 Tbsp lemon juice -- fresh

1 Tbsp ginger -- fresh, minced

2 cloves garlic -- pressed

1 Tbsp soy sauce

1 Tbsp olive oil

salt and white pepper to taste over

collard greens & shiitake mushrooms

 

Bring lightly salted water to a boil in a steamer. Rinse greens well, fold

leaves in half and chop. Steam for about 7 minutes. Add mushrooms, onion

and steam for another 5 minutes.

 

While steaming greens, get ready for poaching by bringing water and

vinegar to a fast simmer in a small, shallow pan. You can start on high

heat, and once it comes to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer before adding

eggs. Make sure there is enough water to cover eggs.

 

Mix together lemon juice, ginger, garlic, soy sauce, olive oil, salt, and

pepper in a small bowl.

 

When greens are almost done, poach eggs until desired doneness. This will

take about 5 minutes, or just until the white is set and the yolk has

filmed over.

 

Press greens with the back of a spoon slightly to remove excess water.

Remove vegetables from steamer and toss with dressing. Remove eggs from

water with a slotted spoon and place on plate of tossed greens.

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 226 Calories; 9g Fat (32.9%

calories from fat); 11g Protein; 30g Carbohydrate; 6g Dietary Fiber; 212mg

Cholesterol; 342mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean Meat; 1

Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 1 Fat.

NOTES : 4 points per serving.

 

 

 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Quinoa with Broccoli Rabe

 

Recipe By :

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories :

 

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 cup quinoa

2 cups chicken broth, ff, reduced sodium

2/3 cup onion -- chopped

1 tsp garlic -- minced

1 lb broccoli rabe -- trimmed and chopped

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

 

Toast quinoa, stirring, in nonstick skillet over medium-low heat, 5

minutes. Bring broth and water to boil in medium saucepan; stir in quinoa.

Reduce heat to medium-low; cover and simmer 12 to 15 minutes until liquid

is absorbed and quinoa is tender. Fluff with fork and transfer to large

bowl; cover and keep warm.

 

Heat a small amount of water or broth in large nonstick skillet over

medium-high heat. Add onion and garlic; cook 3 minutes. Stir in broccoli

rabe, salt and red pepper. Cook until broccoli rabe is tender, 5 to 7

minutes. Stir vegetables into quinoa. Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 170 Calories; 3g Fat (13.0%

calories from fat); 6g Protein; 32g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg

Cholesterol; 144mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 1/2

Fat.

 

NOTES : 3 points per serving.


Barbara

~~~~~~~~

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cybergranny49/sets/

original starting weight 270

returned to WW Oct. 12, 2005

241.4/142/155

Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.

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