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Peg541

Amazing article

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http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/01/magazine/tara-parker-pope-fat-trap.html?_r=1-gezondheidref=health

 

Talks about those who have lost weight and how our bodies FIGHT US to put it back on. Very interesting and life changing.

 

But in now way defeating. Just shows how much work we have to do to keep it off. Much the same work as we did to lose it. Commitment is the key I think. Interesting all the same.


 

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Amazing. Depressing yet it explains a lot. I want to beat the odds, like this woman.

 

She has also come to accept that she can never stop being “hypervigilant” about what she eats. “Everything has to change,” she says. “I’ve been up and down the scale so many times, always thinking I can go back to ‘normal,’ but I had to establish a new normal.


Dandy

SW:340/CW:183.2/GW:130

It's not enough to want it, you have to want it enough.

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I think this is all key to what I tell people at meetings, when they ask me about being at lifetime so long - it NEVER stops. You've never "made it." Everyday is like the first day of being OP. You still have to make good choices. You still have to use portion control. You still have to track. You still need to weigh in. It never stops. And, if you do stop it, you will gain the weight back.

 

But, I would rather do all that than be fat again. So, I keep doing it.

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I think this is all key to what I tell people at meetings, when they ask me about being at lifetime so long - it NEVER stops. You've never "made it." Everyday is like the first day of being OP. You still have to make good choices. You still have to use portion control. You still have to track. You still need to weigh in. It never stops. And, if you do stop it, you will gain the weight back.

 

But, I would rather do all that than be fat again. So, I keep doing it.

 

I Like that Every day is like the first day of being OP. I am going to use that. Good one really. Thanks.

Yes this article is amazing.


 

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She has also come to accept that she can never stop being “hypervigilant” about what she eats. “Everything has to change,” she says. “I’ve been up and down the scale so many times, always thinking I can go back to ‘normal,’ but I had to establish a new normal.

 

This article was interesting.

 

For myself, I totally agree with the above statement. I must be hyper vigilant to maintain. I have to be focused on what I eat everyday. I takes some work and planning to lose weight and keep weight off. But I was also very focused on food when I heavy. Thinking I shouldn't eat that, I should cook like that, I shouldn't buy that, I am too fat to clothes shop, I will start eating right tomorrow, Monday I will start exercising, you get the picture. I was focused on food and my obesity. Ouch, I think that's the first time I called myself obese. I like chubby better.

 

For me, whether fat or thin, I focus on food. I hated how I looked, how I ate, and how I felt about myself. I wasn't in a healthy state mentally or physically. I feel successful weight loss people get a rap for being "hyper vigilant" on their focus on food. I have to be, if I am not, I will be 190 again.

 

I can be hyper vigilant the rest of my life or I can be unhappy, unhealthy, the rest of my life. I am proud to be hyper vigilant.:bcb_smile


Trudie

HW: 195.6/SW: 195.6

CW: 133 PGW: 138 WWGW: 155

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To me, this was the most important item from the feature:

 

The National Weight Control Registry tracks 10,000 people who have lost weight and have kept it off. “We set it up in response to comments that nobody ever succeeds at weight loss,” says Rena Wing, a professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University’s Alpert Medical School, who helped create the registry with James O. Hill, director of the Center for Human Nutrition at the University of Colorado at Denver. “We had two goals: to prove there were people who did, and to try to learn from them about what they do to achieve this long-term weight loss.” Anyone who has lost 30 pounds and kept it off for at least a year is eligible to join the study, though the average member has lost 70 pounds and remained at that weight for six years.

 

Wing says that she agrees that physiological changes probably do occur that make permanent weight loss difficult, but she says the larger problem is environmental, and that people struggle to keep weight off because they are surrounded by food, inundated with food messages and constantly presented with opportunities to eat. “We live in an environment with food cues all the time,” Wing says. “We’ve taught ourselves over the years that one of the ways to reward yourself is with food. It’s hard to change the environment and the behavior.”

 

There is no consistent pattern to how people in the registry lost weight — some did it on Weight Watchers, others with Jenny Craig, some by cutting carbs on the Atkins diet and a very small number lost weight through surgery. But their eating and exercise habits appear to reflect what researchers find in the lab: to lose weight and keep it off, a person must eat fewer calories and exercise far more than a person who maintains the same weight naturally. Registry members exercise about an hour or more each day — the average weight-loser puts in the equivalent of a four-mile daily walk, seven days a week. They get on a scale every day in order to keep their weight within a narrow range. They eat breakfast regularly. Most watch less than half as much television as the overall population. They eat the same foods and in the same patterns consistently each day and don’t “cheat” on weekends or holidays. They also appear to eat less than most people, with estimates ranging from 50 to 300 fewer daily calories.

 

And, I share as I have my National Weight Control Registry one-year follow-up survey in front of me...needed to be completed. Here's a link to what they share about people who lost weight and how they kept it off: http://www.nwcr.ws/Research/default.htm

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