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Is anyone else here a big fan of Korean food? I think I could eat it everyday! :headover:

 

My favorite is Bi-bim-bob, but I've never really had anything at a Korean restaurant that I didn't like. They have the most wonderful little array of side dishes -- including soy bean sprouts which are fantastic (MUCH better than mung bean sprouts). I really wish sesame oil was one of the "healthy" oils so that I could use it every day!


189.8 :bcb_yuck: /140/140 /pg135

Maintaining since 5/18/06 :bcbkickbu

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Guest wandaf

We have a South Korean exchange student living with us this year. She has cooked for us twice. I liked the dishes both times. We don't have a lot of the ingredients she needs in our small town though.

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my bf's mother is Korean, and she is a wonderful cook! She is a very healthy person, so she cooks a lot of the dishes very very healthy. She doesn't ever use sesame oil, only olive oil, no butter, etc. Very good stuff though, let me tell you!! :)


Brooke ~ HW: 217.0 ~ SW: 211.6 (10/24/09)~ CW: 208.2 (as of 12/12/09) ~ WWGW: 155 ~ PGW: 145

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Guest canadakaren

I hear ya!

MMMmmmmm I love love love Korean! It's my fav!

I'm in Toronto Canada, we have a great Korean area!

In fact, Kimchie is no points (it's pickled napa cabbage w/ hot hot pepper)

Plan is to make some ourselves. I'd love a low fat kimchie stew recipie...anyone have one?

 

Karen

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Guest canadakaren

Trying these this week...they both look great!

Korean-Style Beef and Pasta

Makes 8 (1-cup) servings - 4 Points

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Image © Publications International, Ltd. Korean-Style Beef and Pasta

 

DotsVert200.gif Rice noodles, also know as rice sticks, are made from rice flour and are as thin as string. They are usually coiled into nests and packaged in plastic bags. Ingredients 1 beef top round steak (about 3/4 pound) 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce 1 tablespoon rice wine 2 teaspoons sugar Korean-Style Dressing (recipe follows) 1 package (6-3/4 ounces) rice noodles 2 cups thinly sliced napa cabbage 1-3/4 cups thinly sliced yellow bell peppers 1/2 cup thinly sliced radishes 1 medium carrot, shredded 2 green onions, thinly sliced

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1. Freeze beef until partially firm; cut into very thin slices.

 

2. Combine soy sauce, rice wine and sugar in small nonmetallic bowl. Add beef slices; toss to coat evenly. Cover and refrigerate 8 hours or overnight.

 

3. Drain and grill beef over medium-hot coals 2 to 3 minutes or until desired doneness.

 

4. Meanwhile, prepare Korean-Style Dressing; set aside.

 

5. Cook noodles in boiling water 1 to 2 minutes or until tender; drain and rinse under cold water. Arrange noodles on serving platter.

 

6. Combine cabbage, bell peppers, radishes, carrot, green onions and beef in medium bowl. Add Korean-Style Dressing; toss to coat evenly. Serve over noodles. Garnish with green onion brush and carrot ribbons, if desired.

 

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Korean-Style Dressing

Ingredients 2 teaspoons sesame seeds 1/3 cup orange juice 2 tablespoons rice wine 2 teaspoons reduced-sodium soy sauce 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger 1 teaspoon dark sesame oil 1 clove garlic, minced 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes

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1. Place sesame seeds in small nonstick skillet. Cook and stir over medium heat until lightly browned and toasted, about 5 minutes. Cool completely.

 

2. Crush sesame seeds, using mortar and pestle or wooden spoon; transfer to small bowl.

 

3. Add orange juice, rice wine, soy sauce, sesame oil, ginger, sugar, garlic and red pepper flakes. Blend well.

 

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© Publications International, Ltd. Nutrients per Serving (1 cup (without garnish)) Calories 194 Calories from Fat 19 % Total Fat 4 g Saturated Fat 1 g Cholesterol 29 mg Carbohydrate 24 g Fiber 1 g Protein 13 g Sodium 668 mg

 

 

 

Kimchi- Free if you use Splenda

Korean Cabbage Kimchi

 

 

The favorite kimchi vegetable is Chinese (or Napa) cabbage. The Koreans ferment it in enormous quantities. They then pack the kimchi into huge earthenware jars, bury the jars in the ground up to the neck, and cover the lids with straw until the kimchi is needed. Kimchi almost always includes hot pepper, usually dried and either ground or crushed into flakes. Because the ground dried hot pepper sold in Korean markets is generally fairly mild, Koreans can use generous quantities. Some of the Mexican (and New Mexican) ground peppers now sold in supermarkets are comparable. If you can't find ground pepper with a moderate heat level, you might combine sweet paprika and cayenne to suit your taste.

 

3 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon pickling salt 6 cups water

2 lbs. Chinese (Napa) cabbage, cut into 2-inch squares

6 scallions, cut into 2-inch lengths, then slivered

1 1/2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger

2 tablespoons Korean ground dried hot pepper (or other mildly hot ground red pepper)

1 teaspoon sugar

Makes about 1 1/2 Quarts

 

1. Dissolve the 3 tablespoons salt in the water. Put the cabbage into a large bowl, a crock, or a nonreactive pot, and pour the brine over it. Weight the cabbage down with a plate. Let the cabbage stand for 12 hours.

 

2. Drain the cabbage, reserving the brine. Mix the cabbage with the remaining ingredients, including the 1 teaspoon salt. Pack the mixture into a 2-quart jar. Pour enough of the reserved brine over the cabbage to cover it. Push a freezer bag into the mouth of the jar, and pour the remaining brine into the bag. Seal the bag. Let the kimchi ferment in a cool place, at a temperature no higher than 68° F, for 3 to 6 days,until the kimchi is as sour as you like.

 

3. Remove the brine bag, and cap the jar tightly. Store the kimchi in the refrigerator, where it will keep for months.

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Is anyone else here a big fan of Korean food? I think I could eat it everyday! :headover:

 

My favorite is Bi-bim-bob, but I've never really had anything at a Korean restaurant that I didn't like. They have the most wonderful little array of side dishes -- including soy bean sprouts which are fantastic (MUCH better than mung bean sprouts). I really wish sesame oil was one of the "healthy" oils so that I could use it every day!

Yes, I'm a big fan, especially being that I'm 1/2 Korean and my mom was very much into authentic Korean cooking. I can remember as early as age four eating kimchee with my mom. My siblings never would eat it, but my mother said I always liked it, even when she gave it to me younger than four! lol! I also agree that soy bean sprouts are much more delicious. :)

 

There is a nice book called Growing Up in a Korean Kitchen that has wonderful recipes in it. I have been able to get some recipes from it that very much resemble my mother's cooking. She never used a recipe and I never learned exactly how to make some things from her while I had the chance. Anyhow, here is a sample recipe from the book and my favorite way to eat spinach:

 

http://www.globalgourmet.com/food/special/2001/korean/spinach.html

 

I use less sesame oil when I make it and after toasting the sesame seeds, I crush them up slightly with a mortar and pestle to bring out even more flavour. That was something my mother always did and when I'd help out in the kitchen it was always my job to crush the seeds. :)

 

I hope you'll try the recipe! :)


Jayne

---

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Thanks, reminds.! I love spinach namul -- I have a couple of recipes, but the one at my local Korean restaurant always tastes better. I'll try this one and see how I like it. I'm dismayed to find yet another cookbook -- I already have 3 Korean cookbooks, but who knows, I may go for it -- especially if it's a good one! (My two favorites are Dok Suni by Jennie Kwak, and the one by Kim Millon).


189.8 :bcb_yuck: /140/140 /pg135

Maintaining since 5/18/06 :bcbkickbu

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I love kimchi, but I try not to eat it (or eat much of it) the day before or the day of WI -- it seems to have a lot of sodium in it and I then retain water and weigh heavier. I found this out the hard way!


189.8 :bcb_yuck: /140/140 /pg135

Maintaining since 5/18/06 :bcbkickbu

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I love Korean food as well. There is a delicious blend of soy sauce, ginger and garlic that makes any dish delicious. Here is one that received a blue ribbon in the low carb category at NYS Fair.

Korean Beef and Mushrooms

 

1 1/2 lb. boneless sirloin steak

1/3 cup soy sauce

1/3 cup sesame seeds

¼ - ½ t. crushed red pepper

4 cloves garlic

2 lb. fresh mushrooms

1 t. grated fresh ginger

1 cup sliced scallions

2 T sherry

8 tsp. Canola oil

fresh chives

chopped parsley

 

 

 

1.Cut steak into thin slices on diagonal.

2.Pound until thin.

3.Mix together the sesame seeds, garlic, sherry, ginger, soy sauce and red pepper.

4.Stir into the beef with wooden spoon pressing well with the back of the spoon.

5.Heat the oil and stir fry drained meat for one minute.

6.Remove meat and put aside.

7.Add the sliced mushrooms and scallions and cook over a high heat until cooked.

8.Return meat to the pan and stir through.

9.Remove with slotted spoon and plate..

10.Garnish with freshly chopped chives and parsley. Serves 4

 

Blue ribbon 2006 (Low Carb) appearance 12/12; texture 12/12; flavor 14/16

 


marge

 

SW: 206

GW: 146

CW: 166. 8:bcb_march

40#: 2/5; 45# 4/1; 50# 4/29

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