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cybergranny

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  1. MARCH: EXOTIC WINTER FRUIT EXOTIC WINTER FRUIT! This is also available as a print-friendly Adobe Acrobat document* (PDF - 226K) Exotic fruits are becoming more available throughout the year in the United States. Many of the fruits described below are grown in the Southern Hemisphere, where our winter is their summer. Importing fruits from countries such as New Zealand allows Americans the opportunity to try new fruits all year round. Tamarillo The tamarillo is egg-shaped and is pointed at both ends with a green stem. The skin is tough and bitter and may be red, purple, amber, or golden yellow in color. The outer layer of apricot-colored flesh is slightly firm and the inside is filled with dark edible seeds that are slightly harder than those of a tomato. The flesh is tangy and tart, but flavorful. Tamarillos are native to South America, but most tamarillos sold in the United States are imported from New Zealand. This fruit is popular in South and Central America, the Caribbean, parts of Asia, and Australia. It is also commonly called a tree tomato. Selection Select fruit that is firm, unblemished and is heavy for its size. When ripe, tamarillos should be fragrant and should yield slightly to gentle pressure. Tamarillos are available from May to October in specialty stores and some supermarkets. They can occasionally be found out of season. Storage Tamarillos may be ripened at room temperature, then stored in the refrigerator or eaten once they are ripe. They last up to ten days in the refrigerator if wrapped in a plastic. Tamarillos may also be frozen if they are peeled and wrapped individually. Preparation Tamarillos should be peeled before eating or cooking. Blanching in boiling water for 2 to 3 minutes is often the easiest way to remove the skin if the fruit is not ripe. They are often eaten raw, when ripe. Dip in frozen orange juice concentrate to sweeten the fruit and add to fruit or vegetable salads. Tamarilos are also often made into jams, chutneys and relishes. Feijoa The feijoa is also an egg-shaped fruit with a thin lime-green skin. The flesh inside is cream-colored and encases a jelly-like center. The texture is gritty, close to that of a pear. The flesh tastes like a combination of several other fruits, usually described as pineapple, guava, and strawberry. Some people report a taste similar to that of a quince or lemon. Feijoa is native to South America, but is now commercially grown in New Zealand and California. It is also commonly called a pineapple guava. Selection Select fruit that is fragrant and gives slightly to gentle pressure. Ripe feijoas are delicate, so take caution not to bruise the fruit. Imported feijoas are available from late March to June; while domestic ones reach the market in the fall. Feijoas are gaining in popularity and are becoming easier to find in supermarkets. They are already easy to find in specialty markets and can often be ordered out-of-season through several online merchants. Storage Ripe feijoas may be refrigerated, but they don’t have to be. Ripen feijoas in a paper bag at room temperature; to ripen quicker add an apple to the bag. Ripe feijoas normally last about 3 to 5 days. Feijoas may be frozen, but only if peeled and cooked into a puree. Preparation Feijoas are most often eaten raw. The fruit is ripe when it is slightly soft and the jellied inner section is clear. The fruit is unripe when the jelly is white and is spoiled when the jelly is brown. Unfortunately, this test of ripeness may only be determined once the fruit is opened. Peel the fruit before preparing, as the skin is bitter. Red Banana Red bananas are smaller in size than a common banana and the peel is a deep red or purple. It has a creamy white to pink flesh, with a slight raspberry-banana flavor. The overall taste is similar to a common yellow banana. They are imported from Costa Rica and are a favorite in Central America. Selection Select firm bananas free from bruises or cracks in the peel and look for a deep purple color. This indicates the banana is ripe. If the color of the peel is lighter, the banana is not ripe. As with common yellow bananas, red bananas will ripen in a couple of days at room temperature. Red bananas are available year round at specialty markets and larger supermarkets. Storage Store bananas at room temperature, do not refrigerate. Turn bananas occasionally and store them in an uncovered location. Preparation Peel fruit prior to eating. Red bananas are used in similar ways as common yellow bananas. They are most frequently eaten whole raw or chopped and added to desserts or fruit salads. Red bananas are one of varieties commonly used for store bought dried bananas. Kiwano Melon Kiwano melon is an oval shaped fruit with horns on its peel. It has a bright orange and yellow skin with a pale yellow-green pulp inside. The flavor of the pulp is sweet and a bit tart with a flavor mix of bananas, lime and cucumber. Kiwano melon is native to southern and central Africa and is commonly known as an African horned melon. Most imported melons are now from New Zealand. California has began growing this melon, so a domestic product is available part of the year. Selection Select melons without any bruises or spots with a bright orange color. It is best to purchase a melon that has the horns intact, as damaged horns may be a sign of rough handling. Kiwano melons are available year round in specialty markets and supermarkets. Storage Unripe melons may be stored at room temperature for up to two weeks. Ripe melons will last about 3 to 4 days at room temperature. There is no need to refrigerate kiwano melon. Preparation There is no way to peel the skin off of the melon, so the fruit needs to be scooped out of the melon before using. The melon may be cut in half or into wedges to help extract the fruit pulp. The pulp may be eaten by itself, used as a topping for a sweet dessert or added to a fruit or green salad. The shell may be used as a serving dish once the pulp is removed, but the skin should not be eaten. Guava Guava is an oval shaped fruit that varies in size from a small egg to a medium apple. The thin skin may be yellow, red, purple or nearly black and the flesh ranges from a pale yellow to a bright red. Guava is sweet with a slight tart aftertaste. Its texture is firm; similar to an apple. Guava is native to South America, but is now commonly grown in California, Florida and Hawaii. It is also known as a Bangkok Apple or Guayaba. Selection Select fruit that gives to gentle pressure and is unblemished. Fresh guavas are often only available in the region near where they are grown, but may be ordered by mail. Canned guava products are available nationwide throughout the year in larger supermarkets. Storage Store ripe guavas in the refrigerator for up to a week. Green, unripe guavas should be stored at room temperature until ripe. Ripe guavas stored at room temperature will spoil quickly; normally within a couple of a days. Preparation The entire guava is edible. The rind and small seeds inside, along with the creamy flesh are often used in making jellies, preserves, and sauce. To be eaten raw, guava needs to be very ripe. Guava is typically sliced lengthwise into 5 or 6 slices and seeds discarded. Make Exotic Winter Fruit Part of Your 5 A Day Plan Add slices of tamarillo to your favorite sandwich for a tart twist. Add feijoa to your favorite lowfat smoothie for a taste of the tropics. Top your cereal with a red banana for a colorful change. Top your nonfat yogurt with kiwano melon for a tangy treat. Add guava to fruit salad for an added taste of sweetness. * Exported from MasterCook * Feijoa-Chicken Curry Recipe By : Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 Tablespoon olive oil 12 ounces chicken breasts -- skinned, boned, and cut into bite-sized chunks 5 1/2 cups carrots -- thinly sliced 1 cup bell pepper -- cubed 1 cup onion -- thinly sliced 1 clove garlic -- minced 4 feijoas -- peeled, halved lengthwise, and cut into slices (4 to 5) 1 Tbsp curry powder 1/4 tsp allspice 1/8 tsp pepper 1 Tbsp cornstarch 14 1/2 ounces chicken broth In a skillet, heat 2 tablespoons oil. Sauté chicken 3 minutes or until nearly done; remove from pan. Heat remaining oil in skillet; sauté carrots, bell pepper, onion, and garlic for 5 minutes or till carrots are nearly tender. Add chicken back to skillet with feijoas, curry powder, salt, allspice, and pepper. Stir cornstarch into chicken broth; pour into skillet with chicken mixture. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, 20 minutes. Serve with rice (optional, not included in the analysis). - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 303 Calories; 11g Fat (32.7% calories from fat); 20g Protein; 33g Carbohydrate; 7g Dietary Fiber; 44mg Cholesterol; 436mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 2 Lean Meat; 4 1/2 Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 1 Fat. NOTES : 6 points per serving. * Exported from MasterCook * Melon With Kiwano Melon Sauce Recipe By : Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 cup honeydew melon -- cut into chunks 1 cup watermelon -- cut into chunks 2 Kiwano melon Sauce: Pulp from 1 Kiwano Melon above 1/2 cup cantaloupe -- cut into chunks 2 tsp fresh mint -- chopped 1 tsp grated orange peel 1 tsp sugar Fresh mint sprigs (optional garnish) In a bowl, toss together honeydew and watermelon chunks. Halve both kiwano melons lengthwise. Scoop out interior of first kiwano melon and add to melon mixture. Scoop out interior of second horned melon and reserve for making sauce. Divide melon mixture evenly among the kiwano melon shells. For Sauce, Place reserved kiwano melon pulp in food processor or blender with ½ cup cantaloupe chunks, mint, orange peel, and sugar. Cover and process until smooth. Pour sauce over fruit in shells; garnish with mint sprigs. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 39 Calories; trace Fat (5.6% calories from fat); 1g Protein; 10g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 7mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 0 Other Carbohydrates. NOTES : Kiwano has only 25 calories per melon. The recipe is only one point per serving. * Exported from MasterCook * Red Bananas with Fruit Salsa Recipe By : Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 6 medium banana, red 3 Tbsp brown sugar -- packed 1 Tbsp lemon juice 1/4 tsp vanilla extract 1 Tbsp mint leaves -- crushed Fruit salsa: 3 large tangerines 1 large grapefruit 1 cup mango -- peeled and diced 2 Tbsp honey 3 Tbsp brewed orange tea 2 Tbsp walnuts -- chopped Peel the red bananas and split in half. Place in a flat glass dish cut side up. Combine the lime juice and vanilla, brushing the bananas with the mixture. Generously spoon the brown sugar on the bananas. Preheat broiler to high and place the sugar topped bananas under the broiler for 2-3 minutes until they are well caramelized. Remove from the broiler and cool for 1 minute before removing from the pan. For the fruit salsa, peel the clementines and grapefruit and cut between the membranes to separate the segments and remove the seeds. Place in a bowl and add the mango. Add the honey, tea and nuts, mix well and chill. To serve, divide the fruit salsa into small bowls. Place 2 halves of banana brulee in each bowl, and garnish with fresh mint. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 159 Calories; 2g Fat (13.0% calories from fat); 2g Protein; 36g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 5mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 0 Vegetable; 1 Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 1 Other Carbohydrates. NOTES : 3 points per serving. * Exported from MasterCook * Tamarillo Pear Chutney Recipe By : Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 cup apple juice 1/4 cup vinegar -- white wine 1/3 cup brown sugar -- packed 5 tamarillo -- peeled and chopped 2 pears -- firm, ripe, peeled and chopped 1 cup onion -- peeled and chopped 1/3 cup raisins 1 Tbsp ginger -- chopped 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon In a large saucepan, stir together juice, vinegar and brown sugar. Add remaining ingredients; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer, cook, stirring occasionally, about 20 minutes, or until fruit is very soft. Drain off most of the juice. Cool; store in covered container in refrigerator. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 122 Calories; trace Fat (2.7% calories from fat); 1g Protein; 31g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 7mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 1 1/2 Fruit; 0 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates. NOTES : 2 points per serving. * Exported from MasterCook * Tropical Fruit Salad with Guava Sauce Recipe By : Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 2 bananas -- sliced 1 pears -- ripe, sliced 4 kiwi fruit -- peeled and sliced 2 cups strawberries -- sliced 2 feijoa 2 Tbsp orange juice, frozen concentrate 1 guava -- ripe Combine all of the ingredients, except for the juice and guava, in a large serving bowl. Peel and slice the guava into quarters and place in a blender with the orange juice concentrate. Puree until smooth. Pour the mixture through a sieve to remove the seeds and pour over the fruit salad. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 123 Calories; 1g Fat (6.0% calories from fat); 2g Protein; 30g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 5mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Fruit; 0 Fat. NOTES : 2 points per serving.
  2. Here is the recipe that was already posted, pointed in mastercook: * Exported from MasterCook * Homemade Graham Crackers Recipe By : Serving Size : 48 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1/2 cup flour, all-purpose 1 1/4 cups flour, whole-grain wheat 1/2 cup rye flour -- light 1/2 cup sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 cup butter -- (1 stick) cut into pea-size bits, chilled 2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoon molasses 1/4 cup cold water 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Graham Crackers: In a food processor or the bowl of an electric mixer, mix together the flours, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon. Add the cold butter and mix or process until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the honey, molasses, water, and vanilla. Mix until the dough comes together in a ball. Between 2 sheets of waxed paper or plastic wrap, roll the dough 1/2-inch thick. Chill for 1 hour, until firm. Set a rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees F. Lightly flour the dough and roll 1/8-inch thick. With a sharp knife or cookie cutter, cut into 2-inch squares. Arrange the crackers on nonstick or parchment lined cookie sheets. With a fork, ***** several holes in each cracker. Bake for 15 minutes, until lightly browned at the edges. Remove from the oven and let cool in the pan. S(Internet Address): "http://www.healthdiscovery.net/forums/showthread.php?p=311693#post311 93" - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 49 Calories; 2g Fat (35.4% calories from fat); 1g Protein; 8g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber; 5mg Cholesterol; 66mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates. NOTES : 1 point per cracker.
  3. The three recipes that are first are very similar to a recipe my grandmother used to make that was easy and turned out wonderful. Unfortunately, it has been so many years since I made them that I don't remember how many they actually made. I thought that if you make any of these, you could let us know. I will try the cinnamon ones and see. I also think that we could use Splenda for part of the sugar and the recipes actually called for 'graham' flour OR whole wheat but I remember my grandma used whole grain wheat flour. If I can find graham flour, I will use that but the whole grain probably serves the same purpose. * Exported from MasterCook * Chocolate Graham Crackers Recipe By : Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 1/2 cups flour, all-purpose 1 cups flour, whole-grain wheat 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 cups cocoa 3/4 cups butter 1/3 cups granulated sugar 1/3 cups brown sugar 3 tablespoons honey 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 large egg For the sugar topping: 2 tablespoons butter -- melted 1/4 cup granulated sugar 1. Mix the dry ingredients together in a medium bowl. 2. With the paddle attachment of your electric mixer, beat the cold butter until it is soft. Add the sugars and continue beating. Then add the honey, extract and egg and beat until combined. 3. Add the dry ingredients to the mixer bowl and beat until a fairly firm dough is made. Wrap the dough in plastic and place it in the refrigerator to chill. 4. When the dough is firm enough to roll, lightly dust a countertop and a rolling pin and roll the dough to a scant 1/4-inch thick. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. 5. Use a ruler to mark 3-inch squares. Cut into squares with a sharp knife using the ruler as a straightedge. Use a thin metal spatula to scrape the crackers from the counter. Place them on a well-greased baking sheet with a margin of space to allow for spreading. Use a fork to pierce the crackers as shown. 6. For the topping, brush the tops of the crackers with melted butter. Sprinkle the sugar over the buttered tops. 7. Bake the crackers for ten minutes or until the edges just start to brown. Remove them to a wire rack to cool. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 3474 Calories; 173g Fat (43.4% calories from fat); 48g Protein; 460g Carbohydrate; 27g Dietary Fiber; 647mg Cholesterol; 3441mg Sodium. Exchanges: 16 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean Meat; 33 1/2 Fat; 14 1/2 Other Carbohydrates. * Exported from MasterCook * Cinnamon Graham Recipe By : Serving Size : 36 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 1/2 cups flour, all-purpose 1 1/4 cups flour, whole-grain wheat 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon cinnamon 3/4 cups butter 1/3 cups granulated sugar 1/4 cups brown sugar 1/4 cups honey 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 large egg For the sugar and cinnamon topping: 2 tablespoons butter -- melted 3 tablespoons granulated sugar 2 teaspoons cinnamon 1. Mix the dry ingredients together in a medium bowl. 2. With the paddle attachment of your electric mixer, beat the cold butter until it is soft. Add the sugars and continue beating. Then add the honey, extract and egg and beat until combined. 3. Add the dry ingredients to the mixer bowl and beat until a fairly firm dough is made. Wrap the dough in plastic and place it in the refrigerator to chill. 4. When the dough is firm enough to roll, lightly dust a countertop and a rolling pin and roll the dough to a scant 1/4-inch thick. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. 5. Use a ruler to mark 3-inch squares. Cut into squares with a sharp knife using the ruler as a straightedge. Use a thin metal spatula to scrape the crackers from the counter. Place them on a well-greased baking sheet with a margin of space to allow for spreading. Use a fork to pierce the crackers as shown. 6. For the topping, mix the cinnamon and sugar together in a bowl. Brush the tops of the crackers with melted butter. Sprinkle the cinnamon-sugar mixture over the buttered tops. 7. Bake the crackers for ten minutes or until the edges just start to brown. Remove them to a wire rack to cool. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 98 Calories; 5g Fat (42.6% calories from fat); 1g Protein; 13g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 18mg Cholesterol; 95mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates. * Exported from MasterCook * Honey Graham Crackers Recipe By : Serving Size : 36 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 1/2 cups flour, all-purpose 1 1/4 cups flour, whole-grain wheat 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 3/4 cups butter 1/3 cups granulated sugar 1/4 cups brown sugar 1/4 cups honey 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 large egg 1. Mix the dry ingredients together in a medium bowl. 2. With the paddle attachment of your electric mixer, beat the cold butter until it is soft. Add the sugars and continue beating. Then add the honey, extract and egg and beat until combined. 3. Add the dry ingredients to the mixer bowl and beat until a fairly firm dough is made. Wrap the dough in plastic and place it in the refrigerator to chill. 4. When the dough is firm enough to roll, lightly dust a countertop and a rolling pin and roll the dough to a scant 1/4-inch thick. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. 5. Use a ruler to mark 3-inch squares. Cut into squares with a sharp knife using the ruler as a straightedge. Use a thin metal spatula to scrape the crackers from the counter. Place them on a well-greased baking sheet with a margin of space to allow for spreading. Use a fork to pierce the crackers as shown. 6. Bake the crackers for ten minutes or until the edges just start to brown. Remove them to a wire rack to cool. These crackers are only lightly sweet. For a sweeter version, just before baking the crackers, brush the tops with melted butter. Sprinkle granulated sugar over the buttered tops. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 88 Calories; 4g Fat (41.2% calories from fat); 1g Protein; 12g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 16mg Cholesterol; 89mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates. Serving Ideas : Baker's note: Graham flour is a whole wheat flour with lots of fiber from the wheat hull left in. You can substitute your favorite whole wheat flour if you prefer. Different wheat flours will lend a little different texture to the crackers. NOTES : If you would like to serve something sweeter, sandwich two of these crackers with frosting. * Exported from MasterCook * Honey Graham Crackers II Recipe By : Serving Size : 36 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 cup flour, whole-grain wheat 1 cup flour, all-purpose 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. baking powder 1/4 cup margarine or butter 1/2 cup honey 1/4 cup milk Combine flours, salt, baking powder. Cut in butter or margarine until consistency of cornmeal. Stir in honey. Add milk to make a stiff dough. Roll out on floured surface to 1/4-in. thickness. Cut into squares. ***** with a fork. Brush with milk. Bake at 400º F. on baking sheet for 18 minutes or until golden brown. If rolled thicker, these crackers can be used as teething biscuits. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 51 Calories; 1g Fat (24.4% calories from fat); 1g Protein; 9g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 4mg Cholesterol; 87mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1/2 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.
  4. PLEASE DO! I hope some of that creativity of yours rubs off here in the Mess Hall!
  5. FEBRUARY EXOTIC VEGETABLES: EXOTIC VEGETABLES! These three exotic vegetables: calabaza squash, chayote squash, and bitter melon are all becoming more mainstream. All three are being found more and more in local supermarkets; there may soon be no need to go to a specialty market to try something new. Calabaza Squash Word to the WiseWhole calabaza may be difficult to slice. Slicing through the tough rind often calls for a heavy cleaver or a very sharp knife. If the squash resists slicing, remove the stem and place the knife or cleaver blade along the squash’s length. Gently tap the blade with a hammer until the squash falls open. Scoop out the seeds, peel and prepare! Calabaza is a type of pumpkin-like squash that is round in shape and varies in size. It can be as large as a watermelon or as small as a cantaloupe. The color of calabaza can also vary and may include greens, tans, reds and oranges. Some squash are all one color while other calabaza are multi-colored and may include all of colors listed above. This squash is popular in the Caribbean as well as Central and South America. It is also commonly called a West Indian Pumpkin. Selection Calabaza is often sold already chopped into chunks in many Latin markets. This is because of the difficulty many have in chopping the whole squash (see box below). Select pieces with a fresh, moist and unblemished flesh. Soft or wet spots means the squash is beginning to spoil. The color of the flesh should be a bright orange. Whole squash are more difficult to find, but if you find one, select one that still has the stem attached and is heavy for its size. You should avoid purchasing a squash with bruises, cuts, or soft spots. Calabaza is available year round. Storage Whole calabaza may be stored in a cool, dry space for up to 6 weeks. Cut calabaza should be wrapped tightly or placed in a covered container in the refrigerated for no more than one week. Preparation Calabaza has a sweet flavor and its texture is firm. This is similar to the taste and texture of more familiar varieties of squash, such as butternut or acorn. Calabaza may be substituted in recipes calling for those more common types of squash. Calabaza is most commonly baked, either cut in sections or in cubes. Its seeds may also be roasted in a similar way as pumpkin seeds. Simply place on a baking sheet coated in cooking spray until brown and crisp. Chayote Squash Chayote is a gourd-like squash that is about the size and shape of a very large pear. The skin is pale green and smooth with slight ridges that run lengthwise. Many compare the color to a light green apple. The flesh is white and there is one soft seed in the middle. Chayote is grown in several states including California, Florida, and Louisiana, but it is native to Latin America. Historically, this squash was one of the primary foods of the Aztecs and Mayas. Chayote is also called mirliton and the French call it christophene. Selection Select squash that are small, firm and unblemished; just as you would select a pear. Choose squash that is heavy for its size. Tender skin, skin that reacts to pressure, often means poor quality. Chayote is commonly found in supermarkets during peak season (December to March), but may be found in larger supermarkets and specialty markets throughout the year. Storage Refrigerate whole chayote in a plastic bag for up to one month. Cut chayote may be refrigerated in a covered container or tightly wrapped for 3 to 5 days. It is best to use chopped chayote immediately, as it can gather flavors from other foods stored in the refrigerator. Preparation Chayote has a bland-tasting flesh that may be used in several ways. It may be prepared in similar ways to other summer squash, such as zucchini, but may require peeling and a bit more seasoning. Chayote is most commonly used in side dishes, stews, and casseroles. It may also be sliced in half and baked. The soft seed is edible, but many choose to remove it. Bitter Melon Bitter melon is actually a member of the squash family and resembles a cucumber with bumpy skin. When first picked, a bitter melon is yellow-green, but as it ripens, it turns to a yellow-orange color. The inside of the melon is filled with fibrous seeds. Bitter melon is used mostly in Asian and Indian cooking. Other names for bitter melon include: foo qua, balsam pear, or bitter gourd. Selection Select firm, unblemished melons that are from 5 to 12 inches in length. Choose melons that are still green for a more bitter flavor and a yellow-orange melon for a milder taste. Bitter melons are available fresh from April to September in most Asian markets and can occasionally be found in larger supermarkets. Some markets are beginning to carry bitter melons year round. They may also be purchased canned or dried. Storage Store melon loose in a paper or plastic bag in the refrigerator for 3 to 5 days. Slice the melon immediately before use. Preparation Cut in half and discard the seeds and fibrous core. To reduce the bitterness, blanch in boiling water for 2 to 3 minutes. The skin is edible and the melon is not typically peeled. The seeds are also edible, unless very hard, and are included in some recipes. Bitter melon is commonly stuffed, curried or pickled. It can also be used in stir-fry’s and soups and may be steamed. Garlic or chili peppers are often added to recipes with bitter melon to offset the bitter taste. Make Exotic Vegetables Part of Your 5 A Day Plan Add cooked chayote to your green salad for a different flavor. Add calabaza to your vegetable soup for color and texture. Add bitter melon to your next stir-fry. Cook chayote with carrots for a blend of flavors. Calabaza makes a great addition to winter stew. * Exported from MasterCook * Caribbean Calabaza and Chayote Ratatouille Recipe By : Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 cup squash -- calabaza ,cubed 2 chayote squash -- diced 2 peppers -- Anaheim, diced 1/2 cup red bell pepper -- diced 2 cloves garlic -- diced 1 medium plantain -- green, sliced 1 cup onion -- chopped 2 Tbsp olive oil 1 tsp salt 1 cup orange juice 1 tsp cumin seed 1 tsp oregano -- ground 1 tsp black pepper Warm the olive oil in a large dutch oven. Add the onion and cook until translucent. Then add each of the vegetables at 2 minute intervals starting with the green plantains, calabaza, chayote, Anaheim chile and red pepper. Stir well without crushing any of the vegetables. Season with garlic, oregano, cumin, black pepper and salt. Moisten the mixture with the orange juice. Simmer for 5 minutes or until tender. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 140 Calories; 6g Fat (32.5% calories from fat); 2g Protein; 24g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 360mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1 1/2 Vegetable; 1 Fruit; 1 Fat. NOTES : 2 points per serving. * Exported from MasterCook * Chayote and Poblano Slaw Recipe By : Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1/2 cup pineapple juice 1 large cucumber -- halved lengthwise 1 large chayote squash -- peel, pitted and halved lengthwise 2 cups pineapple -- diced 4 peppers -- Poblano, roasted and peeled 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp olive oil In a small saucepan, simmer pineapple juice over low heat, until reduced to 2 tablespoons. Let cool to room temperature. Sauté chayote just until crisp, about 1 to 2 minutes. Thinly slice cucumber and the chile. Toss with pineapple. Whisk the remaining ingredients with the pineapple juice, and pour over vegetables, mix well. Serve immediately or refrigerate, covered up to 4 hours. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 70 Calories; 2g Fat (27.0% calories from fat); 1g Protein; 13g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 26mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Lean Meat; 1 Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 1/2 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates. NOTES : 1 point per serving. * Exported from MasterCook * Chayote Salad Recipe By : Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 1/2 cups chayote squash 3 cups spinach leaves 16 oz garbanzo beans -- cooked 1/2 cup red onion -- chopped 1/2 cup carrot -- chopped 2 Tbsp vinaigrette 2 ounces mozzarella cheese, part skim milk -- shredded Cook chayote in a small amount of boiling water for about l5 minutes, or till tender. Rinse pieces in cold water; peel, and remove seed. Cut into ½-inch chunks. In a large salad bowl, toss together spinach, chayote, garbanzo beans, and cheese. Top with nonfat vinaigrette - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 259 Calories; 7g Fat (23.2% calories from fat); 14g Protein; 38g Carbohydrate; 11g Dietary Fiber; 4mg Cholesterol; 63mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean Meat; 1/2 Vegetable; 1 Fat. NOTES : 5 points per serving.
  6. Hey, you figure out another thing to do and get it posted! Sorry that I got in front of you! I have been wanting to do this since the first of the year and am only just now getting to it. Seriously Jeanette, I would love it if you picked a subject and just ran with it!
  7. Make your own Italian seasoning spice mix. INGREDIENTS: 1/3 cup dried oregano leaves 1 Tbsp. garlic powder 2 tsp. onion salt 1/3 cup dried basil leaves 2 Tbsp. rosemary leaves, ground down to 1 tsp. 1/4 cup dried thyme leaves PREPARATION: Combine all ingredients and store in a tightly closed container. Store in a cool, dry place. ---------------------------------------------------- 1/4 cup dried basil 2 Tbsp. dried marjoram 2 Tbsp. dried oregano 2 Tbsp. dried corriander 2 Tbsp. dried thyme 2 Tbsp. dried rosemary 2 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. sugar Combine all ingredients. Store in an airtight container in a cool dark place for up to three months. ------------------------------------------------------- Italian Seasoning Mix 3 tablespoons dried basil 3 tablespoons dried oregano 3 tablespoons dried parsley 1 tablespoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried rosemary 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes mix all ingredients in a spice grinder. or put in a small bowl and crush with the back of a spoon. store in an airtight jar for up to 6 months. ------------------------------------------------------------------- Italian Seasoning 2 tablespoons dried basil 2 tablespoons dried marjoram 2 tablespoons dried oregano 2 tablespoons dried coriander leaf 2 tablespoons dried thyme 2 tablespoons dried rosemary 2 tablespoons dried savory 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes In the bowl of a food processor, combine all the ingredients. Process for 30 seconds until finely ground. Transfer to a tightly sealed container. Store in a cool dark place for up to 3 months. -------------------------------------------------------------- Italian Seasoning 1/3 cup dry crushed oregano 1/3 cup dry basil 2 tablespoons rosemary 1/4 cup each thyme, sage, and marjoram Combine all; store in jar. --------------------------------------------------------------- Now, any of these will do just fine. Personally, I use a blend very similar to the third one but I always add a teaspoon of fennel seed.
  8. First, if you are not a fish eater, don't start with salmon. It is a very strong tasting fish and some people think it is an aquired taste. You can still use this recipe, just use a milder flavored fish. Try mahi mahi, or orange roughy or snapper. Somthing that is thick and firm and WHITE fleshed. Cut it into serving sized pieces and follow the instructions as though you were cooking salmon. A George is perfect to cook fish in. There is no real time limit on how long to cook it. Just look at it and when there are nice brown grill marks in it, take a fork and poke it about 1/4 inch from any end and pull. If the fish flakes off and is white clear through, it is done. It's better if you don't overcook it. Good luck, fish is really very easy to fix.
  9. FEBRUARY: STAR FRUIT The star fruit or carambola is a tropical fruit that is gaining popularity in the United States. This fruit acquired its name from the five pointed star shape when cut across the middle of the fruit. It has a waxy, golden yellow to green color skin with a complicated flavor combination that includes plums, pineapples, and lemons. Star FruitServing size 125g Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 40 Calories from Fat 5Total Fat 0g0%Saturated Fat 0g0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Sodium 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 10g3% Dietary Fiber 3g12% Sugars 7gProtein 1gVitamin A15%Vitamin C45%Calcium0%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Originally from Sri Lanka and the Moluccas, and cultivated in Southeast Asia and Malaysia for several hundred years, this fruit also goes by many other names including: bilimbi, belimbing, Chinese star fruit, five-angled fruit and the star apple. Today, star fruit flourishes in south Florida and Hawaii because the fruit thrives on growing in a warm environment. Two types of star fruit are grown, tart and sweet. Tart varieties typically have narrowly spaced ribs, while sweet varieties tend to have thick, fleshy ribs. The tastes between the two are hardly distinguishable, as the tart variety still has some sweetness. This tropical fruit is readily available July through February. Star fruits are an excellent source of vitamin C, is low fat, and naturally sodium and cholesterol free. A small whole star fruit will provide approximately 2/3 cup sliced. Selection Select firm, shiny skinned, even colored fruit. Star fruits will ripen at room temperature and have lightly brown edges on the ribs when it’s ripe. Avoid purchasing star fruit with brown, shriveled ribs. This delicious fruit is also available dried. Storage Non-ripe star fruit should be turned often, until they are yellow in color and ripe with light brown ribs. Store ripe star fruits at room temperature for two to three days or unwashed, and refrigerated, in a plastic bag for up to one week. Preparation Star fruits are great to eat out of hand as these tropical delights do not need to be peeled or seeded before eating. Simply wash the fruit, remove any blemished areas, cut crosswise to get the star shape, and eat! Make Star Fruit Part of Your 5 A Day Plan Add to fruit salads. Use for tarts, preserves, chutney and stewed fruits. Garnish chicken, pork or fish dishes. Garnish beverages. Add to your fruit smoothies. * Exported from MasterCook * Broiled Star Fruit with Vanilla Frozen Yogurt Recipe By : Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 500 grams starfruit -- (4 fruits)trimmed and each sliced into 8 stars 2 Tbsp lemon juice -- fresh 2 Tbsp light brown sugar 2 cups frozen yogurt sf, ff -- vanilla Place a broiler rack 6 inches from source of heat. Preheat broiler. Arrange star fruit slices on a baking sheet and brush with lemon juice. Sprinkle with brown sugar. Broil until sugar bubbles and begins to darken, about 2 to 3 minutes. Meanwhile, scoop frozen yogurt into 4 dessert dishes. Top each serving with 4 star fruit slices. Serve immediately. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 73 Calories; trace Fat (4.6% calories from fat); 2g Protein; 17g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 1mg Cholesterol; 19mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Fruit; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates. NOTES : 1 point per serving. * Exported from MasterCook * Star Fruit Avocado Salad Recipe By : Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 2 cups lettuce leaves -- Romaine,torn 1 1/2 cups tomatoes -- about 2, sliced 1/2 cup onion -- red, sliced 1/2 cup avocado -- sliced 500 grams starfruit -- sliced 1 cup cucumber -- sliced 1 cup jicama slices 1/2 cup mushrooms -- sliced On each of four salad plates, arrange a bed of lettuce. Layer the remaining ingredients in the order listed. Drizzle with lemon vinaigrette or your favorite dressing. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 120 Calories; 4g Fat (24.5% calories from fat); 3g Protein; 22g Carbohydrate; 8g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 16mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 1/2 Fat. NOTES : 2 points per serving. NOTE THE USE OF JICAMA IN THIS RECIPE, JANUARY'S FRUIT! * Exported from MasterCook * Star Fruit Salad Recipe By : Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 2 starfruit 2 kiwi fruits 2 bananas 1 cup mango juice 1 cup vanilla yogurt, lowfat Peel kiwi and banana, cut into medium size pieces. Slice star fruit into ¼-inch thickness. Combine all fruits in bowl. Add nectar over mixture. Refrigerate for 3 hours. Top with vanilla yogurt. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 165 Calories; 1g Fat (7.3% calories from fat); 4g Protein; 37g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 3mg Cholesterol; 46mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Fruit; 0 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates. NOTES : 3 points per serving.
  10. Well, I bit the bullet and did potatoes for DH and DS to go with dinner today and I did zucchini for me. They thought the potatoes tasted like the hash browns you eat for breakfast. I am in LOVE with the zoodles though. I am not even a big fan of zucchini but I can sure see how people use it as a sub for pasta. I just gave a large skillet two spritzs with olive oil, put in the zucchini, sprinkled on garlic and lots of a pepper blend and a couple of spritzs on the top. I only sauteed them for two or three minutes. They were definitely al dente just like pasta and the taste was just great. Can't wait to try something else!
  11. Same as with the Fruit of the Month, I am going to play catch up here and start with January. JANUARY TUBERS: Root vegetables are a commonly neglected bunch, but have recently taken some spotlight with increased emergence of international cuisine. Each root has its own unique taste and nutritional value, so be daring and expand your taste buds! This month’s feature includes: Cassava (yucca root), Jicama, Sunchoke, Taro root, and Water chestnut. Varieties Yucca RootServing Size (52g) Amounts Per Serving % Daily Value Calories 80 Calories from Fat 0 Total Fat 0g0%Sodium 5mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 20g7% Dietary Fiber 1g4% Sugars 1gProtein 2gVitamin A0%Vitamin C20%Calcium0%Iron0%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Yucca Root Yucca (also known as manioc or cassava), is a white, starchy tropical vegetable that widely grown and consumed in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. In many countries, yucca is a dietary staple usually eaten boiled, steamed, and in flour form as thickeners or additional ingredients for noodles, cakes, and pastries. Yucca root has made a home growing in Florida since the late 1800s. Cassava is a bushy perennial that can grow as tall as 8 feet. The white interior of yucca is firmer than potatoes and has high starch content. Fresh yucca has thick, dark brown skin that resembles a tree's bark. Fresh yucca is available year round. Look for firm blemish free tubers. Store whole yucca as you would potatoes, in a cool, dark, dry place for up to one week. Peeled yucca covered with water and refrigerated or wrapped tightly and frozen for several months. Yucca can easily be substituted for potatoes in soups and stews and it contains a high amount of vitamin C and carbohydrates. It is also a good source of dietary fiber and contains approximately 120 calories per 1 cup serving. JicamaServing Size (60g) Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 25 Calories from Fat 0 Total Fat 0g0%Sodium 0mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 5g2% Dietary Fiber 3g12% Sugars1gProtein 0gVitamin A0%Vitamin C20%Calcium0%Iron2%*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Jicama Jicama is a relative of the potato family. It is a popular dietary staple in Latin America and widely grown in Mexico and Central America. There are many names for Jicama including: the Mexican potato, Mexican yam bean, ahipa, saa got, Chinese turnip, lo bok, and the Chinese potato. Jicama looks similar to a turnip or a large radish, and it can be used as an alternative to the water chestnut. Its skin is thin and can be gray, tan, or brown in color. Additionally, it has a short root and contains white flesh. The skin is typically peeled before eating it raw. Raw jicama tastes similar to a pear or apple. It also does not discolor when exposed to the open air for awhile. Because of this, raw jicama is often used as an accompaniment to raw vegetable platters. When jicama is used in cooking it tends to take on the flavors of the ingredients that it is being combined with. Therefore, jicama is a nice complement to various stir-fry dishes because it blends well with many vegetables and seasonings. Jicama is a very versatile vegetable that contains a high amount of vitamin C, is low in sodium, and has no fat. One adult serving of jicama, which is equal to approximately 1 cup of cubed jicama or 120 grams, also contains only 45 calories. Jicama is available year-round. When purchasing jicama, select tubers that are firm and have dry roots. Make sure that the jicama has an unblemished skin and that is not bruised. Once purchased, store jicama for up to two weeks in a plastic bag in your refrigerator. SunchokeServing Size 1 cup raw slices Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 110 Calories from Fat 0 Total Fat 0g0%Sodium 5mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 26g9% Dietary Fiber 2g10% Sugars 4gProtein 3gVitamin A0%Vitamin C10%Calcium2%Iron25%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Sunchoke A relative of the sunflower, this vegetable is native to America, not Jerusalem, and has no botanical relation to artichokes. In fact, these tubers are actually a member of the Sunflower family. The white flesh is nutty, sweet and crunchy like chestnuts when raw. Baked in their skins, they become more like potatoes with a mild taste of artichoke hearts. The Jerusalem artichoke is widely grown in gardens in Texas and is harvested in the fall for highest quality. Widely available in supermarkets, its peak period is September through January, but often continues through the early spring. Select firm sunchokes that are firm and free from mold and wrinkles. Sunchokes vary in color where their shades range from dark brown to light brown in color, similar to ginger. These tubers need be refrigerated, unwashed, in a plastic bag for up to 1 week for successful storage. Taro RootServing Size 1 cup raw slices (104g) Amounts Per Serving% Daily ValueCalories 110 Calories from Fat 0 Total Fat 0g0%Sodium 10mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 28g9% Dietary Fiber 4g17% Sugars 1gProtein 2gVitamin A0%Vitamin C8%Calcium4%Iron2%* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Taro Root The taro root, as with other tubers is recognized by other names. This tuber is also known as dasheen, eddo and kalo in many areas of the world including West Africa, Asia, Central America, South America and the Caribbean and Polynesian islands. This root is most well-known as the ingredient of the Hawaiian dish "poi," or mashed taro root. Taro root is a starchy vegetable that is commonly used in place of a potato. Its hairy outer coating on its surface is similar to a coconut. The hairy outer layer is always removed with caution since skin irritation can arise caused by the juices secreted by the taro root. It is recommended to use protective rubber gloves when handling this tuber. Taro root is toxic in its raw form so always cook it before eating. These tubers take on a nut-like flavor when cooked. Frying, baking, roasting, boiling, or steaming them as an accompaniment to meat dishes are all common uses. Soups and stews are other dishes that taro root suits well. Taro roots provide a good source of fiber and supply approximately 110 calories per adult serving. Select tubers that are firm, hairy, with no wrinkling. Store the roots for up to one week in a cool and dry location, making sure that the roots do not dry out. Water ChestnutServing Size (62g) Amounts Per Serving % Daily Value Calories 30 Calories from Fat 0 Total Fat 0g0%Sodium 5mg0%Cholesterol 0mg0%Total Carbohydrate 8g3% Dietary Fiber 3g12% Sugars 1gProtein 1gVitamin A0%Vitamin C0%Calcium0%Iron90%*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Water Chestnut The water chestnut, resembles a chestnut in color and shape, is also known as the Chinese water caltrop. This tuber is commonly associated with Chinese cooking, but is finding its way into other ethnic meals. Hailing from Southeast Asia, water chestnuts are actually roots of an aquatic plant that grows in freshwater ponds, marshes, lakes, and in slow-moving rivers and streams. These roots are commonly grown in Japan, Taiwan, China, Thailand, and sometimes in Australia. Water chestnut harvesting is laborious, making them somewhat expensive to purchase. Processed and canned water chestnuts widely found in most supermarkets. However, fresh water chestnuts, are more difficult to find, but are becoming more available. If you find fresh water chestnuts, select those that are firm with no signs of wrinkling. These will need to be peeled prior to eating and cooking. Stored fresh tubers need to be wrapped tightly in a plastic bag for up to one week. Canned, unopened water chestnuts will store indefinitely. Once opened, canned tubers will keep up to one week in a bowl of water. Be sure to change the water daily for the ‘freshest’ product. Make Tubers Part of Your 5 A Day Plan Add yucca with potatoes and other vegetables into beef, chicken, or vegetable-based soups and stews. Try eating jicama raw by including it into slaws or salads. Use jicama as a substitute for water chestnuts in all of your favorite recipes. Sunchokes make a delicious substitute in recipes that ask for water chestnuts or jicama. Add sliced sunchokes in marinated vegetable mixtures, or on an appetizer vegetable platter with dips. Add water chestnuts to your stir-fries, salads, or any meals where you need a crunchy consistency. * Exported from MasterCook * Chinese Chicken with Water Chestnuts Recipe By : Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 Tbsp dry sherry -- or chicken stock 3 Tbsp soy sauce, low sodium 1 tsp cornstarch 2 Tablespoons sesame oil 1 clove garlic -- crushed 3 Tbsp chives -- chopped 1 Tbsp ginger root -- slivered 1/2 lb chicken breast -- cut in thin strips 2 cups waterchestnuts -- peeled and sliced (canned is okay) 1 cup bamboo shoots -- sliced Mix sherry, soy sauce and cornstarch; set aside. Heat frying pan; add oil and heat thoroughly. Add garlic, chives, ginger, and bamboo shoots; stir-fry 1 minute. Add chicken to stir-fry and cook for 3 to 4 minutes or until light brown. Add water chestnuts and stir-fry 1 more minute. Add cornstarch mixture and stir for another minute or so. Serve immediately. Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 232 Calories; 11g Fat (43.4% calories from fat); 12g Protein; 21g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 29mg Cholesterol; 490mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 1 1/2 Lean Meat; 1 Vegetable; 1 1/2 Fat. NOTES : This recipe is 5 points per serving. * Exported from MasterCook * Jicama and Carrot Slaw Recipe By : Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 pound jicama -- 1 small (480 g), peeled and julienned 3/4 cup carrots -- cleaned and grated 1/4 cup scallion -- white part only, minced 3 tablespoons sour cream, light -- (45 ml) 3 tablespoons mayonnaise, imitation -- (45 ml) or light 2 tablespoons vinegar -- (30 ml), malt 1 clove garlic -- minced 1 1/2 cups lettuce leaf -- washed and crisped 1.Place the jicama, carrot, and scallion in a bowl. 2.In a small bowl, whisk together the sour cream, mayonnaise, vinegar, and garlic. Spoon onto the vegetables and toss. 3.To serve, place 2 lettuce pieces on each of 4 plates. Divide the vegetable mixture between the plates and serve. Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 71 Calories; 1g Fat (11.5% calories from fat); 2g Protein; 15g Carbohydrate; 6g Dietary Fiber; 6mg Cholesterol; 75mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1/2 Vegetable; 0 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates. NOTES : This recipe is one point per serving. * Exported from MasterCook * Jicama, Orange and Onion Salad Recipe By : Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 2 cups lettuce leaves -- torn 1 cup oranges -- peeled and thinly sliced, about 2 naval variety 2 cups onions -- thinly sliced, red variety 1 cup jicama -- peeled and julienne-sliced Dressing: 1/3 cup orange juice 1/2 tsp olive oil 1 Tbsp cilantro -- finely chopped, fresh 1/4 tsp chili powder In a large salad bowl, place torn lettuce. Cut orange slices into quarters; toss into lettuce with onion and jicama. For dressing, shake together all ingredients in a shaker jar; toss with salad. Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 82 Calories; 1g Fat (9.1% calories from fat); 2g Protein; 18g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 9mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1 1/2 Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 0 Fat. NOTES : This recipe is one point per serving. * Exported from MasterCook * Stir Fry with Brown Rice and Water Chestnuts Recipe By : Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 16 ounces scallops 1 cup broccoli florets 1 cup oyster mushrooms -- whole 1 cup celery -- chopped 1/2 cup waterchestnuts -- sliced 1 Tbsp sesame oil 1 Tbsp vegetable oil 2 cloves garlic 1/2 cup chicken stock 1/2 tsp light soy sauce 1/2 Tbsp ginger -- fresh chopped 1 tsp cayenne pepper 2 cups cooked brown rice In a large, hot sauté pan add both oils and let heat for ½ minute. Continue adding: scallops or chicken, garlic, ginger, broccoli and celery. Sauté until ½ done, about 2-3 minutes. Add mushrooms, water chestnuts, soy sauce, and hot pepper. Let reduce to about ½ liquid volume. Serve immediately with rice. Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 312 Calories; 9g Fat (25.5% calories from fat); 23g Protein; 34g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 37mg Cholesterol; 517mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 3 Lean Meat; 1/2 Vegetable; 1 1/2 Fat. NOTES : This recipe is 6 points per serving.
  12. I am sure that many of you know about the "5 a Day" plan where you are supposed to eat at least 5 fruits and veggies a day and they say up to 9 is even better. Well, this plan has many good ideas and well thought out information and the "5 a Day" idea works well within the parameters of WW so I thought I would post the 'fruit of the month' as well as the 'vegetable of the month. I will find this thread and add to it each month. Since I am two and almost three months behind, I will go ahead and post January, February, and March, and if I have time, I will post April as well. This could take a few days because I plan to add recipes to try in each month's segment. JANUARY: DRIED FRUIT: Drying is the oldest method of preserving food. The first European settlers in America often ate dried corn, apple, currants, grapes and meat. Sun drying of food was an easy way to prolong the life of food, but this form of dried food was different from what is available today. In different climates, the food dried differently because complete sun drying is dependent on very particular weather conditions. Drying eliminates moisture from the food resulting in a longer food life. Organisms that make food spoil require moisture to survive, so foods that have been completely dried have the longest life. The methods of drying food, particularly fruits and vegetables, have become more sophisticated over time. The three most common methods used today are briefly described below: Solar: Solar dehydration of food requires 3 to 5 consecutive days of 95 degrees or above and low humidity. This climate is found only in limited areas in the United States. Oven: Foods are dried using a household kitchen oven. This method can be expensive as many hours are normally required to dry food. Oven dried foods are often times darker and more brittle than foods dried by other methods. This method is often suggested for first time dryers, as very little new equipment is required for this method. Dehydrator: This type of drying produces the highest quality product. An electric dehydrator may be purchased and various sizes and levels of quality are generally available. Dried fruits and vegetables are high in fiber and carbohydrates and low in fat. However, dried foods are more calorically dense than their fresh counterparts. The recommended serving size for dried fruits and vegetables is half that of fresh. Vitamin C is one nutrient that is destroyed by heat. Pretreating food with citrus juice can help increase the vitamin C content of the dried food. Selection For drying at home, select ripe fruits and vegetables for drying. Bruised fruit may be used if those areas are removed before drying. Do not use any food with mold on it for drying. Peel and slice food into 1/8 to 1/2 inch slices. The higher the water content, the larger the slice should be because the more it will shrink in drying. Pretreating food before drying is a common practice, but not required. Dipping fruits into citrus juices (orange, lemon, or pineapple) helps avoid color changes. Vegetables are best dipped in diluted lemon juice before drying (1/4 cup lemon juice to 2 cups water). Blanching is also recommended for certain vegetables (asparagus, green beans, broccoli, brussles sprouts, cauliflower, and peas). Blanch vegetables in boiling water for 1 to 3 minutes, or until the skin cracks. If you choose to purchase dried fruit at the supermarket, you will generally find a good selection of the most popular fruits. A larger selection of items, especially dried vegetables, are often found at natural food stores. Most dried fruit is sold pre-packaged and may be found in either the fresh produce or canned food departments. Dried fruits and vegetables are also sometimes available in the bulk foods section. Do not purchase any dried food with mold or an abnormal smell. Storage Whether dried at home or purchased, dried fruits and vegetables should be kept in an airtight container. Refrigeration is not necessary, but some people prefer the taste of cold dried food. Dried fruit may be frozen, but this sometimes affects the texture and taste of the food. Shelf life varies from product to product, but most items will keep, if stored properly, for a minimum of one month. Some items, such as raisins, have a significantly longer shelf life of approximately a year or more. Preparation Generally, once a fruit or vegetable is dried, there is no additional preparation before using. Many recipes require the fruit or vegetable be sliced or diced, which is often easier when the item has been refrigerated overnight. Dried fruit and vegetables are commonly used in bread, desserts, granola, or as a topping. Favorites These are the most practical and common items to dry: Fruit: Ripe apples, berries, cherries, peaches, apricots and pears Vegetables: Peas, corn, peppers, tomatoes, onions, potatoes and green beans Make Dried Fruit Part of Your 5 A Day Plan Add dried cranberries to a rice dish to add flavor and color. Sprinkle raisins and dried berries into your morning cereal. Sun dried tomatoes add texture and flavor to pasta and rice dishes. Dried apricots work great in muffins and breads. Dried cherries add color and nutrients to granola or trail mix. * Exported from MasterCook * Apricot Pumpkin Muffins Recipe By : Serving Size : 12 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 2 cups reduced fat Bisquick® 1/2 cup dried apricots -- chopped 1/4 cup sugar 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ginger 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg 1/2 cup milk, skim 1/2 cup canned pumpkin 2 egg whites, whole In a medium bowl, combine baking mix, apricots, sugar, cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg. Mix together milk, pumpkin and egg until well blended. Combine 2 mixtures; beat vigorously 1/2 minute. Fill 12 greased medium muffin cups 2/3 full. Bake in 400f F oven 15 to 20 minutes or until lightly browned on top. Remove from cups and serve warm. Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 116 Calories; 1g Fat (10.7% calories from fat); 3g Protein; 23g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; trace Cholesterol; 268mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 0 Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 1/2 Fat; 1/2 Other Carbohydrates. NOTES : This recipe is 2 points per muffin. * Exported from MasterCook * Couscous with Dried Cranberries, Hazelnuts and Fresh Mint Recipe By : Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 12 ounces couscous 14 1/2 ounces vegetable broth 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 teaspoon lemon juice -- fresh 1/2 cup craisins 2 tablespoons hazelnuts 1/3 cup mint leaves -- fresh Cook the couscous according to the package directions, using broth instead of water. Add a pinch of salt to the broth. While it is cooking, roast the hazelnuts in a very low (250 degrees) oven for 10 minutes or until lightly brown. Wash and finely chop the mint leaves. When the couscous has finished cooking, drain any excess liquid. If more liquid is needed to cook the couscous, add water, a little at a time. Pour the couscous into a serving bowl. Add the oil and the lemon juice. Stir well to coat all the grains. Add the cranberries, hazelnuts and mint leaves. Stir to combine all the ingredients. Serve immediately. Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 332 Calories; 6g Fat (15.0% calories from fat); 9g Protein; 60g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 1mg Cholesterol; 549mg Sodium. Exchanges: 3 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 0 Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 1 Fat. NOTES : This recipe is 6 points per serving. * Exported from MasterCook * Fresh and Dried Apple Dressing Recipe By : Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 2 Tablespoons olive oil 1 1/2 cups yellow onion -- finely chopped 2 cloves garlic -- minced 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger 3/4 cup apples -- peeled, cored and chopped 1 cup dried apples -- chopped 3 Tablespoons raisins -- or dried currants 1 Tablespoon fresh sage -- finely chopped 1 cup apple cider salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Warm olive oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add onion and garlic and saute for about 5 minutes. Add ginger and fresh apples and saute for 3-5 minutes. Add dried apples, currants and sage and stir well. Pour in cider and raise heat to medium high. Cook, stirring occasionally until cider is absorbed, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Serve with roasted pork tenderloin medallions. Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 133 Calories; 5g Fat (30.1% calories from fat); 1g Protein; 24g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 16mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 1 1/2 Fruit; 1 Fat. NOTES : This recipe is between 2 and 3 points so I count it as 3. * Exported from MasterCook * Wild Rice with Sun Dried Tomatoes Recipe By : Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 4 oz wild rice 2 Tbsp pine nuts 1 cup tomatoes, dried -- NOT oil packed 2 tablespoons black olives -- sliced 1/3 cup parsley -- minced Cook the rice in an abundant amount of boiling salted water in a large pot for 35 to 45 minutes or until the grains have almost doubled in size and are tender, but still chewy. Toast the pine nuts lightly (dry skillet) until tan and add to rice. Toss gently to mix. Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 167 Calories; 3g Fat (16.9% calories from fat); 7g Protein; 30g Carbohydrate; 4g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 325mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 0 Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 1/2 Fat. NOTES : This recipe is 3 points per serving.
  13. Thanks Nancy, my DD will want to make these. She loves maple syrup. So, I will let her make them with the walnuts. If I make them for me, I will have to omit the nuts and think of something that will still impart a flavor that goes well with the maple syrup. I was thinking maybe chopped dried apples would work. I can't eat nuts except as nut butter so I have to find a sub that would still taste good.
  14. Hi everyone. I am sure that a lot of you know that I had some real computer problems and am spending most of my time these days putting files and backups back into it. That is no excuse for the fact that I have been totally lax in the Mess Hall. I found a lot of threads posted asking for recipes to be pointed that had gone unanswered and I apologize for that. I will try to do better. Now, about pointing recipe requests. Could you please remember to add INSTRUCTIONS in case someone else wants to make your recipe? Would you also remember to ALWAYS post the number of servings? This is forgotten quite frequently and I have to assume how many servings a recipe will make. That is not as accurate as knowing. And, one last thing, please try to check your spelling. It takes so much longer for me to go back into a recipe and correct a lot of typo's. Master Cook is very exact in it's ingredients and if for instance avocado is spelled avacado, or clove is spelled glove, it just doesn't recognize it. Then I have to fix it before I can point it. I know that sounds petty and I certainly don't mean it to but it just makes things take longer when you have to correct errors. Master Cook basically copies and pastes the recipes to my files with just a few clicks and usually I don't have to correct many errors. I certainly make a lot of typing mistakes myself so I understand how it happens. I am just asking that you reread your recipes before you submit the thread and I will be able to get to a lot more recipes a lot quicker. Thanks to all of you for your patience and I hope everyone has a wonderful Easter tomorrow!
  15. I am so sorry that I didn't get to this recipe sooner. I only just saw it. Unfortunately, the WW points slider doesn't go above 550 points and the fat and sodium are huge in this recipe, but here it is: * Exported from MasterCook * Carne Asada Recipe By : Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 8 corn tortillas 3 limes 5 cups tomato juice 2 tablespoons chili powder 1 tablespoon cumin 1 tablespoon pepper 3 cloves garlic -- minced 1 pound ground beef, 95% lean 1/2 cup avocado -- about one 1 cup salsa 1 cup colby cheese, lowfat 1/2 cup onion -- about one, sliced 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup jalapeno pepper, whole -- sliced 1/2 cup sour cream, light Squeeze lime over meat, then sprinkle with all seasoning. Pour tomato juice and garlic over meat and marinate overnight. BBQ meat, while you slice onions and satue in olive oil. Also chop your avacado. Once meat is done, serve with salsa,jalepenos,sauted onions and sour cream and cheese. S(Internet Address): "http://www.healthdiscovery.net/forums/showthread.php?t=78945" - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 669 Calories; 17g Fat (32.2% calories from fat); 26g Protein; 56g Carbohydrate; 11g Dietary Fiber; 39mg Cholesterol; 1721mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean Meat; 3 1/2 Vegetable; 1/2 Fruit; 2 1/2 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates.
  16. You can still use the Splenda but add something to take up the lost volume such as applesauce or mashed bananas or stewed prunes. You could even use a sugar free syrup which are readily available in the stores these days. I think that for every 1/2 cup of Splenda, you could try 1/3 cup of the fruit or 1/4 cup of syrup added with the Splenda. Good luck and check some links on the web for diabetic recipes. There are a ton of them out there.
  17. There are no instructions for this recipe but it is assumed that you mix it all together and cook it for awhile. Also, no serving number was listed so I assumed about 16 for the purpose of pointing it. If you want the points lower, I would suggest that you use about a half cup of sugar free syrup, 1/3 cup Splenda, and a half cup of brown sugar * Exported from MasterCook * tgi Friday's jack Daniels grill glaze Recipe By : Serving Size : 16 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 12 cloves garlic -- 1 head, roasted and squeezed 1 tablespoon olive oil 2/3 cup water 1 cup pineapple juice 1/4 cup teriyaki sauce 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 1/3 cups dark brown sugar 3 tablespoons lemon juice 3 tablespoons onion -- white, minced 1 tablespoon whiskey -- Jack Daniels 1 tablespoon crushed pineapple 1/4 cup cayenne pepper S(Internet Address): "http://www.healthdiscovery.net/forums/showthread.php?t=79044" - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 101 Calories; 1g Fat (9.5% calories from fat); 1g Protein; 23g Carbohydrate; trace Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 245mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Vegetable; 0 Fruit; 0 Fat; 1 Other Carbohydrates. NOTES : At 16 servings, this comes out to 2 points per serving.
  18. I am sorry that I didn't get to this recipe sooner. I just didn't see it. Too much time working on my computer! Anyway, here it is and it really looks great! * Exported from MasterCook * Slow cooker Black Bean and Corn Soup Recipe By : Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 1 pound black beans -- dry, uncooked 1 package whole kernel corn, frozen -- (10 oz) 1 large chopped onion 4 cloves minced garlic 1 tablespoon cumin 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1/4 teaspoon hot pepper sauce -- (1/4 to 1/2) 4 cups boiling water 1 can stewed tomatoes -- (14 1/2 oz)with juice, Mexican style 2 cups salsa -- medium heat Rinse beans: place in large saucepan. Add enough water to cover by 2 inches. Bring to a boil: reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered for 10 minutes. Remove from heat. Cover and let stand for 1 hour. Drain and rinse beans. In a 4 quart or larger slow cooker, combine the beans, corn, onion, garlic , cumin, salt, coriander and hot pepper sauce. Pour boiling water over all. Cover and cook on low for 8-10 hours or high 4-5 hours. To serve, mash beans slightly to thicken. Stir in undrained tomatoes. Serve with salsa on the side. MAKES 8 SERVINGS. S(Internet Address): "http://www.healthdiscovery.net/forums/showthread.php?t=79872" - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 249 Calories; 1g Fat (4.7% calories from fat); 14g Protein; 48g Carbohydrate; 11g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 569mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Lean Meat; 1 1/2 Vegetable; 0 Fat; 0 Other Carbohydrates. NOTES : This wonderful recipe is only 4 points per serving!
  19. I am so sorry that I only just saw this post. Here is the recipe in MasterCook but I have to say that with 27 grams of fat, you need to do something about that Italian sausage. I would suggest Italian Turkey Sausage if you can find it and it will cut the fat at least in half. 27 grams of fat isn't even on the WW slider. * Exported from MasterCook * Sausage Stew Recipe By : Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00 Categories : Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method -------- ------------ -------------------------------- 2 medium potatoes -- peeled, cubed (2 to 3) 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 pound Italian sausage -- (1 to 1 1/2) 1 large clove garlic -- minced 1/2 cup chopped onion 1 can stewed tomatoes -- (15 ounces) 2 cups chicken broth 1 can tomato paste -- (6 ounces) 1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano 1/2 teaspoon salt -- or to taste 1/4 teaspoon pepper 2 medium green bell peppers -- seeded, chopped Lightly grease or spray slow cooker; place potatoes in bottom of pot. In a large skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add sausage links and brown. Slice links into 1-inch pieces and transfer to slow cooker. Add garlic and onion. In a separate bowl, combine tomatoes, chicken broth, tomato paste, oregano, salt, and pepper; stir to blend. Pour mixture over the sausages in crockpot. Cover and cook on LOW setting 8 to 10 hours, until potatoes are tender. Add bell pepper about 1 hour before serving. S(Internet Address): "http://www.healthdiscovery.net/forums/showthread.php?t=78165" - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 374 Calories; 27g Fat (63.7% calories from fat); 15g Protein; 19g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 58mg Cholesterol; 1173mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 1/2 Lean Meat; 2 Vegetable; 4 Fat.
  20. Sorry that I didn't see your post sooner or I would have tried to help you with the variation but I think that you must have done fine with your calculations. I too make them without the chips but that was added because I sell them and many customers wanted the chips and like them so much with the chips added so I included several of the variations. I even make one for diabetics with no sugar at all and was thinking that maybe I could use maple flavoring because I do use nuts in those but they are much more expensive because I have to dry fresh cranberries when I can find them (I put them in a dehydrator) so there is no sugar in them. Craisins actually have sugar added but I found that my local health food store can get both the dried cranberries and dried blueberries without sugar added in bulk that is much cheaper than me drying them myself and that helps. There are also people that use carob chips but I have never liked the taste of carob.
  21. Please do Nancy! Any variation is great and this sounds wonderful! I have gotten used to making them without the Splenda because I don't need the added sugar anymore. Maple syrup flavor would be great I am thinking so please, post away!
  22. Look at the top of this forum, it is one of the 'sticky' threads. Enjoy your Easter too!
  23. Thanks guys. I am going to make some carrots tomorrow, after all the Easter Bunny loves carrots! Also, some zucchini for me. I can't wait to try it out. Elaine, I am glad you like the bars too!
  24. Well, after almost six weeks of waiting and thinking that it was never going to come I actually finally got my sprooli. Just wanted to know if any of you still use it and what is your favorite recipe? I need all the help I can get since the instructions are very vague. I printed the whole page on Sprooli's here but wondered if anyone had any new great recipes to add? Thanks buddies.
  25. cybergranny

    Mastercook 8.0

    Other than the cd being defective which is entirely possible and probably the most likely answer, you could check to see if you have Windows Service Pack 2 installed to your computer. I know people that had trouble with many different software programs and when they downloaded SP2 from the Windows Update site, they were able to install what ever program that had given them trouble before. I believe it has some patches in it that solves problems with software that was made before XP though because you used to have to get XP Pro in order to install large programs like MasterCook or the Sims. Now that they have improved the home version of XP, those issues are gone and if you install XP2 it takes care of older XP programs.
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