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Heart rate ???

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Tonight I googled "heart rate calculator" to find out my fat buring range and I came up with 2 different ones...94-138 and 112-159. What if I go over these numbers? When I do my t/m workouts I have noticed I will be over the 159 by quite a bit sometimes, is this ok? What is best for burning the most fat? Any advice would be great.


Started WW: March 27, 2006

 

Starting Weight/Current Weight/Goal Weight

225/215/200

 

I WILL get there!!!

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Hi!!

 

Don't worry, you will not fall down if you exceed your heart rate intervals!! :bcb_wink3

 

First, heart rate intervals, max heart rate etc is highly personal.

 

About "fat burning range". This is the range where the largest percentage of energy used comes from fat. This happens at low intesities. Say that you exercise for 30 minutes at low intensity. You then earn X APs. A large amount of those comes from fat. However, if you exercise for 30 minutes at a higher intensity, you will earn MORE APs (Say Y, and Y>X), although a smaller percentage comes from fat. Am I making sense? It might still add up to the same 10ths of grams of fat!

 

My opinion is that it is better to exercise at a higher intensity if you can, because that will also build stamina. As long as you are not over exerting yourself.

 

I'm sure Jennifer can explain it better...

 

/H


*****************************

HW/Restart 2017-09-18/CW/GW

250/192/194/157

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About "fat burning range"....However, if you exercise for 30 minutes at a higher intensity, you will earn MORE APs (Say Y, and Y>X), although a smaller percentage comes from fat. Am I making sense? It might still add up to the same 10ths of grams of fat!

 

My opinion is that it is better to exercise at a higher intensity if you can, because that will also build stamina. As long as you are not over exerting yourself.

 

I'm sure Jennifer can explain it better...

 

/H

I dunno...you did a pretty good job, Hanna! But of course I have to put in my .02. Here's the thing...when you work out at higher intensities, you BURN MORE CALORIES. So, maybe your PERCENTAGE of fat burned is lower, but YOU STILL BURN MORE FAT CALORIES IN TOTAL. And, as you pointed out, you get the benefit of "tuning" your C/V system (which doesn't occur at low-intensities).

 

I, too, don't put too much stock in actual numbers on HR monitors. More important (and probably more reliable) is your own "perceived exertion," which, interestingly enough, is what WW uses as the guide for determing APs. If you feel you are working hard, then you are. If you feel you are about to pass out, then, by all means, SLOW down - even if your monitor is showing low numbers.

 

Trust how you feel and you'll be fine. (Geez, that sounded very Star-Wars, didn't it?)

 

- Jennifer


ACE-certified Personal Trainer

& WW Lifetime Member

 

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Here's a good article that explains it well

 

Your Target Heart Rate Zone

Do you exercise because you want to lose weight? If so, you probably know that cardio exercise is a key factor in helping you lose weight. Many people are warned to stay within their 'fat burning' zone for the best results, but do you really burn more fat if you work at lower intensities? Is it the most effective way to help you lose weight?

 

The Ugly Truth

 

The body does burn a higher percentage of calories from fat in the 'fat burning zone' or at lower intensities. But, at higher intensities, you burn a greater number of overall calories which is what you should be concerned about when trying to lose weight. The chart below details the fat calories expended by a 130-pound woman during cardio exercise:

 

Low Intensity - 60-65% MHR High Intensity - 80-85% MHR

Total Calories expended per min. 4.86 .............. 6.86

Fat Calories expended per min. 2.43 .................2.7

Total Calories expended in 30 min. 146...............206

Total Fat calories expended in 30 min. 73 ...........82

Percentage of fat calories burned 50%................39.85%

 

 

From The 24/5 Complete Personal Training Manual, 24 Hour Fitness, 2000

 

In this example, the woman burns more total calories and more fat calories at a higher intensity. This isn't to say that low intensity exercise doesn't have it's place. In fact, endurance workouts should be a staple of a complete fitness program along with shorter, higher intensity workouts or even interval workouts which are a great way to burn calories and build endurance. To figure out your own intensity levels, start by calculating your target heart rate zone.

 

What is Your Target Heart Rate?

 

In order to figure out which zone you're in, you first need to figure out what your own target heart rate is. You can do this by using the Karvonen Formula. You can also use any number of target heart rate calculators to get your heart rate zone, but many of them do not incorporate your resting heart rate (which makes it a bit more accurate).

 

Below is an example of the Karvonen formula for a 23 year old person with a resting heart rate of 65 beats per minute (*to get your resting heart rate, take your pulse for one full minute.):

 

220 - 23 (age) = 197

197 - 65 (resting heart rate) = 132

132 * 65% (low end of heart rate) OR 85% (high end) = 85.8 OR 112.2

85.8 + 65 (resting heart rate) = 150 112.2 + 65 (rhr) = 177

The target heart rate zone for this person would be 150 to 177


Starting over after baby #2.

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stormlady/

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A calorie, is a calorie, is a calorie! Yes, this silly fat burning zone is absolutely a way to get us to exercise at lower levels to keep us happy. Nobody likes pain and huffing and puffing away. So, what the ingenious people at the treadmill companies and the precor companies have devised works perfectly for those who really have no clue about exercise physiology.

 

No matter how you slice it, here are the facts on calories:

 

1 gram of fat = 9 calories

1 gram of carbohydrates= 4 calories

1 gram of protein = 4 calories

 

Plain and simple math, the harder you breath, the more oxygen you are consuming, the more calories that you are burning. So, if you are skipping away on your little precor machine at a very low level you will be burning very few calories. If you step up your intensity, you will increase your caloric expenditure and since fat calories are higher than carbohydrate calories, I would think you would want to exercise at a higher intensity to burn off those fat cals.

 

Oh, and just as an FYI, those caloric expenditures on those machines are 'hyped up' more than what they really should be. Especially on the Precor machines. It's a psychology thing that these companies play with, otherwise, nobody would buy their machine. Technically, these exercise scientists aren't lying to us abou where the fat burning zone lies, what they choose not to tell you is that if you stay in that fat burning zone, you won't be burning many calories, and really since a fat calorie is more than a carb calorie, you will not be burning as much in the end.

 

Exercise science is a very tricky field of thought. There are a lot of contradictions that follow each month with new trials and tests they come out with. But calories just don't change.


Julie S. Rossi

 

Physician Assistant Student -Hofstra University, NY

MA in Exercise Physiology - Adelphi University, NY

BA in Philosophy, Politics, and Law - Binghamton University, NY

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Current weight - 110 lbs

Weight to Loose - 10 lbs

Height- 4'11"

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Yes, as the above poster recommended. The Karvonen method is really the very best target heart rate calculations out there. Although, it can get difficult if you do not know your resting heart rate. Most normal heart rate target is approx. 70 bpm. Although it can be less if you are trained.

 

Also, do not just go by target heart rate. Especially on those treadmill machines, and/or precor's. I am 29 years old, my maximum heart rate should be 181. I can get my heart rate up to 196 running at 7.6 mph (and if I am doing a sprinting run, my HR can get up to 204) with no problem and sustain that speed and heart rate. Why? I am trained. I have been running for years and my body and heart are accustomed to such intensities.

 

So, take the whole target heart rate with a grain of salt. And like another poster suggested, go at a pace where you feel your intensity. Listen to your breathing, your body, and your pace.


Julie S. Rossi

 

Physician Assistant Student -Hofstra University, NY

MA in Exercise Physiology - Adelphi University, NY

BA in Philosophy, Politics, and Law - Binghamton University, NY

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Current weight - 110 lbs

Weight to Loose - 10 lbs

Height- 4'11"

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