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protein question

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I didn't have the energy to surf this one out--and knew my buddies here would have the answer--probably memorized!!

 

HOW MANY GRAMS OF PROTEIN DO YOU NEED TO EAT EACH DAY?

 

Thanks for the help, Kathy


Kathy<br />I will succeed this time! (#4--I think)<br />SW 227.8 3/20/03<br />CW 175.2 5/28/04<br />GW 158 Sept 2004!!!<br />1st 10% 8/8/03 (-23.6)<br />2nd 10% 1/8/04 (-43.0)

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I believe it is around 30 grams.


Maureen

235/186.2/155

Made Goal 1/26/05:crazy:

Made Lifetime 3/9/05:headover:

 

Getting healthy is hard but NOT impossible!!!:)

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Guest imported_Kelly_S

Protein does not build muscle! Excess protein is converted to fat, not muscle, and the by-product of broken-down protein -- urea --

must be excreted in the urine. hence too much protein can lead to increased urination and dehydration. Most proteins -- hamburger,

cheese, and eggs -- also tend to be high in fat and can (not always but can) increase the chance of long-term healthy problems like

heart disease and cancer.

 

Athletes require more protein than their sedentary counterparts because it is needed to repair war and tear the well-trained muscles

undergo during a workout.

 

The average person needs about .8 grams of protein per kilogram or .4 grams of protein per pound.

 

Protein powders do not give an extra edge in building muscles -- muscles grow by being used or trained with resistance exercises like

weight training.

 

Filling up to too much protein is easy to do when taking or using protein supplements and the excess will be converted to fat. Amino

acid supplements or enzyme pills are no better. The are broken down in the digestive tract and absorbed similarly to protein. Since

amino acids compete for carriers to be absorbed into the blood, overdoing one type of amino acids can lead to problems longer term by

causing a deficiency in absorption of other amino acids.

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Thanks for the responses. I don't think I'm getting enough protein. I'm not a meat eater, so I'm going to have to start counting up to see where I'm at.


Kathy<br />I will succeed this time! (#4--I think)<br />SW 227.8 3/20/03<br />CW 175.2 5/28/04<br />GW 158 Sept 2004!!!<br />1st 10% 8/8/03 (-23.6)<br />2nd 10% 1/8/04 (-43.0)

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Guest p.c.

I'm not a meat eater, either, and I was worried about the protein issue. So I decided to count up my protein grams for a couple of weeks, and I was pleasantly surprised that I am getting plenty. If we are not going to eat meat, we have to be responsible in what we do eat so that we nourish our bodies. We can not just eat carbs and free veggies. I get my protein from milk and Kashi cereal in the morning, yogurt and legumes or peanut butter at lunch, cottage cheese or soy crisps as snack, and again legumes, tofu, cheese for dinner. Go ahead and see what you are getting, and then plan out next week's meals and make it happen!

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I seem to remember that a female adult needs about 70 gm per day....


Donna

SW 310

GOAL 12/4/07

Proud to a Vegan WW.

"Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." Michael Pollan

"Well, it seems to be working for me." Dr Michael Culmer

"Nuts are in hard shells for reasons." Dr John McDougall

"The salad IS the main course." Dr Joel Fuhrman

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Guest DuneRaiderette

just a question, but wont excess anything be turned to fat? as long as you are taking in more calories than you are burning, you are gonna build fat. (sorry, i have been weight lifting, and researching nutrition).

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Guest imported_Kelly_S

Yes it doesn't matter if it is excess CARBS or FAT or PROTEIN the excess calories are turned to fat and stored for later use.

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Guest judyo53

Great topic. Made me have to do some research & here's a good article which really explains things based on normal lifestyle & a lifestyle that uses a lot of endurance exercises:

 

How Much Protein Do You Really Need?

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Guest imported_Kelly_S

Gee that article states what I posted above.

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Guest judyo53

Kelly,

 

Well, yes & no. I took from the article that you need .45 to 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight. He stated many studies suggest .7 per pound. It also stated that in his study he didn't find an excess amount to be dangerous & felt even 2.8 grams per pound was safe with no harmful effects. That's a lot of protein!

 

Of course, you still have to figure out where anything like protein intake or carbs fall into you daily points allotment. But I'm glad this subject was brought up since I learned something new today.

 

Even though I was successful for over 3 yrs. on the Carboydrate Addict's Diet (about 5 yrs. ago), I got tired of the regime. But I never really read (or didn't remember) how much protein we really need or what is safe.

 

It's a great subject since WW is finally accepting people eating a low carb way within the points system.

 

[ March 19, 2004, 11:55 AM: Message edited by: judyo53 ]

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I always wondered how much we really needed, but my reading of that article seemed to indicate it was for people who did a lot of weight lifting or other strenth training exercises. I would guess that is the high range and if you don't do so much you need the low range. Maybe I was reading the article wrong. Seems like my consumption of 169 grams of protien a day would be excessive for my lifestyle.


Grace

:kickbutt:

 

Back to WW for Good 8/6/2010

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Guest imported_Kelly_S
Originally posted by Kelly_S:

The average person needs about .8 grams of protein per kilogram or .4 grams of protein per pound.

This is directly from a text book for nutritionists and registered dieticians.

 

[ March 21, 2004, 08:58 AM: Message edited by: Kelly_S ]

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Guest judyo53

Lawdawg,

 

Yes, he was giving a range of protein use/needs & did say that the more of whatever type of activity he was talking about (don't have the article up), the more protein needed for that type of person.

 

My daily average over the past week was 77.5 grams of protein daily. That's a bit higher than the low avg. recommended of .4 per lb. But now I don't have to worry that it's dangerous at that level.

 

However, last week I was trying to eat higher protein than normal. So I'll have to check this week's intake just to see how low it really goes.

 

[ March 21, 2004, 03:47 PM: Message edited by: judyo53 ]

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