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Guest momof2girls

working out...intensity level....heartrate

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Guest momof2girls

When you workout do you measure the intensity level? Do you just go full on and push it to the max for as long as you can? OR do you check your heartrate periodically and either slow down or speed up to keep it in the desired intensity?

 

How long do you try to keep your heartrate at the desired beats per minute?

 

I ask because my physio therepist wants me to aim for 20 minutes 3X's per week at a heart rate of 120. For me my heart rate goes up so fast that it doesn't take much to make it to 120. I feel like I am hardly doing anything, and yet he assures me that it is better to go for longer at a slower pace then to go hard for less time. What do you think?

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I use a heart rate moniter so that I can stay in my desired range. I will look at it periodically and either speed up or slow down according to what my heart rate is. I try to have 30-45 min in my desired intesity range. I have heard that you don't start to really burn fat until 20-30 min into the workout. You can also figure out your target heart rate range: here as so links to two sites because there are two ways to calculate your target heart rate.

http://www.exrx.net/Calculators/TargetHeartRate.html

http://www.changingshape.com/resources/calculators/targetheartratecalculator.asp

 

Resting Heart rate if you don't know is your heart rate you just wake up.

 

Laura


Laura (·Î¶ó )

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Laura's Weight loss Journey

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Guest judyo53

My reply is in your other thread.

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Guest girlinmotion

I believe it really depends on what your exercising goals are. The overall health benefit comes from being active, hence the experts say you certainly don't have to go crazy and train really hard just to be healthy. Overall, from what I've read, I think everyone should start by finding some activities they like that moderately raises their heart rate and do them at least 3-4 times a week for 30 minutes.

 

This will provide lots of good things, increased energy, decreased stress, and disease prevention. However, putting in more effort above and beyond this minimum will have more rewards (assuming you don't have any medical reason to take it easy). If you work harder you will build more cardiovascular efficiency, muscle,and endurance etc. You will also burn more calories (earn more APs).

 

Since my goal is to be constantly increasing my fitness both in terms of cardiovascular and endurance, I tend to use my heart rate and perceived exertion to ensure I'm always pushing myself a bit. I do this because it motivates me to workout, because I'm always achieving something as I improve. So I run farther. Or I try to run the same distance faster. Or I add sprinting intervals etc.

 

As for your question about going hard throughout your workout. I know I can't run all out from start to end. I use the Running Room's philosophy of working hard for 10 minutes than backing off for 1 minute. They actually seem to have proven that this improves overall speed for distance runners (marathoners use this principle). That little rest allows just enough muscle/heartrate recuperation that you can more than make up for your lost time.In addition, that 1 minute break reminds me to drink my water etc.

 

So if you want a little addition to your workout, add some tougher intervals like hills or sprints to your walk or run.See if you like it. If not, go back to what you were doing. Either way, the big challenge is to get out there and enjoy moving your body regularly!

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[ April 14, 2004, 12:21 PM: Message edited by: girlinmotion ]

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120 Hr is good for maintaining your overall health but will not really improve your cardiovasular system. If you go at that HR you need to go for a longer period of time to get the benefits however that being said, I do not know your current level of fitness. I would stick with what your Dr. has said and when you find that it takes longer or a harder intensity to increase your HR then talk to your Dr. again about where to go from there. The more you exercise the better you will get believe me. If you are able to walk for 5-7 days it is better than 3 days and you will see faster improvements but do not push yourself too hard too fast or you will just injure yourself and set yourself back.


Shayla Girvan<br />HW/SW/CW/GW<br />327/286/280/165<br /><br /><a

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